Effects of flight altitude on sensors: f-22 vs f-35

The F-35 compared with other modern jets.
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aw2007

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Unread post01 Dec 2016, 15:08

Are there any ? ie., radars, passive sensors (an/asq-239, an/alr-94)
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Dragon029

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Unread post01 Dec 2016, 15:20

The higher you fly the further the horizon gets; also the higher you fly the thinner the atmosphere and lower the chance of precipitation and clouds.
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wrightwing

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Unread post01 Dec 2016, 15:53

aw2007 wrote:Are there any ? ie., radars, passive sensors (an/asq-239, an/alr-94)

How far can you see from the top of a 100' building? How far can you see from the top of a 10,000' mountain? Altitude works the same way, for sensors.
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delvo

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Unread post06 Dec 2016, 18:00

Dragon029 wrote:the higher you fly the thinner the atmosphere and lower the chance of precipitation and clouds.
Around the plane? Maybe. But not between the plane and the ground.
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marauder2048

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Unread post07 Dec 2016, 00:09

delvo wrote:
Dragon029 wrote:the higher you fly the thinner the atmosphere and lower the chance of precipitation and clouds.
Around the plane? Maybe. But not between the plane and the ground.



Surprisingly, and especially once above the water-cloud layer, it's average atmospheric attenuation
that matters for radar work. At higher altitudes, there are reduced atmospheric losses due to the
signal path traversing a thinner average atmosphere. So higher is better for radar.

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