F-16 crashes off coast of South Carolina

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 01:28
by mud_ninja84
Shaw Air Force Base April 5, 2006 - An F-16 from Shaw Air Force Base crashed Wednesday about 30 miles off the coast of South Carolina.

The fighter jet crashed around 5:40pm. At the time of the accident, it was participating in a training mission. One person was on board.

Another F-16 was flying at the time. That pilot says he saw the airman eject from the crashing plane with a good chute.

Circling the scene, the pilot watched the airman hit the water.

At this point Shaw says they don't know whether the pilot survived, and that the Coast Guard is on the scene trying to rescue the airmen.

It's too early to tell why the plane crashed.

A board of officers will investigate the accident

Source: WISTV.com

Also see: http://www.f-16.net/news_article1734.html

RE: F-16 crashes off coast of South Carolina

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 01:51
by mikebennett
Wednesday 5th April 2006 5:40 p.m. USAF F-16CJ ??? believed to be from 20th Fighter Wing Shaw Air Force Base On training mission from Shaw AFB. Crashed in the Atlantic Ocean, about 30 miles off the coast of South Carolina Pilot ejected using ACES II and rescued from the water around 7:35 p.m., about two hours after the crash

regards

Mike Bennett
Project Get Out and Walk
www.ejection-history.org.uk

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 02:05
by mud_ninja84
Yeah, block 50. Thanks for letting us know that the pilot is alright!

WIStv News Update

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 03:15
by GoldDelta
Shaw Air Force Base - April 5, 2006 - The Coast Guard says the pilot of an F-16 fighter jet that crashed Wednesday in the Atlantic Ocean about 35 miles off Myrtle Beach has been found alive.

Petty Officer Bobby Nash says the pilot, Captain Ted Shultz with the 55th Fighter Squadron, was found about two hours after the crash. He appeared to be in stable condition.

Air Force Lieutenant Bryan Cox says the jet was on a training mission from Shaw Air Force Base when it went down around 5:40pm.

It's too early to tell why the plane crashed.

A board of officers will investigate the accident.

Updated 9:20pm by Chantelle Janelle

Source: WISTV.com

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 03:18
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
Dang.....3 writeoffs in 3 weeks. Looking like a safety stand down. Thank God nobody has been killed in the last 3, and in case we don't say it enough, God bless you people who hang it out there for us, and the people who support them in maintenance and egress.


Off topic a bit, but man....is it just me or is 2 hours sound like an awfully long time to be in the water 30 miles offshore in our own ocean with all the SAR assets we have on the east coast?

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 05:00
by cchief16
if this gets out, im sure the airforce will never let me PCS...ever. currently at Hill AFB, leaving for Kunsan with a follow-on to Shaw. its gotta be some bad ju-ju or something.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 06:54
by swanee
AfterburnerDecalsScott wrote:Dang.....3 writeoffs in 3 weeks. Looking like a safety stand down. Thank God nobody has been killed in the last 3, and in case we don't say it enough, God bless you people who hang it out there for us, and the people who support them in maintenance and egress.


Off topic a bit, but man....is it just me or is 2 hours sound like an awfully long time to be in the water 30 miles offshore in our own ocean with all the SAR assets we have on the east coast?


I can tell you now that 2 hours in the atlantic can result in hypothermia pretty easily. Just a couple weeks ago, at a college sailing regatta, we had a guy fall in about 1.5 miles off the coast of Virginia. He was in the water for about 45 minutes and spent the next couple of days in the hospital with hypothermia...

But yeah, 2 hours seems like a long time to me.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 07:19
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
I'm wondering if he was lost or what exactly, I mean you'd imagine they'd have a pretty good fix on him if he was able to bail out......10-15 minutes to warm up the helos, it's only 30 miles out there. You'd figure his wingman would have CAP'd him.

Is there a raft in the seat?

