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spazsinbad

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Unread post09 May 2015, 10:29

Thanks for the invite '35_aoa' however it is not likely that I would make any TAILHOOK or A-4 Association gathering - but one never knows the future. One of our very esteemed old and bolds made the trek some decade or more ago. Now he had some experience: a nugget in Korea in Sea Furies from HMAS Sydney, then eventually CO of 805 Squadron with Sea Venoms from HMAS Melbourne and then he became the first CO of VF-805 to go to sea in 1969 with the new A4Gs - cut short by the sad collision with USS Frank E. Evans however (not fault of MELBOURNE - on a flying course - at night).

My time in the RAN and in the RAN FAA was relatively short being only a total of 9.5 years, joining the RAN when I had just turned 17 (my mum had to sign the papers) beginning 1966. Been out and about since then but not in any aviation format.

https://www.youtube.com/user/SpazSinbad ... =0&sort=dd

Here is a great (but poor fillum quality) clip about the TA-4J experience: Then some T-2C to F-35C....



A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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35_aoa

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Unread post09 May 2015, 10:37

hah nice video......not only was I a Meridian guy, but I was also a VT-7 guy, and while my memory is fuzzy now, I am pretty sure my CQ callsign was also S7 ("Sierra seven" in the video). Small world, albeit mine being a number of years later.
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Unread post09 May 2015, 10:45

WOT NO 'SH Sevan?' We could select our tactical callsigns in the FAA so there were some good 'uns. My moniker here is a compilation of my favs (held by others - 'Spastic' and 'Sinbad'). However our general 'nicknames' were selected by others. Mostly I can remember my fellows by their nickname whilst their proper names just escape me. :doh:

Otherwise our SIDE NUMBER was used for ATC in the A4G in the range of 870 to 889. So 'triple 8' was a beauty indeed. :drool:
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Unread post09 May 2015, 11:03

spazsinbad wrote:WOT NO 'SH Sevan?' We could select our tactical callsigns in the FAA so there were some good 'uns. My moniker here is a compilation of my favs (held by others - 'Spastic' and 'Sinbad'). However our general 'nicknames' were selected by others. Mostly I can remember my fellows by their nickname whilst their proper names just escape me. :doh:

Otherwise our SIDE NUMBER was used for ATC in the A4G in the range of 870 to 889. So 'triple 8' was a beauty indeed. :drool:


We had/have personal call signs......normally the ones from flight training and the FRS did not stick.....mine certainly didn't. But for that particular phase of flight training, we had defined ATC callsigns, I guess for ease of knowing who was who. VT-7 used "Sierra" prefix, VT-9 (our sister squadron in meridian) used "Tango" if I recall correctly.....and then your personal number, ie who was who in the zoo of a bunch of students all doing FCLP's and CQ. Beyond that small part of life, every squadron I've even been in had a standard ATC call sign, with the number part just being generally your event number.......in the RAG it would have been, as an example, SHUTR12, meaning VMFAT-101, first event, dash 2. So on and so forth for all the squadrons I've flown with since, obviously different standard ATC call signs. And you guys did personal callsigns like we do........you do not choose, you are given. We only do the side number thing at the boat, with agencies attached to the CSG. Otherwise, you use your ATO defined call sign, literally taken right off the sheet of paper......ie when talking to international controllers or tactical entities.
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Unread post09 May 2015, 11:35

I think you may have the wrong impression - I have had this conversation a few times now on this forum about our 'callsigns'. 'Nickname' is a funny name usually - but not always - referring to a characteristic of the holder. This 'nickname' was not used in the air - ever. Nicknames came about by general consensus use by the plebs in the mess (wardroom) and one could have a few nicknames indeed and often they were funny in the extreme if not libellous.

However our tactical callsign used for formation leading or armament sorties was self selected, mostly they were very ordinary. For example I selected from past knowledge that 'Sinbad' was available. However the original SINBAD returned to NAS Nowra (the old and bold I spoke about earlier) so I had to think of anotherie - LUCIFER was it (Think 'Sympathy for the Devil' by the strolling bones). Immediately the smart farts shortened it to 'LUCY' and that was that - I was LUCY (in the sky with diamonds).

The RAN FAA was then and even more so today - A VERY SMALL WORLD. Not more than 100 pilots were trained via the OFS Operational Flying School in VC-724 Squadron over the 16 year life of the A4G (not all those years embarked). Probably about another 50 were trained to basic standard for various reasons (S2E pilots before going to LSO School in USofA where there were no S2s to fly at that time) or other various odds and sods. People know me even if we have never met - the RAN FAA is THAT small. :mrgreen:

The tradition of self selecting tactical callsigns came from the RN FAA from whence our RAN FAA grew after WWII and also with an influx of old and bolds from the RAAF from WWII. We are quite a mutt mixture with a vocab to boot. :mrgreen:
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Unread post09 May 2015, 13:39

spazsinbad wrote:In a safe environment our TA4G instructors demonstrated the 'down elevator' alarmingly well - I was convinced - and (probably my memory is faulty :mrgreen: ) but I never got SLOW or underpowered (OK one time). I happened to go on a 'jungle survival' course run by our ARMY for new aircrew out of basic/advanced training up in QLD Canungra with a boggie RAAF Sabre Jock who had done what you described above. He ejected just in time and of course was bollocked mercilessly. The SABRE would not have had the excellent engine acceleration available in the A-4 for example - I'll guess a T-38 spools up OK? Our first jet experience was in a dual Vampire (in the RAAF) which had only the golden arm of the pilot to control engine acceleration/RPM - and there were zones of RPM at the high end which one could only transit and NEVER DWELL - otherwise engine failure toot sweet. Engine RUB? Cor Blimey Guv. :mrgreen: It Ain't Half Hot Mum.


The T-38 had excellent throttle response. What was killing guys in the final turn accidents was the failure to perceive the progressive stall of the jet. You have burble at the wingtips as you're flying the thing around the final turn, from being at pattern altitude at the 180 point, to being "halfway down, halfway around" at the 90 point, to shooting for a final rollout at 300 ft, 1 mile from the runway. Overshooting, guys were trying to pull the nose around and inducing an insidious sink rate that wasn't noticed until ground rush came up to meet you; rather than appropriately rolling out and climbing, and accepting the overshoot. Was one of the most difficult things to master in that jet for students, and was very unforgiving.

Anyway engine acceleration was done via the noise made when the engine just started to overfuel - that was the best rate. Otherwise overfuel and the engine might stop altogether, but more likely just almost stall, and take a very long time to accel if no action taken otherwise (reduce throttle and try again). Not a recommended thing to do if low slow on short finals in a notable downdraught situation. Luckily the Vamp had more or less a straight wing with a slight sweep whilst the Sea Venom had a more pronounced sweep (not delta by any means though) and a good engine accel governor - a must for carrier aviation.


One jet with very slow engine acceleration was the T-37 Tweet, however to combat that it utilized what were known as thrust attenuators, or small thrust diversion panels that deployed sidewards from the panel just aft of the exhaust nozzle. Made for having to carry extra thrust on final, and thus lessen spool up time for a go around.
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Unread post09 May 2015, 15:13

Salute!

The Deuce was notorious for the high sink rate within a few seconds problem. Seems that was a problem for most delta's.

One jet with very slow engine acceleration was the T-37 Tweet, however to combat that it utilized what were known as thrust attenuators, or small thrust diversion panels that deployed sidewards from the panel just aft of the exhaust nozzle. Made for having to carry extra thrust on final, and thus lessen spool up time for a go around.


Yeah, but we solved that in the A-37. With neat J-85's, suckers wrapped up like a recip motor. Attenuators were used and were bigger. They were to keep you slow!! On ground and in the air. Can you imagine going from 2,000 pounds of thrust total in the 'T", to 2850 per motor?

Sluf was slow accelerating, but all-time champ had to be the T-33..A Viper in BUC was almost identical, so we old farts showed the newbies how to start and advance the throtttle when using BUC. This was after a few motor problems and bailouts trying to use the BUC.

Gums sends...
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Unread post09 May 2015, 17:47

Gums wrote:Salute!

Yeah, but we solved that in the A-37. With neat J-85's, suckers wrapped up like a recip motor. Attenuators were used and were bigger. They were to keep you slow!! On ground and in the air. Can you imagine going from 2,000 pounds of thrust total in the 'T", to 2850 per motor?

Sluf was slow accelerating, but all-time champ had to be the T-33..A Viper in BUC was almost identical, so we old farts showed the newbies how to start and advance the throtttle when using BUC. This was after a few motor problems and bailouts trying to use the BUC.

Gums sends...

The L-39 can be a challenge if the engine is spooled down for landing. The F414 engines in the SuperBug are a dream in comparison. The older F404 engines had their moments and sometimes rolled back to idle at inopportune times, but rarely both engines together would roll back.

Have you been offered a ride in a civilian A-37? There are a few around, and still flying.
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Unread post09 May 2015, 19:08

Salute!

RE: a hop in an A-37

A troop about 40 miles south of my son has restored a Vee Bee A-37 and it will soon be at a place in southern Utah - St George. There could be a chance to fly this summer down in south Florida when I visit my son. I want to get him and his kids down there to sit in the thing. May have to get a physical, but chances of flying are slim.

I visited about 2 years ago and we took a few pics. I am the skinny, but handsome 70 year-old dude.

http://s120.photobucket.com/user/gatlin ... estoration

My wife took many pics, but at least these came thru.

Honest to God, the A-37 cost a fraction of what the Warthog did and actually had better avionics. And then the A-7D came along and it was "Star Wars" or "Star Trek".

