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Re: RE: Re: RE: DIRCM Vs. human eye

Unread postPosted: 20 Jan 2010, 15:11
by Neno
SpudmanWP wrote:From: http://www.codeonemagazine.com/archives ... index.html

Every F-35 pilot will wear the same Gen II HMD. The lens of the visor is made of strong polycarbonate for impact protection. Pilots will also be able to wear one of two outer visors: a darker, sun-screening visor for a bright day or one with protection against laser eye damage.


Ok, here's the answer i was looking for.
Thank's a lot !

RE: Re: RE: Re: RE: DIRCM Vs. human eye

Unread postPosted: 03 Feb 2010, 14:12
by shep1978
Two choices, Sun visor or Laser Visor? So, am I just being stupid here or does that imply that an F-35 pilot could during daylight hours, if wearing his sun visor be hit and harmed by a laser beam?
This sounds utterly insane, god I hope i'm confused and wrong!

Unread postPosted: 03 Feb 2010, 15:13
by outlaw162
Interesting subject.

Awhile back, I was involved in some testing with lasers in a civil aviation context. This picture might give some perspective on laser versus human eye.

I believe that the picture shows the 50 microwatt (uW) level. We also tested various phases of flight (takeoff, departure, approach, & landing) at the 5 & 15 microwatt levels. This is a civil transport aircraft simulator, although this is how a laser of relatively low strength would affect a typical air-lifter or tanker, for example, a KC-135. Sparkle, obscured visual references, potential temporary flash blindness, etc.

Anything under 1 milliwatt (mW), which is equal to 1000 microwatts, is supposedly eye safe, meaning that no permanent damage will result from a direct exposure. However, anything over 1 mW has the potential to do more than just water your eyes.

My eyes may hold the record for the number of fiber-optic laser hits on unprotected eyes.

OL

(Strangely, laser effects on my unprotected eyes now allow me to see through certain substances like various types of cloth used in clothes.)

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2010, 06:33
by madrat
outlaw162 wrote:(Strangely, laser effects on my unprotected eyes now allow me to see through certain substances like various types of cloth used in clothes.)


Probably less from lasers and you passing through the Red Sun named Rao.

Unread postPosted: 05 Mar 2010, 14:52
by outlaw162
Heh, heh.

I have been faster than a speeding bullet, but I’m still working on the tall building thing.

The real problem is, with all the cell phones now, it’s hard to find a phone booth when you need one.

OL

Unread postPosted: 06 Mar 2010, 17:03
by madrat
LOL

I'm thinking that DIRCM will evolve quickly to the point where its like a mini-CiWS against manpads operators. The F-35, with the way it sensors are fused cohesively, just might make it possible to use the DIRCM offensively and proactively. The way computers have so quickly evolved judging shape recognition you could conceivably automatically single out the manpads operator before he can launch and the pilot just has to give the affirmation to blanket laser designate a 1m^2 area at about eye level. Not an option today, but would be an efficient way to utilize it.

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2010, 10:38
by wdc
..signed up so I could post this ....
The answer is very simple. DIRCM laser wavelengths are in the short-wave and mid-wave IR (infrared) region. These wavelengths are not passed by the cornea so they are no threat to the eye (retina). Power levels are very low, would need to be within a few meters range for laser hazard.