F-35 and X-47B

The F-35 compared with other modern jets.
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Unread post20 Oct 2016, 05:25

USN awards MQ-25 risk reduction contract to Northrop Grumman
20 Oct 2016 Stephen Trimble

"Northrop Grumman has become the fourth and final contractor to win a contract from the US Navy to modify a preliminary design for an unmanned stealth bomber into an aerial tanker.

The $35.8 million award to Northrop on 19 October supports the Navy’s decision earlier this year to convert the MQ-25 Stingray into a refueling asset.

Northrop was one of four companies, including Boeing, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems and Lockheed Martin, that completed preliminary designs for the MQ-25 when it was known as the unmanned carrier-launched surveillance and strike mission. The so-called UCLASS was a very different aircraft, designed to penetrate defended airspace, collect intelligence and attack targets.

The Navy converted UCLASS in the carrier-based air refueling system (CBARS) contract earlier this year. Instead of prowling deep behind enemy lines, the CBARS would mainly fly circles around the carrier battle group or escort strike packages, topping off the fuel tanks of manned fighters before they entered defended airspace without the MQ-25.

As a result, the Navy has asked the four companies to modify the preliminary designs to reflect the new mission for the aircraft, which is now referred to as the unmanned carrier aviation air system (UCAAS).

Northrop’s contract value feel about $8 million short of the $43 million deals awarded to the other companies. It was not immediately clear why Northrop received a lesser amount...."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... op-430550/
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Unread post23 Oct 2016, 00:41

Navy Awards Fourth Contract for Unmanned Carrier Aircraft Concept
21 Oct 2016 RICHARD R. BURGESS

"ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy has selected a fourth company to refine concepts for the future MQ-25 unmanned carrier-based aerial refueling aircraft.

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) awarded a $35.8 million cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to Northrop Grumman “to conduct risk-reduction activities in support of the MQ-25 unmanned carrier aviation air system, including refinement of concepts and development of trade space for requirements generation in advance of the engineering and manufacturing development phase of the program,” according to the Oct. 19 contract announcement.

Within the last three weeks, NAVAIR awarded Lockheed Martin, Boeing and General Atomics cost-plus-fixed-fee contracts valued at $43.6 million, $43.4 million and $43.7, respectively, for the same purpose in separate efforts.

The MQ-25 is the Navy’s designation for its current program to develop an unmanned carrier-launched jet aircraft to operate in a manner integrated with a carrier air wing. The Navy settled on aerial refueling as the MQ-25’s primary mission in a go-slow approach to mature the unmanned technology and free up F/A-18E/F Super Hornet strike fighters from the aerial refueling role. The MQ-25 could be assigned additional tasks such as surveillance.

The ability of an unmanned jet aircraft to launch from and recover aboard an aircraft carrier already has been demonstrated by the X-47B, which was developed by Northrop Grumman.

The work for all four contractors is due for completion by October 2017."

Source: http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/20161021-mq25.html
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Unread post17 Nov 2016, 15:43

More blah blah blah than youse can stick a poke at in the endless will they will they FINALLY get going on the STINGRAY!
Navy Puts Procurement of Carrier Drone on Fast Track [lots more blah at the URL]
Dec 2016 Jon Harper

"The Navy is expediting its effort to acquire a carrier-launched unmanned tanker, as service officials seek to usher in a new era of naval aviation.

The MQ-25 Stingray would enable carrier-based strike aircraft such as the F/A-18 Super Hornet to have greater range.

“We need to get [the MQ-25] to the fleet as quick as we can so we can start learning about that manned-unmanned teaming and integrate that into the air wing,” Naval Air Systems Command Commander Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker said at a recent conference.

The plane is also to be equipped with intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities.

Four companies — Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Northrop Grumman and General Atomics — were recently awarded contracts to conduct risk reduction activities in support of the program. The work includes refinement of concepts and development of trade space for requirements generation in advance of the engineering and manufacturing development phase.

Boeing, Lockheed and General Atomics were awarded $43 million each. Northrop Grumman received a $35 million contract. The work is expected to be completed by October 2017.

