F135 AEDC Experiences Record-Breaking Accelerate Mission Tst

All about the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the (cancelled) General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136
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spazsinbad

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Unread post08 Jan 2015, 21:46

AEDC Experiences Record-Breaking Accelerated Mission Test
05 Nov 2014 by Deidre Ortiz AEDC/PA

"11/5/2014 - ARNOLD AIR FORCE BASE, TENN. -- A highly successful accelerated mission test (AMT) of Pratt & Whitney's F135 conventional take-off and landing/carrier variant (CTOL/CV) engine was recently completed in the Sea Level 3 test cell (SL-3) at AEDC.

A Total Accumulated Cycle (TAC) count of 2,600, with record TAC accumulation of 80-90 per day was accomplished during the AMT of this F135 engine, found in versions of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter used by the U.S. Air Force and Navy.

"One reason this test was significant is that it was the first 2,600 TAC Accelerated Mission Test on the F135 engine at AEDC," said John Kelly, AEDC F135 test manager. "Previously these AMTs have been done at the Pratt & Whitney facility in West Palm Beach, Fla."

Test results provided integrated aircraft thermal load simulation, as well as led to the re-activation of special test equipment for the F135 that hasn't been used in several years.

Additionally, record test time efficiency of 98 percent was achieved for the test.

Testing was originally scheduled over a period of four months but wrapped up earlier than anticipated.

"The test occurred without any issues at all," Kelly said. "Usually in any test you encounter issues that cause a delay. But with this test we beat our optimistic estimate for completion by a month."

Crew members worked 24-hour operations, five days a week, occasionally even working around-the-clock six days a week. Coordination with test support activities occurred, allowing for the 24-hour coverage...."

Source: http://www.arnold.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123430646

http://www.arnold.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/2014/11/090319-F-9114G-024.jpg
CAPTION: "A Pratt & Whitney F135 engine for the Conventional Take-Off and Landing version of the F-35 Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter completed a record-breaking accelerated mission test in the Sea Level 3 (SL-3) test cell at AEDC. Shown here is a previous test of the F135 in the AEDC SL- 3 test cell. (Photo by Rick Goodfriend)"
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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popcorn

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Unread post08 Jan 2015, 23:38

In layman's terms, what is the objective of this engine test? How many actual flight hours is it intended to simulate?
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 00:12

Military Jet Engine Acquisition
Technology Basics and Cost-Estimating Methodology 2002

"...AMT Notional Engine Development Test Plan...
...Three to four test engines within the development program would typically be designated for endurance testing and accelerated mission testing (AMT), hot section life verification, and formal qualification. Endurance testing is conducted in a sea-level test cell and is used to verify that the life of critical hot and cold section engine parts meets design and specification requirements. Engine endurance is now demonstrated using an AMT. The AMT uses a mission-based simulation, called a duty cycle, to subject the engine in the test cell to the conditions it is likely to experience in actual operation. In constructing the duty cycle, the engine designer studies the system’s full spectrum of projected mission profiles. The designer then develops a “composite” cycle that reflects, in a compressed period of testing, a series of representative throttle settings, transients, dwell times, pressures, and temperatures. So, for example, one hour of endurance testing is designed to duplicate the structural demands of multiple hours of mission operation in the aircraft. Cycles are now run on an automated schedule in the test cell to allow for rapid accumulation of endurance hours in a minimal number of test hours. This reduces test costs and allows endurance testing to stay ahead of the fleet when introducing new components. Successful completion of this durability testing and certification means that no additional development effort is required for full specification compliance and leads to approval of the OCR milestone. The OCR milestone demonstrates system durability, which was not addressed by the MQT, and was added to provide a more reliable fielded system to the operator.

Hot and cold section life verification is one of the elements of endurance testing. A tailored duty cycle may be developed to target damage accumulation specifically at hot or cold section parts because the life of these components is typically affected by different types of operation. A series of these types of tests is run throughout the development program....

...Pushing the state-of-the-art in integrated technologies leads to discoveries of new technical challenges both within these technological areas and at the points these technologies intersect. Because the application of new or refined jet engine technologies has been fairly continuous, so has the flow of new technical and support challenges. This situation is compounded for front-line fighter engines by the expansion of the flight envelopes for successive fighters. As we discussed in Appendix A, engine manufacturers, in cooperation with their customers, conduct rigorous development and testing programs, including AMT, to solve as many technical problems as possible before the engines are fielded. However, some problems are not manifested until the engine is stressed in actual combat or rigorous training environments, and sometimes not until engines have been operated for thousands of hours...."

Source: http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pu ... MR1596.pdf (3.3Mb)
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 02:27

popcorn wrote:In layman's terms, what is the objective of this engine test? How many actual flight hours is it intended to simulate?


Engine life is not measured in hours it is heat cycles. The number of hours depends on the type of sorties flown. Squadrons like the Aggressors and T-Bird generate lots of cycles in relatively short number of hours. The USAF used to estimate approximately 1.6~1.8 cycles per sortie. However a sortie can be a 30 min check ride, or 10 hour ferry flight.
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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 02:31

h-bomb wrote:
popcorn wrote:In layman's terms, what is the objective of this engine test? How many actual flight hours is it intended to simulate?


Engine life is not measured in hours it is heat cycles. The number of hours depends on the type of sorties flown. Squadrons like the Aggressors and T-Bird generate lots of cycles in relatively short number of hours. The USAF used to estimate approximately 1.6~1.8 cycles per sortie. However a sortie can be a 30 min check ride, or 10 hour ferry flight.

Thanks for the clarification. I guess in combat situations those numbers can spike dramatically.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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KamenRiderBlade

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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 05:48

Looking at that picture makes me think:

Has anybody ever tried to cook a turkey a safe distance away from the exhaust of a Jet Engine?
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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 06:10

I don't know about a Turkey, but jet engine cooking has been a thing for quite a while :mrgreen:
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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 06:18

dragon029 wrote:I don't know about a Turkey, but jet engine cooking has been a thing for quite a while :mrgreen:


Any pics / videos?
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Unread post09 Jan 2015, 07:03

Military examples hard to come by and aren't easily found via Google, etc (people don't want to get in trouble), but here's some civilian examples:




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