Mikoyan MiG-35

Military aircraft - Post cold war aircraft, including for example B-2, Gripen, F-18E/F Super Hornet, Rafale, and Typhoon.
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lomcovak

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Unread post31 May 2020, 18:40

Revised and updated version of the MiG-29M / M2 and its navalized version K / KUB, the MiG-35 Fulcrum-F differs from its predecessor in various features.

::Video removed by moderator::
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Corsair1963

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Unread post01 Jun 2020, 01:01

FYI- Videos are rarely a good source for information on such subjects. Unless, from a credible military source...(publication)
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hornetfinn

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Unread post01 Jun 2020, 13:43

MiG-35 is what MiG-29 should've been 25 years ago. That's about when F-16 Block 50/52 and last production lot F/A-18C/Ds became operational. MIG-35 has very similar characteristics to those in general. Of course it's good upgrade over MiG-29 and will likely get some interest from countries that can't buy or can't afford Western fighter jets or latest Sukhois. Basically those same countries that are now using MiG-29s.
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mixelflick

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Unread post02 Jun 2020, 14:23

lomcovak wrote:Revised and updated version of the MiG-29M / M2 and its navalized version K / KUB, the MiG-35 Fulcrum-F differs from its predecessor in various features.


Video tells us nothing...

In fact, it's just that - video of the Mig-35 flying. Externally it appears to have a slightly larger wing area, additional internal fuel, and a few extra weapons stations. It's SAID to have Russia's first AESA radar, but for the jets the Russians are procuring themselves - no thrust vectoring engines (although I understand they're an option).

The previous posters nailed it in their comments: This was 20 years ago for Western jets. The systems flying today on Typhoon, Rafale, the F-15EX, F-16V and even Gripen are much better. Sure, it's cheaper than an SU-35 but.... still doesn't even come close to its performance. Most countries buying Russian equipment will likely opt for the SU-35 then, albeit probably fewer of them.

It just seems like a feeble attempt on behalf of Mig to resurrect the Mig-29, giving that airframe a "second chance"...
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talkitron

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Unread post05 Jul 2020, 16:30

The Russian arms industry (and aviation specifically) has had a slow down in exports since 2017. As I also posted in a thread on India, India is going shopping for Russian MiG-29s, which is interesting as Russia itself is not procuring them except for one of its aviation display teams. It is also interesting that these are called MiG-29s, not MiG-35s.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-indi ... SKBN2432E2
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madrat

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Unread post05 Jul 2020, 19:21

Seems backwards to buy MiG-29s when they've performed so poorly. They are desperate to bolster numbers. I don't think MiG-29s would do well against Chinese J-10s at this point, so the only role I imagine they would use them for is as bomb trucks. They could get other options than MiG-29 for that.
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Tiger05

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Unread post05 Jul 2020, 22:34

These MiG-29s will be second hand, not new-build. Rumor is that they are the ex-Algerian MiG-29SMTs that were flown by the Russian AF then retired in 2018 after less than a decade in Russian service following their replacement by Su-30SMs. So in fact they will be third-hand. :)
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weasel1962

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Unread post06 Jul 2020, 01:31

It is logical to assume the Astra will be integrated into the Mig-29UPG and thus retain its A2A role. The 21 Mig-29 will be technically new builds, but assembled from 80s half constructed airframes. Will likely install the Zhuk-ME radar but will wait fo confirmation (see pic).

https://www.livefistdefence.com/2019/02 ... a2019.html

Zhuk-ME.jpg


The question is whether the IAF will use the older RD-33 series 3 engines (18260 lbf thrust) that equip the Mig-29UPG or the newer RD-33MK (19800 lbf thrust) that was fitted to the IN Mig-29Ks, but can also equip the Mig-29M/M2.

80s mig-29 airframes.jpeg
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talkitron

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Unread post06 Jul 2020, 18:08

India is really trying to save money by buying ex-Algerian airframes with presumably a lot of miles on them. Thanks for the info.
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madrat

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Unread post07 Jul 2020, 01:33

If only they could become more like an F/A-18 with some simple refit. But then again they could probably have found actual Hornets to simply refit for around a similar price. Refusing to go with F-16's is really going to hurt the IAF. Sure they cost more, but F-16's that were offered are nearly on par with the Rafale in technology, and may even eclipse it in some ways.
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hythelday

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Unread post08 Jul 2020, 07:19

talkitron wrote:India is really trying to save money by buying ex-Algerian airframes with presumably a lot of miles on them. Thanks for the info.


http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/IAF/Datab ... d=71&qt=TY

18x Air Force Fulcrums lost over time, or about 25% of the original fleet, plus Fulcrums are not exactly known for their extreme longevity and reliability (original engines were rated for less than 1000 hours, and airframes were probably 2000 hours). At this point it's about restocking the dwindling squadrons.
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weasel1962

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Unread post08 Jul 2020, 09:16

Its 18 accidents out of 123 (45 navy + 78 air force) so maybe 15% loss rate which is not too bad for a 40 year old airframe. Its the navy ones crashing that are giving a lot more headache since these are newer airframes.

Russkis claiming 4000 hours for the RD33MKs at least. They like to lure with cheap upfront costs and knock up the spares/maintenance prices that hurts
http://www.klimov.ru/en/production/aircraft/RD-33MK/
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hythelday

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Unread post08 Jul 2020, 09:27

weasel1962 wrote:Its 18 accidents out of 123 (45 navy + 78 air force) so maybe 15% loss rate which is not too bad for a 40 year old airframe. Its the navy ones crashing that are giving a lot more headache since these are newer airframes.

Russkis claiming 4000 hours for the RD33MKs at least. They like to lure with cheap upfront costs and knock up the spares/maintenance prices that hurts
http://www.klimov.ru/en/production/aircraft/RD-33MK/


Yup I was talking Air Force versions specifically. The newer engines might be rated that high, but original ones were 900 hr IIRC. The fact that India kept Fulcrums flying that long is quite a feat. The fact that they are going for used ones and not 4++++++ gen MiG-35s pretty much means they are not looking to invest in a new type but rather revitalize old squadrons until Tejas or whatever their plan for a light-ish fighter arrives in numbers.
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weasel1962

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Unread post08 Jul 2020, 09:44

No one else offering 21 fighters for 7,418 crore or ~US$47m each in that timeline (yup, I'm pointing at HAL).
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basher54321

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Unread post09 Aug 2020, 15:18


Almost four years on from the MiG-35’s first flight, there’s no sign of the hoped-for large-scale orders for the warplane from the Russian Defense Ministry. The Fulcrum-F — described by the manufacturer as a “Gen 4++” fighter — had been slated to begin frontline squadron service around mid-2020, but to date, Russia has purchased only six examples.

The latest iteration of the Fulcrum, which is based on the standard MiG-29's 43-year-old Cold War-era design, entered development in 2014 thanks to defense ministry funding ready to meet a domestic requirement, but the fighter is still undergoing its mandated state flight-test campaign. It had been hoped that trials would be completed by late 2018 or early 2019, after which Moscow would place an order for at least 30 aircraft.

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/3 ... -dead-duck
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