Turkish Engine Industries Develops first TurboJet Engine

Military aircraft - Post cold war aircraft, including for example B-2, Gripen, F-18E/F Super Hornet, Rafale, and Typhoon.
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airforces_freak

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Unread post19 Sep 2016, 04:00



Brief summary of the TEI TJ90

To be used for Small UAV's and Missiles;
Technology demonstrator for larger TurboJet Engines;
Tested for 25 Hours;
Control Units also developed in-house
Blisk-Spools also developed and produced in-house

Meanwhile KALE-KALIP has produced a much larger Turbo-Jet engine for the SOM ALCM.

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Baby steps but looks like Turkish Industry is making progress.
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madrat

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Unread post19 Sep 2016, 04:29

90 pounds of thrust
They can only scale it up so far. Maybe they want an indigenous MiG-19?
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collimatrix

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Unread post19 Sep 2016, 10:36

IIRC, Turkey has long held a license to manufacture J79s, and I think F110s somewhat more recently.

This is actually big news. How many other countries can make gas turbines of their own design? Israel can't. Sweden can't.

But baby steps. The specific fuel consumption is pretty bad. 1.5 lb/lbf*hr is quite a bit worse than a J85 at .97.
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airforces_freak

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Unread post19 Sep 2016, 12:06

madrat wrote:90 pounds of thrust
They can only scale it up so far. Maybe they want an indigenous MiG-19?


You haven't paid attention to the video.

The TEI TJ 90 is not being developed for use in combat aircraft. Thats not the objective. TEI is specifically developing it for UAV's and Small missiles.

In fact, Turkish media is reporting that this particular engine will be used in an indigenous "Kamikaze UAV" that Turkish Aerospace Industries is developing. It will be similar to the Harpy and Harop Attack drone and equivalents. It is a derivative of TAI's ŞİMŞEK High Speed Target Drone.

The KALE Aero TurboJet engine is similar to the TJ90 and will be used for the SOM ALCM.

The Specifications for the KALE Aero TurboJet engine is:

Length: 72 cm
Diameter: 30 cm
Dry Weight: < 5o kg
Specific Fuel Consumption (SEC): < or = 1.2 kg/daN/hr
Compressor: Various configuration options- 4 stage axial, 5 stage axial and 1 axial and 1 radial compressor combination.
Turbine: Single Stage
Fuel Type: JP8, JP10
Lubrication System: Grease Pack or fuel lubrication
Generator: Permanent magnet based generator will be mounted on the engine shaft.
Maximum Thrust: 3.0 - 3.6 kN (680 lbf – 810 lbw).



The SOM Missile is designed and produced by Roketsan of Turkey and marketed by Lockheed Martin for F-35 Users

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What this means is that Turkey can now export the SOM missile to any country it likes as it does not need third-party export approval for the engine.
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tmofarrvl

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Unread post19 Sep 2016, 12:19

collimatrix wrote:IIRC, Turkey has long held a license to manufacture J79s, and I think F110s somewhat more recently.

While I can appreciate your enthusiasm for your home team, a "license to manufacture" is usually little more than a "license to assemble." None of the major manufacturers is going to be willing to share hot section manufacturing technologies (nor would U.S. or European export laws allow them to).

collimatrix wrote:How many other countries can make gas turbines of their own design? Israel can't. Sweden can't.

Actually, Israel has been developing and producing its own jet engines for decades, including the 800 lb thrust Sorek 4 engine which equips the Delilah loitering munition.

No one should mistake the ability to produce a small missile engine, however, with the ability to develop and produce a modern jet fighter engine. China, with all of the billions that they've thrown at this challenge, still needs to import jet engines from Russia. The technology is orders of magnitude removed from small missile engines such as these.
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airforces_freak

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Unread post19 Sep 2016, 12:30

tmofarrvl wrote:
collimatrix wrote:IIRC, Turkey has long held a license to manufacture J79s, and I think F110s somewhat more recently.

While I can appreciate your enthusiasm for your home team, a "license to manufacture" is usually little more than a "license to assemble." None of the major manufacturers is going to be willing to share hot section manufacturing technologies (nor would U.S. or European export laws allow them to).

collimatrix wrote:How many other countries can make gas turbines of their own design? Israel can't. Sweden can't.

Actually, Israel has been developing and producing its own jet engines for decades, including the 800 lb thrust Sorek 4 engine which equips the Delilah loitering munition.

No one should mistake the ability to produce a small missile engine, however, with the ability to develop and produce a modern jet fighter engine. China, with all of the billions that they've thrown at this challenge, still needs to import jet engines from Russia. The technology is orders of magnitude removed from small missile engines such as these.


Since you prima facie have some knowledge on turbofan/turboJet engines I direct your attention to this website and ask you to peruse through it: https://www.tei.com.tr/sayfalar/sayfa/p ... orselH:124

Turkish Engine Industries has been PRODUCING (machining, fabricating and welding) critical pieces for GE, Pratt & Whitney, Rolls Royce etc engine programs. Not just ASSEMBLING as you state.

You can find a detailed list of international engine programs TEI has produced critical parts for: https://www.tei.com.tr/sayfalar/sayfa/p ... dules.html
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collimatrix

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Unread post20 Sep 2016, 04:15

tmofarrvl wrote:
collimatrix wrote:IIRC, Turkey has long held a license to manufacture J79s, and I think F110s somewhat more recently.

While I can appreciate your enthusiasm for your home team, a "license to manufacture" is usually little more than a "license to assemble." None of the major manufacturers is going to be willing to share hot section manufacturing technologies (nor would U.S. or European export laws allow them to).


Oh good lord, I've been mistaken for a Turkish nationalist. Whelp, I guess it's time for me to start denying the Armenian genocide and insisting that Kurdish is actually not an Indo-European language and that the Japanese are actually all Muslims.

Actually, I know about the Turkish manufacture of J79s because I have a friend who worked at GE during the time they were offloading their production of parts and support of the engine to Turkey.

Actually, Israel has been developing and producing its own jet engines for decades, including the 800 lb thrust Sorek 4 engine which equips the Delilah loitering munition.


Interesting, thanks. [url="http://www.epicos.com/EPCompanyProfileWeb/Content/BET_Shemesh_Engines_Ltd/Bet_Shemesh_Engines_presentation.pdf"]It looks like BET Shemesh is a subcontractor for a number of engine makers.[/url]
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collimatrix

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Unread post22 Sep 2016, 17:44

tmofarrvl wrote:
collimatrix wrote:IIRC, Turkey has long held a license to manufacture J79s, and I think F110s somewhat more recently.

While I can appreciate your enthusiasm for your home team, a "license to manufacture" is usually little more than a "license to assemble."



My home team? Oh good Lord, I've been mistaken for a Turkish nationalist.

Whelp, time to start ranting about how nothing happened to the Armenians at all about one hundred years ago, and besides even if something did happen they totally deserved it. Also, Kurdish definitely isn't an Indo-European language, it's obviously a dialect of Turkish. Also, the Japanese are converting in droves to Islam as we speak, and are totally going to team up with the resurgent Ottoman Empire to stick it to the Russians.

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