The concept refinement work will inform the request for proposals for engineering and manufacturing development. An RFP release is slated for the summer of 2017, and a contract award is expected in 2018, according to Navy officials.

“The tanking mission will govern the aircraft configuration design trades, which will prioritize better tanking capability over the secondary … ISR mission,” Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson said in an Aug. 24 memo clarifying the aim of the program.

The main objective in the early phase is to identify key system technologies, attributes and approaches that balance cost, schedule and performance, he added.

“We’ll go through the development of the alternatives looking at what capabilities different vendors might bring to address that operational need,” Robert Kimble, the deputy program executive officer for unmanned aviation at NAVAIR, said at a recent industry conference.

There is a sense of urgency. The service has created a maritime accelerated capabilities office, or MACO, to provide “a speed lane” in the acquisition process. Richardson and Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition Sean Stackley function as “the board of directors” and will provide direct oversight of the office’s activities.

The MQ-25 is one of two initial programs under the office’s purview, along with the large displacement unmanned underwater vehicle program.

The projects “will be conducted on accelerated timelines, require unique industrial interactions and leverage related activities of other government agencies and organizations,” said Vice Adm. David Johnson, Stackley’s principal military deputy.

“We must continue to innovate and improve the speed at which we field these systems,” he added.

The Navy hopes to have an operational MQ-25 by the early 2020s. The service is keen to use the Stingray to hone its manned-unmanned teaming operating concept, whereby drones would partner with manned platforms to conduct various mission sets...."

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... Track.aspx
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Unread post18 Nov 2016, 00:32

Maybe one day we'll get some hint how big this thing is going to be. Being able to pass significantly more gas than a SH would be nice.
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Unread post28 Jan 2017, 00:48

Photo release: X-47B departs Pax River
26 Jan 2017 PEO(U&W) Public Affairs

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, Patuxent River, Md. -- An X-47B unmanned aircraft departed NAS Patuxent River, Md. Jan.26 for cross country trip back to Northrop Grumman's manufacturing facility in Palmdale, Calif. As part of the Unmanned Carrier Air System-Demonstration (UCAS-D) program, the X-47B demonstrated technologies to support the Navy's unmanned carrier aviation efforts. The second X-47B aircraft will make the same trip next month. Northrop Grumman plans to use both aircraft as test beds for future development programs. (U.S. Navy photo)

PHOTO: http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/_AS225051.jpg (2.1Mb) cropped below

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6472
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Unread post10 Feb 2017, 13:19

U.S. Navy Moves Ahead On Carrier-based Drone [IT IS COMPLICATED so BEST READ AT source]
07 Feb 2017 Lara Seligman

"...the concept of an unmanned refueling/ISR platform presents a problem: The design elements required for a tanker and a surveillance aircraft are fundamentally at odds. An ISR aircraft needs to fly at high altitudes for long periods, so a large wingspan and efficient engine design are essential. ISR assets generally don’t carry much fuel internally, as this adds weight to the platform. By contrast, a tanker must carry enough fuel to tank all of the carrier air wing’s strike aircraft, requiring a larger engine.

Naval aviation planners and industry are working on finding the “sweet spot” for MQ-25 to fulfill both missions, said Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker, commander of Naval Air Forces, during an event in Washington last year.

Also at issue is how stealthy MQ-25 needs to be for the future operating environment. Although a recent top-level Pentagon review concluded survivability would not be a key requirement, the Navy is looking to see if there is a way to capitalize on certain existing “shapes” to make the platform less vulnerable, according to Shoemaker....

...Shoemaker suggests that the Navy is at least considering a stealthy shape for MQ-25, arguing that a tanker forward-deployed to hostile territory could be vulnerable.

“If you look at the way you would conduct mission tanking, you have got to push something out ahead of everybody to get it on station so you can launch your other airplanes,” Shoemaker says. “If you send the MQ-25 out by itself, and it does not have survivability, you have got to know where you are sending it so it’s not going to get shot down.”

While Shoemaker cautions that “stealth tanker, those two don’t go together on MQ-25,” there are steps the Navy could take to evolve a tanker UAV into a survivable strike platform itself.