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 07:30
by Destro
Yeah, the kit has a one man raft, and he shoud have had a "poopy suit" on if the temp was low enough to warrant it.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 11:11
by Bjorn
Anyone has info on the serial? Obvious question from my part :-)

Greets,

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 13:33
by rickpump76
Rumor has it that is was <a href="f-16_fighting_falcon_airframe-4011.html">93-3542</a>... It used to be my jet when I was at Shaw a few years ago. Too bad it was a pretty good flyer.

Too many jets going down these days. Maybe it has something to do with all the force shaping and higher ops tempo these days. Too much work and not enough people. Just throwing that out there.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 14:05
by blk40crewdawg
Dang.....3 writeoffs in 3 weeks.


Always heard the superstition that acft accidents happen in 3's. Especially 16's...

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 14:27
by LinkF16SimDude
AfterburnerDecalsScott wrote:I mean you'd imagine they'd have a pretty good fix on him if he was able to bail out......10-15 minutes to warm up the helos, it's only 30 miles out there. You'd figure his wingman would have CAP'd him.


Article says his wingie did loiter but depending on where the SAR assets are comin' from it could take that long to get there. Still lookin' to see what CG Rescue units are closeby.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 15:43
by Ex-Chief
Hey all, Ex F-16 Crew Chief here.

[edit]

Shaw recalled all aircraft save for 3 that diverted to Charleston and 3 that stayed out there, we then launched out two more to replace the others since they were running out of fuel. This was the last go of the day during a pretty heavy week of flying. They had been pitting all week and today I haven't heard too much flying.

As you can imagine, we were getting bombarded with calls about whether the pilot had been recovered in the minutes after the accident, but it took about 30 to 40 minutes for the coast guard to show up. The aircraft went down in the Doubleshot Airspace of W177B about 30 miles from the coast.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 15:55
by JanHas
If I'm correct, all three are GE engined machines.. a pattern? :wtf:

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 16:11
by Guysmiley
We'll have to wait for the investigation results to know if it was an engine related issue.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 16:16
by elp
Damn. Seat and life support peeps don't need any extra motivation to do their job well. Good grief.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 16:20
by blk40crewdawg
Even if it was an engine issue, 75% of all C/D models have GE engines...so that would mean a higher percentage of GE related issues...Pratt had a run of bad luck with their engines at Luke a few years back. It could happen to either....

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 16:27
by Aramount
this week was probably the most flying (outside of a phaseII) ive seen on this base in the past 2 years that ive been here, really doesnt suprise me that a jet went down when the amu's are struggling to meet crew shows with the manning they have.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 16:30
by RoAF
If I'm correct, all three are GE engined machines.. a pattern?


Not a pattern, just pure statistic rules applied in the real world. We all know that about 3/4 of the C/D fleet is equipped with GE engines. So if you have more of them, it's more likely that when one goes down it's a GE equipped (75% chance)

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 18:02
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
but it took about 30 to 40 minutes for the coast guard to show up.


To the base, or over the pilot? I noticed the article said a navy ship fished him out, but saw the news footage that showed them offloading him from a helo. Still incredulous about the 2 hour thing.....30-40 minutes sounds more reasonable.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 18:28
by Storms24
Any word on the status of the pilot?? Heard RUMINT that he suffered broken bones & hypothermia....

Springfield, IL

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 20:18
by BlueFoxGuitar
Used to work at Shaw back when 542 was still part of the 78th (helped to move the all the assets down to the 55th). It was a good jet to crew, even thought it wasn't mine. Hey Pump, used to work with you, been quite a while, how ya doin?

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 22:49
by Lieven
Storms24 wrote:Any word on the status of the pilot?? Heard RUMINT that he suffered broken bones & hypothermia...


The Coast Guard said the pilot suffered broken legs, facial cuts and a broken wrist.

See: http://www.f-16.net/news_article1737.html

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 23:01
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
Making more sense now......he was in the water with a rescue swimmer for a piece until the squids showed up.....I knew that whole time frame seemed off. I couldn't imagine it took the coasties 2 hours to find him.

