Japan unveils first stealth fighter

Military aircraft - Post cold war aircraft, including for example B-2, Gripen, F-18E/F Super Hornet, Rafale, and Typhoon.
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Corsair1963

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Unread post11 Feb 2020, 05:16

USAF looks to beef up Asia-Pacific partnerships

By Greg Waldron, Singapore|9 February 2020

The US Air Force is placing a high priority on developing partnerships with regional air forces in the areas of procurement, training, and support.

Kelli Seybolt, deputy under secretary of the Air Force for international affairs, plays a prominent role in working with the USA’s international partners.

She points out that the Asia-Pacific has significant security issues, and is also a key part of the global economy.

“Challenges in the region could have big effects on the global economy, so security is paramount to securing the economic benefits of the region and the trade relationships. So, the Pacific is a high priority for us,” she says. ”We have many security commitments here as well.”

In addition to working with important long-term partners, such as Japan and South Korea, the USAF is working to develop deeper relationships with air forces in countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam.

Efforts with Vietnam include the possible provision of Beechcraft T-6 Texan trainers, as well as improving the English proficiency of air force personnel. The Philippines is also in the market for new fighters, with the Lockheed Martin F-16 in contention.

One challenge is the amount of technology transfer that countries desire in defense acquisitions.

Seybolt says that finding the right balance is important, but stresses that the degree of technology shared is “not necessarily static.”

Perhaps one of the region’s biggest technology transfer projects is Tokyo’s FX future fighter program to replace the Mitsubishi F-2. In addition to considerable indigenous work, including the X-2 demonstrator aircraft, Japan’s Acquisition, Technology, & Logistics Agency is looking at several options for the aircraft, which is likely to include working with either US or European partners.

”Japan has approached us regarding their FX program to replace the F-2 and the United States government’s position is that we want to work with Japan to help them create an interoperable capability,” says Seybolt.

“And our desire is that the fighter they want to develop will be interoperable with our capabilities…we’re open to Japan working with industry to formulate some partnerships, so that Japan can gain the benefit of some of what our industry has learned.”


https://www.flightglobal.com/singapore- ... 23.article
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Corsair1963

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Unread post09 Mar 2020, 03:33

What have I been saying....That Japan would join with a partner or partners to develop a future 6th Generation Fighter. Which, most likely would be the US.


Japan's next-gen fighter to be built with US, not UK

Tokyo will shoulder most of the development cost for F-2 successor

RIEKO MIKI, Nikkei staff writer
March 06, 2020 02:00 JST


TOKYO -- Japan plans to choose the U.S. as its partner for developing the successor to the F-2 fighter jet, while taking on most of the R&D costs to avoid leaving essential design information solely in American hands again, Nikkei has learned.

Tokyo was weighing the U.S. offer against a U.K. proposal that would have guaranteed it the freedom to update the new planes at will. But ultimately, it decided to stick with its top ally given that their security ties have significantly expanded in scope in recent years. An official decision will made within this year.

"Ensuring we can freely modify and upgrade [the new jets] in the future is extremely important," Defense Minister Taro Kono said. Japan's inability to freely update the F-2 has limited the usability of much of its fleet.


Japan's defense industry is envisioned as playing the central role in the project, which is expected to cost tens of billions of dollars. Deployment of the new jets is now slated for the mid-2030s.

The government has been in talks with the U.S. and U.K. on the project since last summer, with American contractors Lockheed Martin and Boeing and London-based BAE Systems named as possible partners.

The move toward the American bid comes amid deepening defense cooperation between Tokyo and Washington. As joint defense exercises between the two expand both in number and in content, Tokyo needs more advanced tactical networks that are compatible with those used by the U.S. military. A Defense Ministry proposal for the jet project last year cited the need for interoperability.

Japan looks to create a completely new manned aircraft, opting against a Lockheed Martin proposal for a hybrid of the F-22 and F-35. Tokyo will stick with domestic development for the plane's mission systems, which control such crucial equipment as radar, sensors and electronic warfare gear. It will not limit itself to a single American partner company.

Japan opted against picking the U.K. as a main partner for the project, concluding that even a three-way arrangement would not let the Japan-U.S. alliance maintain its technological edge.

But it does look to share technology with London, which is working on its own next-generation fighter, the Tempest, and has inquired about working with Tokyo on developing systems and electronic components.

On the domestic side, Japanese companies have begun research into high-output engines and powerful but compact radar systems that can detect stealth fighters. Participants in the project are expected to include Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Toshiba and IHI.

The plan could take some twists and turns before Tokyo makes the final call. Japan was initially set to lead development of the F-2 when the project first came up in the 1980s, but the U.S. took over as trade tensions between the allies led Washington to pressure Tokyo to buy American.

