Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built!

Unread postPosted: 09 Dec 2011, 05:28
by thestealthfighterguy
It certainly doesn’t look like the typical helicopter you see flying above your city. There’s not one rotor spinning around on top, but two, one spinning clockwise, the other counter-clockwise. And there’s no tail rotor, but a propeller. Together, this is the dynamic advancement that its maker, Sikorsky, says enabled the Sikorsky X2 to recently break the world record for helicopter speed, hitting 250 knots per hour, which is about 280 miles per hour.

“The fact that we have 2 rotors spinning in opposite directions takes away the issues that cause helicopters to only fly to 150 kph, and allow us to go 250,” says Sikorsky President Jeffrey Pino.

Sikorsky put on a world-debut demonstration of it’s X2 prototype, which included a drag race with a standard helicopter, a Bell 407. Needless to say, by the time the Bell reached the finish line 3000 feet down the runway, the X2 was long gone.

The Russians have a similarly designed attack helicopter, the Kamov KA-50, known as the “Black Shark.” It looks similar to the US Army’s Apache, but with 2 rotors stacked above each other. And, as the military is Sikorsky’s primary plan for its new helicopter design, it unveiled its new Raider design, which can seat 6 soldiers, carry gun or missile mounts and serve as a scout helicopter. As of now, there is no Pentagon contract.

Health care experts are also intrigued by the potential of this new twice-as-fast helicopter design, especially in the area of EMS helicopters that you see ferrying critically injured patients to trauma centers for life saving treatment. In the medical community, there is what is known as “the golden hour,” the 60 minutes between injury and treatment. It’s accepted dogma that if you can treat someone in that time, you greatly enhance the chances of the end result being life, not death.

“A fast helicopter matters, whether or not you were shot or you had a car accident or a fall or a burn. Any one of those things, time matters,” says Dr. Nicholas Namias of the University of Miami’s Ryder Trauma Center in downtown Miami.

Sikorsky hopes to have its first military-ready Raiders on the market in about 5 years. As for this technological advancement replacing the single rotor helicopter designs that we all see in our skies, most likely, don’t expect that for a decade or longer.



There's a vid at this link.
http://liveshots.blogs.foxnews.com/2010/10/22/super-helicopter/

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2011, 06:33
by americaneagle
just want to add this up
Image

Unread postPosted: 12 Dec 2011, 20:15
by thestealthfighterguy
Thanks I like it.

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2011, 03:20
by americaneagle
Welcome and thanks too, I like these super copters. It make me feel copters are advancing in terms of technology

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2011, 04:42
by madrat
I like the simplicity. I would think that really would help if they can get it into civilian service first.

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2011, 05:16
by americaneagle
Yeah, this can be a Big help if used properly

Unread postPosted: 13 Dec 2011, 20:45
by thestealthfighterguy
americaneagle wrote:Yeah, this can be a Big help if used properly

Health care experts are also intrigued by the potential of this new twice-as-fast helicopter design, especially in the area of EMS helicopters that you see ferrying critically injured patients to trauma centers for life saving treatment. In the medical community, there is what is known as “the golden hour,” the 60 minutes between injury and treatment. It’s accepted dogma that if you can treat someone in that time, you greatly enhance the chances of the end result being life, not death.


I would like to see this heli ferrying injured combat troops ASAP. Nothing to good for our troops and with all the people getting injured in extream sports in remote places now days this could save alot of life.
Plus, you ask a heli pilot if he wants an extra 100 mph in and out of the LZ. I don't think he would say no.
TSFG

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2012, 06:53
by destroid
Is there a reason these use props instead of jets for lateral propulsion?

Unread postPosted: 26 Apr 2012, 21:14
by southernphantom
destroid wrote:Is there a reason these use props instead of jets for lateral propulsion?


Yes, retreating blade stall occurs with helicopters at high speeds and renders them nearly uncontrollable. Props and a windmilling or contra-rotating rotor system allow far higher safe speeds.

Unread postPosted: 27 Apr 2012, 02:12
by count_to_10
destroid wrote:Is there a reason these use props instead of jets for lateral propulsion?