So, I also read where the area where he went down was cleared for supersonic speed....and article spicer, or was he sonic or near sonic when he bailed I wonder?

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 23:04
by mud_ninja84
Yeah, we were surging this week. Undermanned and overworked. 4 go's avg. 14 ea. per squadron avg. I don't know whether or not this was a maintenance mistake. I doubt it was a pilot error, but it's probable to be a wtf.

Rumor has it that he was going 700kts when he bailed! Reason still unknown, but I'd punch out if my surfaces weren't working right...

Not only was he in for 2 hours, but he had multiple injuries - it's amazing this pilot didn't go into shock from his fractures and go under!

BTW, this explains the bullet theory on the navy ship and coastie chopper:
http://wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S=4735656

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 23:05
by akruse21
Ex-Chief wrote:I have cross trained to Airfield Management and I was on duty at Shaw yesterday when the accident happened. I can confirm that the Tail was 542, the callsign was Brag21. We got the call from tower at around 1745 and called out the crash net.

Shaw recalled all aircraft save for 3 that diverted to Charleston and 3 that stayed out there, we then launched out two more to replace the others since they were running out of fuel. This was the last go of the day during a pretty heavy week of flying. They had been pitting all week and today I haven't heard too much flying.

As you can imagine, we were getting bombarded with calls about whether the pilot had been recovered in the minutes after the accident, but it took about 30 to 40 minutes for the coast guard to show up. The aircraft went down in the Doubleshot Airspace of W177B about 30 miles from the coast.

Personal tidbit here: This is the fourth accident I have been involved in, in some way. I did the intake inspections on 2006 and 2111 before they went down at Hill in 2002 and I was on duty in Base Ops when the last Shaw jet went down last year. I think I am bad luck.


The 15 that went down here in 01 was launched out by the same guy who is the DCC and launched out the last jet to go down here a couple of months ago. Now that's luck.

Unread postPosted: 06 Apr 2006, 23:19
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
rumor has it that he was going 700kts when he bailed! reason still unknown, but i'd punch out if my surfaces weren't working right...


That would explain the flail injuries then....holy smokes!

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2006, 18:58
by LinkF16SimDude
700 knots?!! YEESHHH! Brings back recollections of the Mudhen crew that punched out above the Mach. Man...that hadda hurt!

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2006, 19:38
by RoAF
Brings back recollections of the Mudhen crew that punched out above the Mach. Man...that hadda hurt!


Actually the guy in the back seat lost his life on that one. They ejected at over 780 mph.

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2006, 20:16
by Guysmiley
700 knots is like 805 mph. And ouch. :(

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 00:14
by mud_ninja84
Today, our amxs commander confirmed that it was over 700kts.

OUCH is right!

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 07:57
by Lieven
You will all be happy to know Captain Shultz is doing well and was just fitted in a back brace so that he can sit up now.

One more leg surgery to go!

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 08:13
by TenguNoHi
Very happy. Thanks for the update Lieven.

-Aaron

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 12:37
by mud_ninja84
Great! I hope he recovers 100% soon! If anyone knows him on a personal basis, please let him know that all of the AMUs respect his courage and determination.

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 12:41
by vinnie
Off topic a bit, but man....is it just me or is 2 hours sound like an awfully long time to be in the water 30 miles offshore in our own ocean with all the SAR assets we have on the east coast?


I think the closest USCG air station would have been Savannah,Ga. Moody has no alert for it's helos at home station that I know of. What other assets are there close? I think they did not want to risk a basket recovery because of his injuries.

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 14:18
by LinkF16SimDude
vinnie wrote:Off topic a bit, but man....is it just me or is 2 hours sound like an awfully long time to be in the water 30 miles offshore in our own ocean with all the SAR assets we have on the east coast?