It would be relatively easy to modify a tanker to carry weapons—simply swap out the fuel carried internally for bombs. And, if MQ-25 is based on a flying-wing design, already optimized for stealth, the Navy could add radar-absorbing coating to maximize survivability."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/us-navy ... ased-drone
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Unread post22 Mar 2017, 05:30

Here we go again - round and round the mulberry bush.... So the SupaDupa spends 25-30% of air time as a TANKER!
Skunk Works Head: Latest Navy MQ-25A Requirements Pushing Competitors to Redesign Offers
21 Mar 2017 Sam LaGrone

"ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy’s latest revised list of requirements for its carrier-based unmanned aerial tanker will likely push all four competitors to redesign their bids, the head of Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Work division said on Tuesday.

The Navy’s latest direction for the MQ-25A Stingray would further minimize information, reconnaissance and surveillance (ISR) requirements for the airframe and further reduce strike as a mission, Rob Weiss, the head of the company’s internal aviation research and development arm, said at Lockheed Martin’s annual media day.

“The Navy came out with these requirements perhaps in the last six to eight months, and they still haven’t given us the final system requirements document – that should be coming any day – with specifically what they want this tanker to do,” Weiss said.
“From our viewpoint, the requirements, as they are currently unfolding, are going to require a new design from all of the competitors. It’s now very tanker-focused. We’re looking at what those requirements are, there will probably be a follow-up capability – some ISR it could do and potentially some strike – but it’s very much focused on tanking.”

Along with Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, General Atomics and Boeing are competing for the first operational carrier-based unmanned aerial vehicle.

As part of his presentation, Weiss teased an image of Lockheed Martin concept that showed a view of a wing with an aerial refueling tank hanging from a pylon and trailing a probe-and-drogue fuel line to an F/A-18E Super Hornet.

Currently, the Navy refuels its carrier aircraft with its Super Hornet fleet. The tanking mission accounts from anywhere from 25 to 30 percent of Super Hornet sorties, further exacerbating the ongoing tactical aviation shortfalls in the service. That demand – in part – is pushing the Navy to get a tanking UAV into service as soon as possible rather than creating a more multi-mission platform, USNI News understands.

“If the requirements were about penetrating ISR in contested airspace – be it ISR or strike – you would need an airplane that looks different than the concept you’ve got up there with pylons and so forth doing tanking,” he said.

Last year, Weiss suggested the Navy pursue a more stealthy tailless flying wing design that could be adapted to higher-end missions later. “If you start with a vehicle shape that will allow it to penetrate into a contested environment, you can get a low-cost tanking capability upfront without putting all the capability into that vehicle. … You can do it at low cost but stay on that same path to use that vehicle design to operate in a penetrating environment,” Weiss said in 2016.

Later last year, Commander of Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. Mike Shoemaker said industry was struggling with designs that could blend the requirements of an ISR platform and a tanker. The Air Boss said the two missions lent themselves to two different types of platforms.

A primarily-ISR UAV would be a high-endurance platform that would “probably not carry a lot of fuel, have a large wingspan,” to be an efficient platform, Shoemaker said in August. “If you’re going to be a tanker at range, you’re obliviously going to have to be able to carry a fair amount of fuel internal to the platform. … That drives the different design for those two. So the industry is working on an analysis of where that sweet spot is to do both of those missions.”

However, based on Weiss’s comments, the Navy’s latest revision to the requirements seem to push all the competitors to a wing-body-tail design for Stingray rather than the flying wing concept both Lockheed and Northrop were thought to be developing for the MQ-25A program.

“The requirements have been defined to be a tanker, so you really don’t want to go with a tailless design if your primary requirement is associated tanking,” he said
.

General Atomics and Boeing both have proposed wing-body-tail for their MQ-25A proposal in the past, USNI News understands.

Following a draft Request for Proposal issued last year directly to the four competitors, the Navy is expected to issue the final RFP this summer, with an expected contract award in 2018, Weiss said.