The maximum velocities involved. Props produce usable thrust more efficiently at sub-sonic velocities than turbojets do (turbofans, like you see on airliners, have the advantage in the transonic range). As even 300 miles per hour is still nowhere near transonic, a prop is the way to go.

Unread postPosted: 30 Aug 2012, 06:09
by discofishing
thestealthfighterguy wrote:
americaneagle wrote:Yeah, this can be a Big help if used properly

Health care experts are also intrigued by the potential of this new twice-as-fast helicopter design, especially in the area of EMS helicopters that you see ferrying critically injured patients to trauma centers for life saving treatment. In the medical community, there is what is known as “the golden hour,” the 60 minutes between injury and treatment. It’s accepted dogma that if you can treat someone in that time, you greatly enhance the chances of the end result being life, not death.


I would like to see this heli ferrying injured combat troops ASAP. Nothing to good for our troops and with all the people getting injured in extream sports in remote places now days this could save alot of life.
Plus, you ask a heli pilot if he wants an extra 100 mph in and out of the LZ. I don't think he would say no.
TSFG



Yeah, this or something of equal capability, perhaps an HV-22 Osprey. Hawks can only hit about 165kts in level speed, but that's ideal conditions. HH-60G Pavehawks used by the USAF are a little bit slower. If something can go 250+ kts, then that would definitely save lives and make the missions safer for the aircrew as well.

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2012, 01:05
by count_to_10
There was some issue about the V-22 not being able to use a side winch, ruling it out for SAR.

Unread postPosted: 31 Aug 2012, 01:57
by madrat
If counter-rotating props is the key, then why not eggbeaters.

Image

This new twist on a helicopter is probably capable of towing other light aircraft into the air. It's probably not fast enough to tow any high speed aircraft, but imagine something the size of a C-27J. It could significantly decrease its takeoff. I wouldn't want to do it everyday, but in an emergency.

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 07:32
by discofishing
The KMAX is a good stable platform, but a more useful platform that uses a similar anti-torque principle called the CH-47 is much better suited. This aircraft is not a new twist on a helicopter. It finds it lineage in the HH-43 Huskie which entered service in the 50s.

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 18:39
by madrat
I was looking at some of the problems with the idea and saw retreating blade pitch is a problem. If there was a way to curve the effective pitch of your blades when retreating and beginning the return trip around - without flapping - you might be able to boost your speeds significantly. In that case you would need to significantly slow rotor tip speed down and probably compensate with an increase in the number of blades. Increasing the airfoil of each blade isn't going to be helpful for flexibility. Nor is much camber in each blade. My first instinct was the bi-plane or tri-plane stacked rotors. The eggbeater, only with the rotors separated out much further, might do it. Minimal camber. Counter rotating each rotor. Amazing complexity. Exotic materials....

Unread postPosted: 11 Sep 2012, 17:05
by discofishing
I've never heard of retreating blade pitch issues. What I have heard of is "retreating blade stalls". In forward flight, there is something called dissymmetry of lift. It's where the advancing blade produces more lift by virtue of its TAS than the retreating blade. If you get going too fast the advancing blade with have so much more lift you'll go into an uncommanded roll.

"The eggbeater, only with the rotors separated out much further, might do it. Minimal camber. Counter rotating each rotor. Amazing complexity. Exotic materials...."
This has already been done in the CH-47 and CH-46. Both aircraft use counter-rotating, inter-meshing rotor systems to defeat retreating blade stall. The CH-47 is the fastest helicopter the US military operates.

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2012, 00:32
by archeman
Nice pics and cool concepts here.

The advancing blade is almost just as big of a problem as the retreating blade stall.
Most rotor blade tips are built to withstand the stress of local supersonic speed when the rotor is in the advancing phase of rotation, however as you keep increasing the speeds the shock waves advance from the tip of the rotor (where you can easily make it very strong w/out being too heavy) down the blade to nearer the middle span where there aren't many easy solutions to keep the blade strong enough and light enough to allow a light transmission/powerplant. 'Weird' harmonics start to take place along the length of the blade span that defy standard remedies and greatly shorten the lifespan of the materials both of the blade, the rotor bearings and pitch control arm joints. I am not privy to the real reasons the Army canceled the Comanche, but I strongly suspect that what played a role was that the materials when subjected to high speed strain were not passing longevity testing.