Gums sends...
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"God in your guts, good men at your back, wings that stay on - and Tally Ho!"
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Unread post09 May 2015, 19:14

:twisted: Nice leg up there GUMS! :mrgreen: Will be nice to have your 'figure' at your great age. :doh: The looks? NAH. :devil: Grow a beard why doncha - that's what I do - all white all round. :drool:

The tweety bird looks to be a similar size to the old wooden fuselage Vamp (with straight metal wings). I guess the tweet wings are relatively straight on the front side?
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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Unread post09 May 2015, 20:31

Gums wrote:Salute!

RE: a hop in an A-37

A troop about 40 miles south of my son has restored a Vee Bee A-37 and it will soon be at a place in southern Utah - St George. There could be a chance to fly this summer down in south Florida when I visit my son. I want to get him and his kids down there to sit in the thing. May have to get a physical, but chances of flying are slim.

I visited about 2 years ago and we took a few pics. I am the skinny, but handsome 70 year-old dude.

http://s120.photobucket.com/user/gatlin ... estoration

My wife took many pics, but at least these came thru.

Honest to God, the A-37 cost a fraction of what the Warthog did and actually had better avionics. And then the A-7D came along and it was "Star Wars" or "Star Trek".

Gums sends...

Ahh the medical. A sore neck keeps me out of the air at the moment.

I might be preaching to the choir, but the A-37B performance wise is one of the finest CAS jets ever made. I'm pretty sure at least one MiG hit the deck trying to chase it. One SuperBug almost hit the deck after loosing too much energy banking down low trying to chase the A-37 and get on their six.

The one thing that has changed is the cosmic avionics has gotten smaller, so upgrading avionics could make one of these jets into something that would pack quite a punch for $2k an hour not $20k/hr. Mere mortals can afford to fly the A-37 on the weekend.
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Unread post09 May 2015, 22:37

a-37-specs.jpg


Salute!

We have upgraded our "spec sheet" for the second printing of our book.

So see attached pic. All use is under a copyright and such.

The neat thing was height above the rwy when in the seat. Basically think you were coming down and then running along the rwy until touchdown.

We earned our spurs in the 1968 Tet. I flew over 60 sorties in February, the shortest month of the year. Best mission was up to Hue Citadel and another A-37 flight outta Pleiku also made it in. No one else. We heard the abort calls and such from the Huns and others. So dropped on the wall at east side and helped some USMC folks. Ceiling was like 1500 feet and we had nape and slicks, so it was dicey. We had to jett our linear CBU pods in the river south of the citadel.

We were faster and smaller than the A-1, but had about the same turn radius. So we had the lowest loss rate of any attack plane in the whole stoopid war.

Gums sends....
Gums
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"God in your guts, good men at your back, wings that stay on - and Tally Ho!"
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Unread post09 May 2015, 23:46

Gums, several years ago I was asked if I was interested in helping a new small company to develop an airplane for COIN. I think they were going to try to sell it to Iraq. Not for me, so I begged off and recommended someone else. The airplane? A completely redesigned, all-composite A-37, with modern systems. Never heard any more of it, so I guess it died. Interesting concept.
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Unread post10 May 2015, 00:12

Gums wrote:
a-37-specs.jpg


Salute!

We have upgraded our "spec sheet" for the second printing of our book.

So see attached pic. All use is under a copyright and such.

The neat thing was height above the rwy when in the seat. Basically think you were coming down and then running along the rwy until touchdown.

We earned our spurs in the 1968 Tet. I flew over 60 sorties in February, the shortest month of the year. Best mission was up to Hue Citadel and another A-37 flight outta Pleiku also made it in. No one else. We heard the abort calls and such from the Huns and others. So dropped on the wall at east side and helped some USMC folks. Ceiling was like 1500 feet and we had nape and slicks, so it was dicey. We had to jett our linear CBU pods in the river south of the citadel.

We were faster and smaller than the A-1, but had about the same turn radius. So we had the lowest loss rate of any attack plane in the whole stoopid war.

Gums sends....


Definitely a great jet. Used to see them all the time at DM with the 23rd TASS, up until the late '80s. As well as with the AFRES out of Grissom back in the day.

Operationally, the ROKAF still had OA-37s and O-2s out of Seoul AB and Wonju AB back when I was in Hogs in Korea, they'd come visit every now and again, or I'd see them working some of the air-ground ranges when I was out there. Osan used to have a TASS also that the Hog squadron incorporated when that unit closed and the Hogs moved over from Suwon.
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Unread post10 May 2015, 00:18

Salute!

Actually, Cessna's new boss is marketing the "Scorpion".

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textron_AirLand_Scorpion

COIN and not a Warthog replacement.

Interesting, as Cessna tried to sell a similar airframe back about 1970 - 1971. Turbofan motors and tandem cockpit, plus a centerline gun and even thrust reversers versus the attenuators.

To be honest, I would take the A-37B to the 'stan with new avionics and other mods. Figure 4 or 5 million $$$ per copy and brand new. No stealth, minimal composites and maybe some new motors right off the shelf.

Gums sends...
Gums
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"God in your guts, good men at your back, wings that stay on - and Tally Ho!"
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