The MQ-25A is the Navy’s follow-up program to the service’s Unmanned Carrier Launched Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) UAV program that developed an aircraft primarily for ISR. However, the program was restructured following a 2015 Office of Secretary of Defense review led by Deputy Defense Secretary Bob Work, and it became a tanking-first concept that became MQ-25A.

While the four competitors are developing the airframe, the Navy is developing the ground control station and the data link packages for the MQ-25A that remain largely unchanged from the UCLASS program."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2017/03/21/skunk- ... ign-offers
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Unread post22 Mar 2017, 06:09

Good development for General Atomics. IMO their offering to meet the UCLASS requirement based on Sea Avenger would have been disadvantaged vs the other contending designs. But for the tanker mission GA is right in the ball park. It appear a strike UAS will merit a custom design.
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Unread post23 Mar 2017, 09:37

Navy May Redesign MQ-25A Drone Refueling Tanker
22 Mar 2017 Oriana Pawlyk

"Development of the U.S. Navy‘s first drone refueling tanker — the MQ-25A — is progressing but may require some redesign before final bids go out, the head of Lockheed Martin Corp.’s advanced development division said Tuesday.

Rob Weiss, chief of the company’s advanced research division known as Skunk Works, said the service wants “the drone to be a refueling tanker intended to deploy rapidly … for a carrier.” But service officials are still considering configurations, including strike capability, he said.

The Bethesda, Maryland-based defense giant gave a glimpse into its work, showing a partial image of refueling pod under the aircraft’s wing with a hose-and-drogue system during a daylong briefing with reporters at the company’s offices in Arlington, Virginia, outside Washington, D.C....

...Over the last eight months, Lockheed’s Skunk Works has “been working with the Navy, their maritime advanced capability office [and] they’re frankly doing all the right things to accelerate [huh?] this program and get it to the hands of the warfighters,” Weiss said.

He added that “solutions” are being worked out to house the MQ-25A properly within the program. Without disclosing details, he said the Navy hasn’t finalized its needs and is still sending over new requirements “of what exactly they want this tanker to be.” Weiss said the drone, in enabling carrier operations, would provide “more legs, more reach for both the F/A-18s and the F-35s [at a] more significant range.”

Source: https://www.defensetech.org/2017/03/22/ ... ng-tanker/
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Unread post14 Apr 2017, 15:31

General Atomics Says It’s Well-Positioned as Low-Risk Option for Carrier Drone Competition
11 Apr 2017 RICHARD R. BURGESS

"ARLINGTON, Va. — General Atomics (GA) has never built a tailhook aircraft for the Navy but that is not stopping it from competing with the Boeings, Lockheed Martins and Northrop Grummans of the world to design the MQ-25A Stingray aerial refueling unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for operation from aircraft carriers.

Doug Hardison, director of Marine Corps and Navy business development for GA, told Seapower his company’s leadership in fielding unmanned combat aircraft enables it to approach the problem in a different way from other companies.

The company’s proposed Sea Avenger unmanned aerial vehicle is “a natural,” said Chuck Wright, director of GA’s MQ-25A program, noting that the winged-body Sea Avenger can carry a lot of fuel, has low drag and features a large amount of space, weight and power available for payloads.

Carrier suitability will be the biggest challenge for GA in the competition, said Wright, a former Navy carrier pilot. “We’ve retained the core of the team that started in 2011. Key engineer leads have been in the program for five to seven years,” he said.

Hardison, a former Marine Corps helicopter pilot, pointed out that GA’s work on the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System and Advanced Arresting Gear programs has given the company a lot of insight into carrier operations...."

Source: http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/20170411-ga.html
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Unread post15 Apr 2017, 02:18

UhOh RazzaMattaz agin but slowly slowly catchee monkee.... MORE acronyms that ye can stick a poke at in this report:
MQ-25 program validates future mission control system through simulated test
13 Apr 2017 PEO(U&W) Public Affairs

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. -- The Navy’s MQ-25 program completed its first demonstration representing how the mission control system located aboard the aircraft carrier will control and transmit information to an unmanned air vehicle in the future.

