Cat-III Limits, and how they are enforced.

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bigredben

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Unread post11 Jan 2020, 03:42

Hi All.

I'm wondering about how the Cat-III roll rate limitation is enforced. So how it "feels" to the pilot.

My understanding is that the Cat-III roll rate limit is roughly 40% less then the normal Cat-I roll rate.

How is this done? Is it a linear decrease in response? So a 40% reduction in roll rate across the board? So the jet feels noticeably more sluggish in roll as soon as you switch it into Cat-III, even when just using light stick forces for general flying.

Or is the initial stick response similar when using light pressure and the limit actually only comes in as you start to demand more roll rate?

I would expect the latter as then there wouldn't be a big difference between the way the aircraft feels for the vast majority of flying, but alas I haven't flown an F-16 so I thought I'd ask around here!

Thanks for any help.

Cheers
Ben
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35_aoa

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Unread post12 Jan 2020, 01:25

Not sure about F-16C/D and beyond, but in the A/B it was a little switch near your left knee on the lower left console. My guess is that the newer jets may have gotten "smarter", but that's what it was for us. Never was in the occasion to use cat III setting, so I can't speak to any of your other questions.
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tjodalv43

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Unread post14 Jan 2020, 00:37

I think he’s talking more about how the FLCS is actually programmed. It’s still a manual switch for CAT I vs III in the cockpit. As
Far as how it feels to the operator, it’s generally more sluggish but that could also be because usually you’re in CAT III because you’re hanging heavy stuff off the wings so I can’t say how much of it is the FLCS and how much is just inertia. But there’s some smart people around that can probably tell you how the FLCS actually applies it! I can say though between CAT I/III/Takeoff and landing gains it’s a very smooth and imperceptible transition. The engineers designed it very well.
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35_aoa

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Unread post14 Jan 2020, 02:47

Actually now that I think about it, I believe when we carried the ACaP pod, it went to cat-3, though my memory is poor. If that were actually true, I don't recall ever noticing anything unusual about the way it flew, though typically on those flights you weren't really flying the thing near the edge of the operating limits like you might in a slick jet doing BFM or something.
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saberrider

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Unread post28 Apr 2020, 19:40

Just remember that the aircraft due to the pylons and hanging bombs is limited to the max 6 G's symmetrical so no rolling and pulling ( to not overload the bolts) has more inertia to change the position's and this alone will definitely down grade the gains.Gums talking about the early F16 aircraft's put in CAT 1 will not be able to give all if the aircraft is loaded with A-G payloads. So I believe this is your second choice .

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