True. But low, late evening sun angles can make spotting a person in the water very difficult, even with a dye marker. If the sea state was high enough (moderately choppy) it may have dispersed that as to an extent that it was ineffective. And with his injuries it may have been impossible to activate his EPRB (a radio homing beacon, which I think is included in the kit) to give the SAR guys something to home in on. Does anyone know what color the raft is? International Yellow or Orange? That could have helped.

This all speculative of course. The Coasties are the best in the world at this sorta thing so if they say it was a difficult grab, I'm more than happy to defer to them. :thumb:

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 15:05
by egresstroop
The coastie helo came from Charleston...

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 21:36
by #9
Shaw and I'm sure other bases are hurting right now because of the reshaping. Not a whole lot of CJRs are being given. That might be something to think of. Long hours and less manning.

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 21:51
by vinnie
Still undermanned and limiting CJR's, Things in the 16 world never change. Are they offering $$ to get out yet?

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 22:29
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
This all speculative of course. The Coasties are the best in the world at this sorta thing so if they say it was a difficult grab, I'm more than happy to defer to them.


Yeah, after better info came out, the CG was on scene in like 40 minutes with a swimmer in the water, and because of his injiuies they waiting for the navy ship. 40 minutes is right in there with what you'd expect that close into shore from Charleston. Wasn't ragging on the coasties, mote the media reports, which are hardly accurate on anything at first.

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2006, 22:45
by shiz302
When the aircrew has to eject going so fast, I guess the option of scrubbin off airspeed before you punch out isn't there huh?

Unread postPosted: 09 Apr 2006, 00:47
by vinnie
Wonder if he G Loc'd and came to and punched, happened a few times at MacDill, some made it , some didn't. Maybe the airframe started to come apart, he either did not know how fast he was or had to get out quick no matter what the airspeed was.

Unread postPosted: 09 Apr 2006, 13:59
by egresstroop
vinnie wrote:Wonder if he G Loc'd and came to and punched, happened a few times at MacDill, some made it , some didn't. Maybe the airframe started to come apart, he either did not know how fast he was or had to get out quick no matter what the airspeed was.


Thats the most dominant rumor going around the base right now...

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2006, 06:52
by AfterburnerDecalsScott
I got this from the XO of the ship that picked him up directly. Good call by the rescue swimmers. Towards the end, I'm sure they meant hypOthermia, which in this case is not entirely bad, as the cold slows the metabolic functions down and bleeding is not as profuse. You can lose a bunch of blood from just 1 fx leg....2 is a really big deal.

Naval Station Mayport-based frigate USS KLAKRING (FFG 42) rescued a U.S. Air Force pilot from the Atlantic Ocean on Wednesday (April 5th). The pilot, who ejected from his F-16 fighter jet before it smashed into the ocean, was rescued by KLAKRING crewmembers and airlifted to Charleston, SC for further medical assistance.

At approximately 6 o’clock in the evening, KLAKRING received a call over bridge-to-bridge radio from Coast Guard Station Charleston concerning the possibility of a downed pilot. KLAKRING’s bridge and Combat Information Center watch teams reacted quickly, plotting the location of the downed pilot and ordering the ship to full power. Cruising in excess of 29 knots, KLAKRING arrived on scene in less than an hour after being notified.