The dual rotor is part of the solution as it is shortening the blades and placing the high speed bad effects on both sides of the aircraft instead of on a single side. NOTE: This does not actually solve the problems, just masks the effects of those problems on your overall stability.

I would think that if you could find some way to both slow, AND retract the main rotor blades themselves (think of telescoping lenses) as you increase forward speed and transition lift to other fixed wing surfaces you would be better off pushing back (not eliminating) those evil demons that wait beyond 300mph.
That is a complex solution but hey --- if it were easy it would have already been done by now.

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2012, 00:39
by count_to_10
DARPA has a disc-rotor concept that does that:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pg6LuwyNIxk

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2012, 02:35
by archeman
count_to_10 wrote:DARPA has a disc-rotor concept that does that:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pg6LuwyNIxk


Well shucks! :oops:

If it were me developing that craft (which it ISNT), I would make a few changes to the design that my tiny brain sees as reducing unneeded risk.

Why not bring in those wing engines/fans closer to the airframe? It could crowd side door ingress/egress abit but you reduce the main rotor dual drive shaft complexity/length. You also greatly reduce the engine failure recovery problems. I can't tell if the engines are located above the airframe or inside the fans. Anyway. Put the loading area in the back. This is just a test craft anyway right?

Can the wing fans be disabled when in hover mode?

Why not use a conventional tail rotor and boom? Well worn path to follow for helo flighht control development.

That retracting blade disk is actually less complex than what I was thinking. Well played Boeing!

Unread postPosted: 14 Sep 2012, 23:24
by count_to_10
I think it is still a computer model as opposed to a physical prototype. It has to have some way of pushing itself forward, and also needs a way to counter torque.

Unread postPosted: 18 Sep 2012, 04:44
by discofishing
Anyone know how fast the X-49 Speedhawk has gotten up to?

Unread postPosted: 18 Sep 2012, 23:33
by count_to_10
I saw a video that claimed 165 knots.

Unread postPosted: 26 Sep 2012, 06:40
by discofishing
Just about every helicopter in the modern US military arsenal can reach that speed.

Unread postPosted: 06 May 2013, 21:38
by aaam
count_to_10 wrote:There was some issue about the V-22 not being able to use a side winch, ruling it out for SAR.


This is old, I admit, but V-22 winches from the belly or the tail. It does have a pretty potent downwash, true. But then, USAF picked the H-47(!) to be their CSAR bird, until that program collapsed.

Something like the subsequently announced V-280 would be a better fit. Also, unlike other high speed concepts, there's no prop spinning close to the ground for someone to walk into. always a big concern on SAR and EMS missions.

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2013, 09:20
by discofishing
The eggbeater, only with the rotors separated out much further, might do it.


That's basically a Chinook or Sea Knight.

Re: Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 03:39
by tritonprime

Re: Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 03:42
by tritonprime
X2 Technology™ Overview

Uploaded on Jun 3, 2011

The Sikorsky X2 TECHNOLOGY™ demonstrator aircraft will incorporate several new technologies and demonstrate them in a flight environment. These technologies include an integrated Fly-by-Wire system that allows the engine/rotor/propulsor system to operate efficiently, with full control of rotor rpm throughout the flight envelope, high lift-to-drag rigid blades, low drag hub fairings, and Active Vibration Control. In addition, the aircraft will be used as a 'flying wind tunnel' to determine the main rotor to propulsor aerodynamic interaction, shaft angle optimization for performance, and blade tip clearance for a range of maneuvers. This will allow optimization of the X2 TECHNOLOGY™ suite for future products.

Sikorsky is well on its way in completing the design of the X2 TECHNOLOGY™ Demonstrator with important milestones right on the horizon. We are excited about what it means for Sikorsky, and most importantly, what it means for our customers - more options.


Re: Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 04:24
by tritonprime

Re: Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 04:25
by tritonprime

Re: Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 04:26
by tritonprime

Re: Sikorsky's Super Helicopter. The fastest Heli ever built

Unread postPosted: 16 Oct 2015, 04:28
by tritonprime