The April 11 demonstration validated the first build of the MD-5 Unmanned Carrier Aviation Mission Control System (UMCS), a combined hardware and software product, using representative shipboard equipment and a simulated air vehicle at NAS Patuxent River....

...Operationally, the MQ-25 will provide a robust organic refueling capability to make better use of the Navy’s combat strike fighters and extend the range of the carrier air wing. It will also have a secondary intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability."

PHOTO: "A team from NAVAIR simulates the operation of the future MQ-25 during a demo of the Unmanned Carrier Aviation Mission Control System (UMCS) at NAS Patuxent River, Md. in April 2017. (U.S. Navy photo)" http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... ill005.jpg (1.1Mb)


Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6519
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Unread post15 Apr 2017, 02:52

<sarc> drip drip drip keeps on a'comin' in - I'm weary from boredom - get on with it! Buy MORE SUPER HORNET TANKERS!
Navy Investing More Funds into Risk Reduction for MQ-25 Aerial Refueling UAV
14 Apr 2017 RICHARD R. BURGESS

"ARLINGTON, Va.— The Navy has modified the concept development contracts of the four aerospace companies competing to build the service’s MQ-25A Stingray aerial refueling unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and adding a total of $81.5 million to the development program.

In a series of contract awards, Naval Air System Command awarded to Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Boeing, Lockheed Martin and General Atomics Aeronautical Systems additional amounts of $24.8 million, $19.1 million, $18.9 million and $18.7 million, respectively, “to conduct additional risk reduction activities in support of the MQ-25 Unmanned Carrier Aviation Air System, including refinement of concepts and development of trade space for requirements generation in advance of the engineering and manufacturing development phase of the program,” according to the April 13 contract announcements.

In October, the four companies were awarded the initial concept development risk-reduction contracts to the amounts of $43.7 million, $43.6 million, $43.4 million and $35.8 million for General Atomics, Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Northrop Grumman, respectfully.

The Navy’s concept for its first a carrier-based UAV has evolved over the last few years to a more limited mission set for initial deployment. The key performance parameters for the MQ-25 are the ability to refuel aircraft in flight and to operate from an aircraft carrier, although an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability could be added.

The Navy’s request for proposals for the MQ-25A is expected to be released this summer. The Navy plans to field the MQ-25 by the early 2020s."

Source: http://seapowermagazine.org/stories/201 ... 25uav.html
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Unread post15 Apr 2017, 21:59

spazsinbad wrote:...
MQ-25 program validates future mission control system through simulated test
...


http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6519


MQ-25 program validates future mission control system through simulated test


Within the LSI construct, PMA-268 maintains responsibility for the architecture, configuration, production, development and sustainment of the UMCS. The UMCS hardware builds on NAVSEA Common Display System (CDS) and Common Processing System (CPS) from DDG-1000 and other Aegis ships. It also incorporates the Navy’s Common Control System (CCS), a software architecture managed by PMA-281 that features a common framework, user interface and components designed for use with a variety of unmanned systems. The PMA-268 team integrated an open mission systems platform to support the reuse of government owned mission management, mission planning and sensor control applications. UMCS 1.0 demonstrated that third party software can coexist with the CCS framework, thereby proving the UMCS architecture is viable, Duarte said. During the demo, the UMCS communicated with a Mobile Aviation Interoperability Lab (MAIL) truck, simulating a UAV, verifying command and control. The team tested connectivity between the UMCS and shipboard network systems and verified voice trunking (internet protocol to serial) capability between the air vehicle operator and the simulated UAV. The team also performed limited control and data dissemination between the UMCS and simulated UAV to include Automatic Identification System (AIS) detection, Electro-optical/Infrared (EO/IR) Camera operation and dynamic mission re-planning. “The Surface Aviation Interoperability Lab (SAIL) and System Test & Integration Laboratory (STIL) were integral in making this demonstration a success,” said Jaimie Grubb, UMCS team lead. “By doing demos in the lab first, we are able to prove the control system concept before providing the UMCS to the air system vendor and undergoing test, which provides significant risk reduction as well as schedule and cost savings.” This demonstration is the first of a continuing, annual series to demonstrate UMCS capabilities as development of the system progresses. Future demonstrations will show the ability to control a small UAS and establish the process for flight and cybersecurity approval s and the integration of software specific to the MQ-25A air vehicle. The UMCS, part of the MQ-25’s Control System & Connectivity (CS&C) segment, is one component of the system. The MQ-25 effort also includes an air segment and a carrier segment. The program plans to release a request for proposal for the air segment this summer and is working shipboard installations for the carrier segment. Operationally, the MQ-25 will provide a robust organic refueling capability to make better use of the Navy’s combat strike fighters and extend the range of the carrier air wing. It will also have a secondary intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability.
:)

