Avionics Technicians/Weapons Loaders

So you want to be a Viper driver, mechanic, loader, avionics technician...? Here you will learn that you will need education, hard work and steadfast dedication.
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Loader

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Unread post10 Nov 2005, 16:01

Agree with you eggroll. One of the best parts of weapons was being able to work many different airframes.

I'm not going to argue smarts or ASVAB, to each their own. Training does play a large part in what you do. You can say loaders only load, well I could say avionics only swaps boxes, however we both know different. I still disagree that any one avionics displine works 85% - 90% of the jet.

Remember, it takes all AFSCs to keep the jets flying!
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Eggroll135R

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Unread post11 Nov 2005, 11:18

Loader wrote:I'm not going to argue smarts or ASVAB, to each their own. Training does play a large part in what you do. You can say loaders only load, well I could say avionics only swaps boxes, however we both know different. I still disagree that any one avionics displine works 85% - 90% of the jet.

Remember, it takes all AFSCs to keep the jets flying!


I've dressed down a few of my troops for making fun of AFSC's that have lower ASVAB scores than E/E. It's not right and goes against everything we are taught in the military about teamwork. I also dislike the term "noner". I haven't heard that term until I got to Kunsan. It takes all of us to put jets in the air. You'd be pretty pissed if you didn't get breakfast in the morning or a paycheck on the 15th.
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Eggroll135R

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Unread post11 Nov 2005, 11:19

Loader wrote:I'm not going to argue smarts or ASVAB, to each their own. Training does play a large part in what you do. You can say loaders only load, well I could say avionics only swaps boxes, however we both know different. I still disagree that any one avionics displine works 85% - 90% of the jet.

Remember, it takes all AFSCs to keep the jets flying!


I've dressed down a few of my troops for making fun of AFSC's that have lower ASVAB scores than E/E. It's not right and goes against everything we are taught in the military about teamwork. I also dislike the term "noner". I haven't heard that term until I got to Kunsan. It takes all of us to put jets in the air. You'd be pretty pissed if you didn't get breakfast in the morning or a paycheck on the 15th.
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Toad462

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Unread post08 Jan 2006, 17:08

To all the loaders that responded appropriately; kudos. I almost x-trained after 5 years in the field and am SO glad I didn't. Being a loader has been an absolute blast and the friendships are top-notch.

PS Operator: I've seen some Specs that couldn't troubleshoot there way out of a sack, and loaders that would've made great Specs, so it's all relative, I guess. I was also an instructor and had students with lousy ASVABS. Come to find out, most kids these days take the ASVAB just to get out of high school science class for a day and don't really care. I ignored all scores when I got a new set of students because it just wasn't a fair representation. I had a 99 scorer do horrible and got washed!
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WilliamG

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Unread post08 Jan 2006, 17:26

stutler wrote:For some reason they dont teach SPECS how to open up there own panels. Always seems like crew dogs and weapons have to do that for them.

Hey Stuttler
Wanna come over and help replace these parts, FLCC, ECA, Avionics MUXBUS or the FQCU and heck even the Radome and do an Assym Brake Rigging?
I don't remember very many CC's that were out there helping us to remove any flap seals or the panels.
But I have to say that If you only remember Specs as sitting around working on computers you did not work with us at MacDill very long... I lost count of how many jets I helped scrub, engines I helped swap as well as just the basics from Tire Change to heck even just getting the birds ready for a flight.

Go as Avionics and you can go anywhere, Go as a Loader you go anywhere,
If no slots are open for CC, wait if you want or just go in and Cross train if you like.



William G
B-Shop 85 -92
Misawa 13th
Mac Dill 72nd 61st
Kunsan 35th
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Ramski

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Unread post18 Jun 2006, 07:41

I've been a loader for almost 19 years now. Worked B-52G, F-4G and F-16s. The flight line is my home. That's all I've ever done except work load barn a few times. I liked the maintenance aspect of my job just as much as loading bombs and missiles. Avionics and electricians were always cool to work with when I needed help with re-wiring harnesses. I sucked at wire diagrams since I was more mechanically minded, but I still love troubleshooting. Installing/Removing gun systems were my favorite and I got pretty good at it while stationed at Luke.