As a result, design details of components considered to be sensitive were not disclosed to the Japanese side, hamstringing its ability to modify the jets on its own.

U.S. President Donald Trump, who has demanded that Japan take on more the cost of hosting American troops, has reportedly expressed interest in the new project. Negotiators will continue working to hammer out each side's share of the development costs as well as production.


https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Aerosp ... o33CJSBBdM
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mixelflick

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Unread post09 Mar 2020, 18:04

I really can't see them coming up with something that out-performs the F-35 (at least as an all around strike fighter).

I could see it out-performing the F-35 in some narrow parts of the envelope, but not in the more critical ones. The odds it'll be stealthier? Not good. Faster? Perhaps. Better sensors/SA? Unlikely.

When it's all said and done, they should just put these funds to use buying more F-35's. As new, more powerful engines,radar, sensors, AAM's etc become available it'll be easy to update. There's an entire worldwide enterprise devoted to making the F-35 even better than it is now.

The same can't be said about whatever aircraft they come up with...
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Unread post10 Mar 2020, 08:02

mixelflick wrote:I really can't see them coming up with something that out-performs the F-35 (at least as an all around strike fighter).

I could see it out-performing the F-35 in some narrow parts of the envelope, but not in the more critical ones. The odds it'll be stealthier? Not good. Faster? Perhaps. Better sensors/SA? Unlikely.

When it's all said and done, they should just put these funds to use buying more F-35's. As new, more powerful engines,radar, sensors, AAM's etc become available it'll be easy to update. There's an entire worldwide enterprise devoted to making the F-35 even better than it is now.

The same can't be said about whatever aircraft they come up with...



Japan will likely by more F-35's as time goes on. While, joining with a partner or partners to jointly develop a future 6th Generation Fighter. Honestly, this is nothing new..........(as I have been saying)
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Unread post10 Mar 2020, 12:22

Japan's industrial bases needs a super duper option available in a decade. 2030 is already predicted to be the most contested set of global circumstances since the early 1900's. There is bound to be regional contests for resources when global cooling cycle is in full effect and all of the budget crunches reach their apex that year. They don't want to get caught with their pants down.
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Unread post10 Mar 2020, 17:29

I doubt the new Japanese fighter will be same as PCA. Japan mainly wants stealth and loiter for defending airspace, while PCA is more about speed and broadband stealth to penetrate air defense, so their main missions are probably different. I can see technology being transferred but I don't think they will be the same airframe.
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Corsair1963

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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 01:07

Honestly, I think the odds are very good that Japan will join the PCA or another 6th Generation Fighter Program. As they don't have much of the technology needed to develop a 6th Generation Fighter. Nor, the will to spend the vast sums necessary to go solo. Which, leaves them little other option....
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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 01:41



This was sourced from Reuters on Mar 27.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-japa ... SKBN21E137

Exclusive: Japan favors home-grown design for next-generation fighter after rejecting foreign plans: sources

TOKYO (Reuters) - Japan wants to develop a stealth fighter domestically, rejecting designs from Lockheed Martin Corp and Boeing Co in the United States and Britain’s BAE Systems PLC, three sources with knowledge of the program told Reuters.

That would put Japan’s leading defense contractor, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, in the lead for a military contract worth more than $40 billion. The company has not submitted a design for the next-generation fighter, but developed Japan’s stealth fighter technology demonstrator, the X-2, in 2016.

“Japan’s stealth designs have performed well in tests so far,” said one of the sources, who has knowledge of discussion about the new proposed plane, referred to as the F-3 or F-X.

A spokesman for Mitsubishi Heavy said the company would work with the government on whatever policy it decided to follow.

“We understand the Japanese government will lead the development program,” a Mitsubishi Heavy spokesman said.

Japan’s Air Self Defense Force flies about 200 Boeing F-15 jets and is replacing squadrons of decades-old F-4 fighters with Lockheed Martin F-35s. The F-3 will succeed the F-2, a derivative of the F-16 Fighting Falcon jointly developed by Mitsubishi Heavy and Lockheed Martin more than two decades ago.

Proposals from Lockheed, Boeing and BAE “were judged not to have met our needs,” said an official at the Japanese defense ministry’s Acquisition, Technology & Logistics Agency (ATLA). “No decision has yet been reached on the airframe,” he added.

After settling on the airframe - the aircraft itself without the systems that make it fly - Japan’s government will select suppliers for the engine, flight systems, sensors and other components that will give the proposed jet its advanced capabilities, the sources said.

All three spoke on condition of anonymity because the were not authorized to speak to the media.

For many of the systems, Tokyo will need help from foreign companies to reduce development costs and time, ensuring it can deploy the fighter in the next decade to counter Chinese expansion in East Asia.

