F135 Exceeds Expectations - Live Fire Survivability Test

All about the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the (cancelled) General Electric/Rolls-Royce F136
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spazsinbad

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Unread post21 May 2014, 08:23

F135 Exceeds Expectations During Live Fire Survivability Testing 20 May 2014 ASDnews

"...Three F135 test series were conducted, including Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) propulsion system tests; dynamic and static engine ballistic tests; and finally, total fuel ingestion tests. These tests were aimed at better understanding the advanced engine control system, the capabilities of the main engine with battle damage, and to assess the engine's fuel ingestion tolerance.

According to the JASPO report, the "STOVL propulsion system was very tolerant of damage with little performance loss over the course of the testing." The report also indicated that the "propulsion control system is very capable in its ability to withstand and accommodate damage via built in redundancies… [and] the engine showed a high tolerance of ingested fuel."

The JASPO report concluded that damage to blades and vanes in both the lift fan and main engine did not result in catastrophic damage, and that, in fact, the F135 engine and its control system are capable of withstanding and accommodating damage, and providing information to alert the pilot to the damage sustained by the system. The data collected from these LFTs will be used to update assumptions used in the F135 vulnerability assessment.

"This series of tests on the CTOL/CV and STOVL variants is intended to mimic battlefield damage in wartime scenarios. The F135 is an amazing propulsion system that has proved its durability through this very rigorous testing by sustaining increasing levels of damage, yet continues to operate to the customer specifications," said Cheryl Lobo, director, F135 programs. "These tests should provide confidence in the capabilities of the propulsion system for our operators."...

SOURCE: http://www.asdnews.com/news-55072/F135_ ... esting.htm
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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popcorn

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Unread post21 May 2014, 11:05

Well, if the B-jet fares this well dealing with battle,damage, it augurs well for operating from austere forward locations.
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post21 May 2014, 14:22

"The F135 is an amazing propulsion system that has proved its durability through this very rigorous testing by sustaining increasing levels of damage, yet continues to operate to the customer specifications,"

So let me get this straight. The F135 can go to 120% rated thrust and meet durability specs. It can be heavily damaged and still meet specs. The RAM can be scratched and gouged and still meet specs. This plane is tougher than expected.
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Unread post21 May 2014, 15:57

:devil: Pssst, 'popcorn', don't mention that. :mrgreen:
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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That_Engine_Guy

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Unread post22 May 2014, 00:02

The legend of Pratt & Whitney "Graceful Degradation" continues.... :thumb:

"Thrust you can trust!"

TEG
[Airplanes are] near perfect, all they lack is the ability to forgive.
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Unread post22 May 2014, 05:34

That_Engine_Guy wrote:The legend of Pratt & Whitney "Graceful Degradation" continues.... :thumb:

"Thrust you can trust!"

TEG

Was the F-16 pilot who hit trees on a ridgeline, in a PW or GE bird?
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Unread post22 May 2014, 05:43

The current complete JASPO PDF with the LFT for the F135 is here:

AS Journal 14 / SPRING: F135 PROPULSION SYSTEM LIVE FIRE TEST (LFT)

http://jaspo.csd.disa.mil/images/archiv ... spring.pdf (1.5Mb)

The three relevant F135 LFT pages are attached.
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F135 pp3 JASPO F-35 Engine 2014_spring.pdf
(229.99 KiB) Downloaded 789 times
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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blindpilot

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Unread post22 May 2014, 05:58

That_Engine_Guy wrote:The legend of Pratt & Whitney "Graceful Degradation" continues.... :thumb:

"Thrust you can trust!"

TEG


Not always. I had a J57 catastrophically shell with about 40 ft if flame out the back and a good 15 to 20 ft out the front on me. That was NOT graceful. :)

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Unread post24 Apr 2015, 12:10

FIGHTER AIRCRAFT SURVIVABILITY–A PERSPECTIVE This article - 6 page PDF - attached below
Mark Stewart AS Journal 14 / SUMMER

"After almost 30 years of working in the survivability discipline, I have seen a lot of changes. Some changes were positive, others... you be the judge. I have had the privilege to work on several fighter aircraft programs, including the F-16, F-22, and the F-35. I would like to think I had at least a small part in improving the combat effectiveness of these platforms, but I have probably failed more than I have succeeded in these endeavors. Sometimes I believe I have lived my professional career to provide a list of things not to do. And, while The Fundamentals of Aircraft Combat Survivability Analysis and Design [1] still provides the foundation for the discipline, there were many things I just had to muddle through. It is with no small amount of trepidation that I offer a few words that I have discovered to be true over the course of the years. Maybe an idea or two in the writing below will provide insights on what has happened... and on what to avoid.

CHANGES IN THE PROCESS (AND THINGS THAT REMAIN)
“Back in the day” ...I discovered that the “discipline” in fact seemed to have very little to do with discipline. Kill mechanisms and component vulnerabilities were anecdotal in nature, with test data only a vague recollection of events. We now use computer-aided design (CAD) techniques to create truly marvelous 3-D target models in “living color” and run analyses that take days of computer time. I was told that the first F-16 target model (created before my time) required five people and 2 years to complete — a model that contained less than 2 Mbytes of data. In contrast, the 2001 version of F-16 target model was created in 6 months, and weighs in at over 220 Mbytes; more recent F-35 models are in the 1 Gbyte category....

...SUMMARY
Some things have definitely changed over the years, but the need to remain vigilant when dealing with designers, to challenge the assumptions in your analysis and continue checking your inputs and comparing your results with previous analyses are all still important to improve the state of the art in vulnerability assessments. It still comes down to the analyst conducting the analysis, and this fact will never change."

References
[1] Robert E. Ball. The Fundamentals of Aircraft Combat Survivability Analysis and Design (Reston: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc., 2003).

SOURCE: http://jaspo.csd.disa.mil/images/archiv ... summer.pdf (2.6Mb)
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JASPO FIGHTER AIRCRAFT SURVIVABILITY–A PERSPECTIVE 2014_summer.pdf
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/

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