.... understanding the requirement for communications and control for the testing period, one wonders if this leads to the "eye in the sky" for "flight following" in the life of these autonomous vehicles? Trundling about the hanger deck, elevators and flight deck following their "deck hand" onto the CAT and off to the autonomous flight and back to the boat and wire with the "deck hand" waiting to take them away.

Does the F-35 pilot take over by saying "Howdy" to get control to improve (speed, heading, altitude??) the inflight fueling, and "Thank You" for release back to autonomy?
:wink:
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Unread post21 Apr 2017, 20:30

Regarding the robot when airborne will know what to do when it is told - no more - no less... on deck - dunno.
U.S. Navy Awards Contracts to Refine MQ-25 Stingray Designs
20 Apr 2017 Bill Carey

"The U.S. Navy has awarded four manufacturers contract amendments with additional funding to refine their concepts for the MQ-25 Stingray refueling drone. The service’s requirements for the aircraft now emphasize the tanking role over multi-mission capability, [so much for JimiHENDRIX claims elsewhere] according to one of the manufacturers....

...Over time, the Navy’s expected requirements for the aircraft have evolved from it being a multi-mission platform capable of performing intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance (ISR) and strike missions to one focused on carrier-based aerial refueling, [OMG] a role the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet now serves. Competing manufacturers expect the service will issue a formal request for proposals this summer.

“It’s a tanker, and that’s pretty well what the Navy has defined as the primary requirement for this unmanned system,” Rob Weiss, [OMG] general manager of Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works advanced development unit, told reporters March 21 during the company’s annual media day. “They’re frankly doing all the right things to accelerate this program and get it in the hands of the warfighter sooner than later. The focus is on mission tanking; [OMG] we’ve done a number of (technology) trade-offs on the actual configuration.”...

...At the media day this year, Weiss displayed a graphic of an underwing pod or tank trailing a hose and refueling drogue to a following F/A-18, hinting at Lockheed Martin’s latest air vehicle configuration. “If (the Navy’s) requirements were about penetrating ISR, where it’s in contested airspace—be it ISR or strike—you would need an airplane that looks different than a concept with pylons,” he said. “But their requirements have now been defined to be a tanker, [OMG] so you really don’t want to go with a tailless design.”"

Graphic:"At its annual media day, Lockheed Martin offered a glimpse of its design for the Navy's MQ-25 Stingray unmanned refueling aircraft." http://www.ainonline.com/sites/default/ ... ngray1.jpg


Source: http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/ ... ay-designs
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A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Unread post22 Apr 2017, 01:41

spazsinbad wrote:......At the media day this year, Weiss displayed a graphic of an underwing pod or tank trailing a hose and refueling drogue to a following F/A-18, hinting at Lockheed Martin’s latest air vehicle configuration. “If (the Navy’s) requirements were about penetrating ISR, where it’s in contested airspace—be it ISR or strike—you would need an airplane that looks different than a concept with pylons,” he said. “But their requirements have now been defined to be a tanker, [OMG] so you really don’t want to go with a tailless design.”"...


1- an underwing pod/ different than a concept with pylons ....why would you possibly design a new a/c to do refueling and require pods with propellers or pylons??
2- engine requirement (one) should be the latest version of the SBug engine with multiple starter/ generators...
3- you really don’t want to go with a tailless design....why???...proved unnecessary by the X-47????
:)
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