Bottom line, as most of us have explained, it's all what you make of it. If nothing is going on with your work, go watch and learn another person's job. I always would go out and watch them put engines in/out. It'll help if you ever want to work in Production! :wink:
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MechFromHell

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Unread post18 Jun 2006, 08:21

If I only had those two choices...I's have to go avionics as well. And just to bring some reality back to the thread...If you're not a crewchief, you're working for one.
Crew Chief
Mountain Home AFB 2000-2005~91-0370
Sheppard AFB 2005-2009~F-16 Instr
Kadena AB 2009-2015
Holloman AFB 2015-Now
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falconloader

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Unread post18 Jun 2006, 22:56

Weapons & Avionics are very similar when it comes to the troubleshooting. The only diference is what the wire is connected to. When we first starting muxbusing legacy jets there were many Avionics troops that I had to show how to do it. If your looking at staying in the Air Force for a carreer I would look at Weapons, if your using the Air Force as a stepping stone I would go Avionics. There is going to be alot more opportunity in the civilian aviation industry for a pointy head.
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tokenblkguy1785

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Unread post18 Jun 2006, 23:46

That is true, falcon, although the demanding hours of the job does kind of make it difficult to get stepping stones (such as A&P and FCC licenses and corresponding classes)... I guess it depends on what base you're stationed at and how well your jets fly... I'm sure this has been stepped, stomped, and mashed into the ground, but all of the jobs have their pros and cons...me being an avionics troop, I think its awesome to be right there on the flightline and around all those jets during gos...on the flipside I sometimes wish I were a non-er when 8 out of 12 jets redball for avionics on "one-go" fridays and those same 8 end up coming down codes 2 & 3, causing another 12 hour night on a friday for swing shift, but thats just how it goes...so badger, what career field have you decided on? Avionics? Weapons? Services? :lmao:
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buchanangs

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Unread post28 Jun 2006, 05:11

What is your name tokenblkguy1785?
Buch
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F-18FIXER

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Unread post08 Nov 2006, 04:12

I am currently an avionics technician on the F-16 Viper. Of course I am biased, but I think you would get to see more systems, and troubleshoot more being in avionics; Nothing against the loaders, we all have a job to do and it is a team effort. The weapons troops have to troubleshoot their own systems, but in avionics we have a lot more. Its all good if your going into aircraft maintenance!! I spent 17 years working on F-18 hornet avionics, and now I am on the Viper....Its almost there!! Load if you want, but I didn't. Whatever you choose, good luck and welcome to the family!
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techguy2

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Unread post10 Jun 2008, 07:56

8)

Back in 1980 we had a saying on the flight line Nellis, AFB - "Without 462's aka Weapons Loaders the Air Force would be just another airline" , I suspect that is still very true today!

Now I work for Lockheed Martin Sr. Computer Analyst after spending many years in AMC transporting troops around the globe as ATA
FA, you make the best of your life.

Spent a lot of free time learning how to program computers, and getting cert's and degrees.

Choose your profession wisely and switch often!

Call sign "Reach-1" L-1011 Heavy turn right welcome to UAE.

Jack of all Trades, Master of none!

Sincerely,

Former Weapons Loader
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a4624ever

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Unread post19 Dec 2012, 03:20

deesnutz wrote:SPECS RULE!! Whether you are Avionics, E&E or Engines, we control the jet. I'm avionics myself and I can safely say that we as SPECS work over 85% of the aircraft. Weapons is a mindless activity which requires you to load bombs. Its about job satisfaction. I fix things practically every system on the aircraft, including the weapons delivery system, weapons loads bombs. Always remember that SPECS RULE.


Deesnutz - you ever heard the phrase "Without weapons it's just another airline"? Weapons loading is far from a mindless activity. We load weapons, maintain the weapons systems to include electrical systems, bomb racks, guns, etc. Your statements only highlight how little you understand how all the folks that work on the jet fit together. And to say you fix practically every system on the jet is just plain wrong. Your field focuses on locating which LRU isn't working, and swapping it out so back shop can fix it. And don't get me started on how often this "mindless loader" had to straighten out a confused avionics troop.
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a4624ever

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Unread post19 Dec 2012, 03:25

MechFromHell wrote:If I only had those two choices...I's have to go avionics as well. And just to bring some reality back to the thread...If you're not a crewchief, you're working for one.


You aren't serious with that last line, are you? Try telling a loader, hydraulics troop, engine troop, or avionics troop that they work for you. In my day the response would have been very short, straight to the point, and included an expletive or two...and I bet that hasn't changed.
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a4624ever

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Unread post19 Dec 2012, 03:31

16spec wrote:2A332 Avionics technicans DO NOT work inside an office or shop. As deesnuts has said, you will be in charge of maintaining over 85% of all the systems on the aircraft. You would be working inside the cockpit on a daily basis, troubleshooting problems with the communications, navigation, radar, flight controls, ECM, weapons delivery systems (targeting pods, lasers, all that stuff)... you will learn to work just about everything, from nose to tail on the F-16. A weapons loader is just that, a weapons loader. They carry the bombs/missles over to the wing, and bolt them on the pylon. If you would like more information about either of these jobs then check out this site.. they have lots of good info on the air force and military life in general.

2A332 F-16 Avionics Technician
2W1X1 Aircraft Armament Systems


Did you actually manage to keep a straight face when you typed "85% of all the systems on the aircraft"? Your wires may be connected to that many systems, but you definitely do not maintain those systems.
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