Upon reaching the probable location of the downed pilot, Commander Randy Lovell ordered all available personnel topside in order to get as many eyes as possible topside looking for the pilot and any possible debris. Soon thereafter, Seaman Leland Powell spotted an orange and grey object in the water off KLAKRING’s bow. LTJG Shane Brewer, KLAKRING’s Officer of the Deck, adjusted course accordingly and guided the ship towards the object while simultaneously deploying the ship’s RHIB. While maneuvering to close the downed pilot’s raft, KLAKRING vectored in the Coast Guard Rescue helicopter who deployed their SAR Swimmer to assess the pilot’s medical condition. The RHIB, led by KLAKRING’s Executive Officer Lieutenant Commander Ed Gettins, found the pilot alive but badly injured. Upon determining that it was not in the best interest of the injured pilot to hoist him into the helicopter, KLAKRING’s SAR Swimmers (IC1(SW) Jeffrey Clayton, SN Joel Wells and GSM3(SW) Thomas Hobbs) deployed into the water to assist securing the pilot into a stretcher for recovery into the ship’s RHIB. Due to the extent of his injuries it was further determined that the pilot should remain in his survival float and the floating stretcher be placed underneath it prior to being taken onboard the RHIB. Coordination was key during this event as the Coast Guard helicopter was required to land on KLAKRING in order to refuel for the return trip ashore and shutdown its engines on deck in order to load the injured pilot. Once onboard the RHIB, the injured pilot told KLAKRING’s Executive Officer that the Coast Guard Helicopter had over flown his position several times and did not see him, “Once I saw you guys coming over the horizon, I knew I’d be found soon enough.”

With the pilot safely onboard KLAKRING, the ship’s medical team then commenced a medical examination of the injured pilot. HM1(SW) Hector Ortiz determined that the pilot had suffered compound fractures to both legs, a simple fracture of his right arm and was suffering from mild-hyperthermia. KLAKRING’s medical response team expeditiously stabilized his wounds and prepared him for the flight to the Medical University of South Carolina. As of this printing, the injured pilot is in stable condition while recovering from his injuries.

USS KLAKRING is currently conducting exercises off the east coast in support of the IWO JIMA Expeditionary Strike Group and will continue operations with the EISENHOWER Carrier Strike Group through the middle of May. KLAKRING will return to Mayport prior to returning to sea and taking part in Fleet Week 2006 in Manhattan and Staten Island, NY.

Source: http://www.klakring.navy.mil/

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2006, 15:57
by Purplehaze
700 knots is like 805 mph. And ouch.


Sounds like the old GE was working if she was still moving this fast!!!

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2006, 21:21
by cutlassracer
Or the old GE's T-wheel shelled. That can make things real interesting, real quick, especially at that speed.

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2006, 22:28
by parrothead
Sorry for sounding ignorant, but what's a "T-wheel" :? ?

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2006, 22:36
by swanee
Compound fractures... ouch.

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2006, 22:49
by Guysmiley
Turbine wheel?

Unread postPosted: 11 Apr 2006, 00:05
by parrothead
Guysmiley wrote:Turbine wheel?


Thanks :wink: !

I just hope he recovers to fly another day :) .

Unread postPosted: 11 Apr 2006, 06:48
by DogF16
This latest incident sounds a lot like #<a href="/f-16_fighting_falcon_airframe-3187.html">90-0815</a> from 6 July 2001, also from Shaw AFB. In 2001, however, the pilot, Captain Mitch "Toro" Bulmann, unfortunately and tragically, did not survive:

October 5, 2001 (by Lieven Dewitte) - Air Force investigators have determined that gravity-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) led to the July 6 crash of an F-16CJ off the coast of South Carolina.

The pilot, Capt. Mitchell A Bulmann, sustained fatal injuries while ejecting from the aircraft. The aircraft (#90-0815) was assigned to the 77th Fighter Squadron at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., and was on a training mission at the time of the accident. Bulmann's aircraft was the second F-16 in a formation of four F-16s.

According to an Air Combat Command Accident Investigation Report released today, there is clear and convincing evidence that the pilot suffered from G-LOC, resulting in the aircraft being put into unrecoverable flight. Although Bulmann regained consciousness long enough to eject, his aircraft was at a dangerous airspeed and attitude for ejection, resulting in fatal injuries. The aircraft hit the ocean off the coast of Charleston, S.C., and was destroyed.

The accident occurred during a sequence of basic flight maneuvers. Historical experience with G-LOC incidents indicates that pilots suffering from it are incapacitated for an average of 24 seconds. During that time, the victim may be unresponsive to external inputs.

