Hey, Siri, how do you fly an F-35?

Discuss the F-35 Lightning II
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spazsinbad

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Unread post12 Jan 2018, 08:37

Thanks for the explanations 'Dragon029'. I'll be patient. One day I'll be flying a virtual F-35C perhaps?
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post13 Jan 2018, 03:14

USAF goes virtual as a test:
Air Force Examines How Virtual Reality Can Help Train Airmen
12 Jan 2018 Steve Hirsch​

"​The Air Force recently conducted a study to determine whether the virtual reality environment would help adults learn at or above current rates and how the brain works and reacts in conjunction with other parts of the body during the learning process.

The study was conducted Jan. 9-12 at Columbus AFB, Miss., by student researchers from Air Command and Staff College, Air University at Maxwell AFB, Ala. In the study, subjects were to fly a T-6 Texan II simulator. The subjects included experienced pilots, pilots with limited experience, and a group with no flying experience, but none of them had past experience with the T-6.

“The data we are gathering can hopefully help us start to determine the key factors of what makes individuals succeed or perform better,” said Maj. Matt Elmore, an Air Command and Staff College student. “Now this won’t be an end-all be-all, but it’s good to be on the leading edge of this and start the conversation.”...

...“Our proposed submission is to develop and implement augmented reality for initial use in the training environment,” said Travis Laughlin, program developer with the 367th Training Support Squadron at Hill AFB, Utah. “By developing software intended to work with smart glasses for example, augmented reality has the ability to teach through visual and hands-on learning methods by providing an interactive overlay that identifies key assets and displays technical data information to the user.”"

Photo: "​Second Lt. Kenneth Soyars, 14th Student Squadron student pilot, takes off during a virtual reality flight simulation Jan. 10, 2018, at Columbus AFB, Miss. Two subjects flew at a time but no other subjects were allowed to watch or learn from other individuals’ sorties. The Adaptive Flight Training Study pushed subjects to learn through the VR technology. Air Force photo by A1C Keith Holcomb." http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pub ... eality.jpg


Source: http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pag ... irmen.aspx
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post13 Jan 2018, 17:50

Dragon029 wrote:The latest version of Prepar3D do feature improvements to optimisation / performance, but I haven't tried them yet and haven't spoken to anyone who has.


I've used 3.4 IIRC, and it's not bad. 4.x should be much better.



I should think a basic desktop simulator should be more than sufficient for learning procedures. For flight simulators there's a cutoff point where you really don't gain much more 'realism' until you really increase the fidelity level (and $$$).

Flying with the VR headsets is interesting. It works pretty well with just looking around and using a HOTAS, but the hard problem is switches and other stuff like that, but interacting with physical devices in the real world or virtual elements in the simulation is challenging, and there's no real good solution for that.

I'd say the best solution for now would be to start with a desktop sim (and since the F-35 largely uses the touchscreen it shouldn't be too hard to have a replica on consumer hardware plus some display(s) for the external visualization) and then move to a dome sim if higher fidelity is required.
"You could do that, but it would be wrong."
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Unread post17 Jan 2018, 16:53

Virtual skies: Air Force hopes ‘fun’ tech transforms pilot learning [LOTS of DETAIL best READ at SOURCE]
17 Jan 2018 Stephen Losey

"The future of pilot training could be found in a pair of virtual reality goggles. When 15 officers and five enlisted airmen convene next month in Austin, Texas, for the Air Force’s new Pilot Training Next program, they could help create a cutting-edge method of teaching airmen to fly ― one that uses advanced biometrics, artificial intelligence, and virtual reality systems such as the Oculus Rift.

“We want to know, in the pilot training context, what this technology can do for us,” Lt. Col. Robert Vicars, director of the six-month program, said in a Jan. 9 interview. “What you get when you use VR is … a more immersive simulation experience than your legacy simulators. With how fast VR is advancing, it’s cheap and it’s pretty ubiquitous.”

Each student will get his or her own $500 to $600 VR helmet, as well as a stick, throttle and rudder pedals to create the cockpit environment, Vicars said. Each student also might get a second helmet to practice at home so they don’t have to carry their equipment around, he said, but it hasn’t been decided yet. Other VR headsets that will being tested are the HTC Vive and the Varjo headset....

...VR simulators might sacrifice some realism, he said. They’ll use digital renderings, and although they will have sticks and pedals, there won’t actually be switches to flip. But they could prove to be a more engaging and effective trainer ― and less tiring ― simply because they’ll be more fun.

“People sit down in front of [video] games for hours and hours,” Vicars said. “It creates a sense of enjoyment. There’s just something fun about it that you don’t get in the legacy sims. There’s this internal energy you get from experiencing it that way.”

One of the key things Vicars hopes the test will show is whether VR’s immersive experience will lead to students performing better when they actually enter a cockpit. For example, will a student who’s wrestled his way out of a dangerous dive simulation in virtual reality learn more about how his body registers fear and alarm in that situation, and as a result, react more coolly if he has a similar emergency in a real plane?

Vicars acknowledges that this test might not work, but even if it doesn’t, he hopes it will lay the groundwork for eventually making such technology ubiquitous in pilot training....

...The program will include a mixture of VR simulations and actual flights in the T-6 trainer, Vicars said, and part of the study will be to determine what the most effective balance is between the two. Vicars said previous studies on legacy pilot simulations showed that students need to spend about 1/3 of their time in the plane, but VR could be different.

If the immersive VR environment works, students might not need to fly as much, he said. But some aspects of pilot training must be done in an actual plane, he said, so the study needs to figure out what those are.

This technology could, for example, replace the so-called “chair flying” training procedures that pilots like Vicars used to do when they were students. When “chair flying,” students sit and look at a piece of paper mocked up with cockpit controls, and repeatedly go through their ground operations procedures, touching the “switches” they need to flip, in the right order, over and over to build muscle memory.

But in a VR environment, a student could use the VR headset to move his head around and look at the switches and run through that checklist. Sensors mounted on the helmet will monitor where students’ hands move and register when they flip switches. Vicars said gloves would likely be too cumbersome when trying to control the stick and throttle...."

Graphic: "In 2015, Reel FX VR, in partnership with GSD&M, created the Oculus Rift flight simulator for the Air Force Recruiting Service. Now, the Air Force is looking at VR for pilot training. (Reel FX VR/GSD&M/Air Force)" https://www.armytimes.com/resizer/ALv7r ... uality(100)/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-mco.s3.amazonaws.com/public/TGGFEEL7RJFUFMQON5QQWOS7W4.jpg


Source: https://www.defensenews.com/news/your-a ... -learning/
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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