U.S companies, including Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Northrop Grumman, are still potential partners, the sources said.

“Lockheed Martin is encouraged by the ongoing dialogue between the U.S. Government and Government of Japan regarding Japan’s F-2 replacement plans, and is looking forward to detailed discussions with Japanese industry,” Lockheed Martin said in an email. It had proposed an aircraft combining elements of its F-22 and F-35 stealth jets.

“Boeing is committed to partnering with Japan to support development of a Japan-led, next-generation future fighter,” said a spokesman from Boeing, which had offered Japan a design based on its F-18 Super Hornet jet.

Northrop Grumman is “engaged in frequent dialogue with Japan’s Ministry of Defense and Japanese industry in support of the F-X program,” a company spokesman said. Northrop Grumman did not submit an airframe proposal.

The United States, which has about 50,000 troops in Japan, including as an aircraft carrier strike group, remains the cornerstone of Tokyo’s defense policy. U.S. President Donald Trump wants Japan to pay more for that protection and reduce its trade surplus with the United States.

Japan is seeking deeper security ties elsewhere, including with Britain, which is courting Japan as a possible partner on its proposed next-generation jet, the Tempest. If built, it would deploy in the 2030s.
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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 01:47

Nothing new there as Japan rejected a F-22/F-35 hybrid and upgraded Super Hornet sometime ago....
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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 05:24

If they decide to go with an F-22 sized fighter, they will likely have to team with PW. They will need 2 F-119,s
Or F-135s. I have a few questions:

1.We know that the F-22 is mostly off limits but what about the engine?
2.Could the US. Encourage Japan to take the F-135, or 136? Wouldn't this also help japan by having a swappable engine?
3. What kind of monster of a Machine could you build
Around 2 F-135 sized engines? Your talking about nearly 60k lbs of thrust just dry! The engines will dictate the fighters size and capability. It seems short sighted to build the frame 1st.
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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 05:51

jessmo112 wrote:If they decide to go with an F-22 sized fighter, they will likely have to team with PW. They will need 2 F-119,s
Or F-135s. I have a few questions:

1.We know that the F-22 is mostly off limits but what about the engine?
2.Could the US. Encourage Japan to take the F-135, or 136? Wouldn't this also help japan by having a swappable engine?
3. What kind of monster of a Machine could you build
Around 2 F-135 sized engines? Your talking about nearly 60k lbs of thrust just dry! The engines will dictate the fighters size and capability. It seems short sighted to build the frame 1st.



Japan can barely afford all of the F-35's she wants. So, hard for me to see her developing a solo program. Even with some US Technology. Which, is why I believe she will join with am existing 6th Generation Fighter Program. (most likely PCA)


"IMHO"
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pron

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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 07:09

Corsair1963 wrote:
jessmo112 wrote:If they decide to go with an F-22 sized fighter, they will likely have to team with PW. They will need 2 F-119,s
Or F-135s. I have a few questions:

1.We know that the F-22 is mostly off limits but what about the engine?
2.Could the US. Encourage Japan to take the F-135, or 136? Wouldn't this also help japan by having a swappable engine?
3. What kind of monster of a Machine could you build
Around 2 F-135 sized engines? Your talking about nearly 60k lbs of thrust just dry! The engines will dictate the fighters size and capability. It seems short sighted to build the frame 1st.



Japan can barely afford all of the F-35's she wants. So, hard for me to see her developing a solo program. Even with some US Technology. Which, is why I believe she will join with am existing 6th Generation Fighter Program. (most likely PCA)


"IMHO"

Not so sure, but it's difficult to tell anything about the future. Things have changed a lot just the few last weeks.

Japan's next-gen fighter to be built with US, not UK
Tokyo will shoulder most of the development cost for F-2 successor.
https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Aerosp ... o33CJSBBdM
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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 07:55

jessmo112 wrote:If they decide to go with an F-22 sized fighter, they will likely have to team with PW. They will need 2 F-119,s Or F-135s.


They have been developing their own engines for the past few years already. The testing of the demo engines are scheduled to have completed last month. Google XF-9 engine.

As to anyone who thinks Japan can't afford it... it has been budgeted.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Japan- ... on-new-jet
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Unread post06 Apr 2020, 08:04

pron wrote:Not so sure, but it's difficult to tell anything about the future. Things have changed a lot just the few last weeks.

Japan's next-gen fighter to be built with US, not UK
Tokyo will shoulder most of the development cost for F-2 successor.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Aerosp ... o33CJSBBdM


Japan's current Defense Budget is pushed to the limit now. Plus, add the staggering cost of the current Coronavirus Crisis to that. Just don't see it happening....

Your talking about a 6th Generation Fighter Program on the scale of the F-22.... :shock:
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