Source: F-16.net

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2006, 23:08
by Ex-Chief
With another Viper down in Arizona, I wouldn't be surprised to see some major downtime. Just so CC's and pilots can go over training and catch their breathe.

Unread postPosted: 14 Apr 2006, 21:16
by elp
Update:

Flight data recorder found in F-16 crash

The flight data recorder, which was recovered Thursday, is on its way to the Air Force Safety Center at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico

Source: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/my ... 343619.htm

Unread postPosted: 01 May 2006, 12:36
by Lieven
Another update:

Efforts to recover F-16 wreckage end

Investigators Wednesday wrapped up efforts to recover wreckage of an F-16 from Shaw Air Force Base that slammed into the Atlantic Ocean east of Charleston.

Divers recovered the ejection seat equipped with a second flight recorder and classified gear aboard the fighter, Shaw spokesman Lt. Bryan Cox said.

Earlier, divers had found the flight data recorder and videotaped the crash scene — information investigators will need to determine what caused the crash, Cox added.

Source: www.thestate.com


The rest of the wreckage apparently will be left behind in a watery grave 84 feet below the ocean surface.

Unread postPosted: 01 May 2006, 14:18
by parrothead
I wonder what you'd need to do to get salvage rights - I can think of a few parts like the stick, throttle, and HUD that might make some money on ebay :wink: !

Unread postPosted: 03 May 2006, 13:45
by Meathook
I was hoping the "shellout" failures had been resolved by now, when I got out in 96, GE and Pratt were both working on another type of metal (so I heard at that time, a buddy of my worked for Pratt, told me about it) to replace the existing T-Wheels.

Sorry to hear that is still an issue, I guess that research never went full circle, shame.

Unread postPosted: 18 May 2006, 12:13
by Arctus
All,
Some have expressed concern over the two hours it took to pick this MP up. The search time might be explained by the probability that the pilot was unable to help himself be more visible. The LPU and raft are blue-black and if he sustained serious flail injuries then he probably wasn't in the raft to begin with. Broken arms and/or hands make it virtually impossible to get signaling devices out of the survival vest(if he was wearing one). With the ACESII system there are two rubberized canvas rucksacks in the kit containing survival items. Typically, the accessory kit aka Hit-and-Run kit contains the signaling devices. It is attached to the kit container dircetly underneath the pilot via a heavy-duty zipper. A pilot in the water would need functioning hands to get to it and open it.

Unread postPosted: 01 Aug 2006, 22:17
by Lieven
Here's an article via Mike Kopack: <a href="news_article1886.html">ACC releases details on Shaw F-16 crash</a>

and a more detailed report via 'Mushmouth': <a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-5869.html">Shaw's F-16 (93-542) crash report released</a>

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2006, 00:31
by TC
D@mn, I came into this one late, but here's my :2c:

parrothead wrote:I wonder what you'd need to do to get salvage rights - I can think of a few parts like the stick, throttle, and HUD that might make some money on ebay


No salvage rights may be obtained. Even wreckage is still considered government property, and they will do whatever they can to attempt a recovery. It may sound silly, but even the smallest pieces of wreckage can bring new clues to light, in order to aid in the mishap investigation.

Someone asked about the life raft. It is an International Orange raft, which also contains blackout panels for combat.

Glad the pilot made it. Only 3 of the 5 who have attempted supersonic ejection have survived. This mishap was eerily similar to Jon Counsell's ejection from an F-15...G-LOC, followed by a Mach 1+ ejection. His injuries were similar to this pilot's injuries, but to a more severe degree.

ACES II: After the pilot, it is the most valuable part of the aircraft.

Unread postPosted: 02 Aug 2006, 00:31
by Lieven
BTW, here's an article via Mike Kopack: <a href="news_article1886.html">ACC releases details on Shaw F-16 crash</a>

and a more detailed report via 'Mushmouth': <a href="f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-5869.html">Shaw's F-16 (93-542) crash report released</a>