F-35 Engines: How The Pentagon Will Make Sure P&W Performs

All about the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the (cancelled) General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136
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spazsinbad

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Unread post27 Jul 2015, 21:32

For the 'maus92s' here: "...Pratt & Whitney (which contributes to my think tank)..."
F-35 Fighter Engines: How The Pentagon Will Make Sure Pratt & Whitney Performs
23 Jul 2015 Loren Thompson

Long post - best read at source.

Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorenthomps ... rms/print/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post27 Jul 2015, 23:23

Pratt’s contract to build high-performance engines for 2,447 F-35s used by three U.S. military services and hundreds more bought by allies is huge. The most recent official estimates indicate the contract will be worth $67 billion in then-year dollars, and that doesn’t count the multi-decade stream of revenues the United Technologies unit will realize providing spare parts and servicing to the engines after they enter operation.

Amazing $$$ figures. The proverbial goose laying golden eggs for P&W. The selection of the F119 during the ATF competition was only the appetizer for the main course later when the derivative F135 powered both JSF contenders.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post10 Oct 2015, 23:51

A lot of the info in the recent 'ENGINE update potential' article for the F-35 below has been posted/reposted already in various threads on this 'engine' forum so I will PLONK it here - just becuz. And it is relevant to the FORBES article above.
Pratt, GE Battle for Future of Military Engines
10 Oct 2015 Lara Seligman and Jen Judson

"WASHINGTON — The US Air Force and the Army are moving full speed ahead toward next-generation engines the services hope will significantly increase fuel efficiency and power.

And both endeavors pit two giants in the engine-building world against each other: GE Aviation and Pratt & Whitney.

The Air Force is kicking off the next phase of its effort to develop adaptive engine technology, a new concept both companies have been developing for several years. Pratt and GE both submitted proposals, due Sept. 16, for the Air Force’s Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP), which is meant to build and test the new engine model.

Industry expects the Air Force to award contracts for AETP to Pratt and GE in early 2016. The five-year program, which could be worth as much as $950 million to each team, will transition the existing technology out of the Air Force Research Laboratory and into the acquisition realm.

Industry does not expect a downselect to one company in the near term, but the Pentagon will likely make a decision on a single engine solution in the next few years.

If the stakes weren’t high enough, some say AETP will play a role in shaping the requirements for the next-generation fighter jet. As the Air Force works to understand the needs of air power out into the 2030s, the service hopes soon to settle on a path forward for a sixth-generation plane. Under AETP, which runs parallel to the planned analysis of alternatives for sixth gen, Pratt and GE will work alongside the three major aircraft primes to test different concepts....

...AETP Implications For Sixth-Gen Fighter
The Air Force Research Laboratory has been working with GE and P&W on adaptive, “three-stream” engine technology for several years, under a science and technology program called Adaptive Engine Technology Development (AETD).

Fixed-cycle engines powering today’s military aircraft are limited to one capability: either maximum power or fuel efficiency. The adaptive engine concept enables new engines to switch between the two. Where most fighter jet engines have two “spools” of air, the adaptive engine design adds a third stream around the outside of the engine. By changing that air stream, engineers can adapt the engine to get optimal performance throughout the flight envelope, according to Jimmy Kenyon, Pratt’s director of advanced programs and technology.

“It’s like shifting a gear in your car, shifting a gear on your bicycle,” Kenyon explained. “You change the way the machinery works together so you match the conditions you are running out.”

Both companies finished up design review this year, and will continue to build and test individual components under AETD. The follow-on program, AETP, will build and test full-up engines, Kenyon said.

Pratt’s AETD engine improves fuel efficiency by 25 percent, thrust by 20 percent and range by 30 percent, Kenyon said. Similarly, GE’s AETD design improves fuel consumption by 25 percent, increases thrust by 20 percent, and extends aircraft operating range by 30 percent.

Pratt is still on contract to build F135 engines for Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter jet, and the company is working on upgrades to improve the fuel efficiency and thrust for that engine. The company sees potential to incorporate some of the technology developed under AETD into the F135, Kenyon said.

GE’s proposal builds on the company’s commercial LEAP and GE9X engines, which will soon enter service with the Airbus' new A320 and Boeing’s new 737 MAX, according to Dan McCormick, who leads the company’s adaptive cycle program. In addition to the third air stream, the engine leverages ceramic matrix composites,a new type of material that can withstand hotter temperatures than conventional metals, and additive manufacturing.

In the next few years, industry expects AETP to look at the application of adaptive engine technology to the next-generation fighter jet. Under AETP, the companies will contract with primes Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Northrop Grumman to conduct trade studies on fit and integration of the new engines into next-generation aircraft designs, McCormick said. This contractual effort is intended to inform the Navy and Air Force’s ongoing analysis of alternatives for the FA-XX and F-X sixth-generation fighter programs, he said.

“This is definitely intended to help populate a matrix of capabilities that help both services determine what capabilities could be provided to the aircraft relative to Mach numbers and ranges and payloads, the typical characteristics,” McCormick said.

AFRL declined to comment on future contractual efforts...."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /73201826/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post05 Jan 2016, 21:06

Not worth a new thread so plonked here.../
Boom Time for Civil Engine Makers
05 Jan 2016 Guy Norris

"...In military propulsion, the biggest actively growing production program remains the Pratt & Whitney F135 for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). Not including early test and development engines, more than 150 F135s are powering the JSF. Some 45 F-35s joined the U.S. and international fleet this year, with 63 due in 2016 and 93 in 2017 if budgets are approved. Production thereafter is set to rise to 160-168 aircraft per year among the three assembly sites in the U.S., Italy and Japan. To support this plan, Pratt delivered 50 F135s in 2015 and plans to deliver 58 in 2016. Longer term, the company is gearing up for a maximum rate of six F135 engines per month toward the end of the decade...."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/commercial-avia ... ine-makers
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/

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