CNO Adm. Greenert Emphasizes Navy's Bright Future

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Unread post17 Jan 2014, 05:08

SNA 2014: Navy Eyes Osprey Flights for AFSB Fleet 16 Jan 2014 Carlo Muñoz
"Navy leaders are in the midst of a series of studies to see whether the MV-22 can be flown off the sea service’s expected fleet of Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB) ships....

...On Thursday, Stevens dismissed plans to integrate the JSF onto the AFSB noting that program leaders were fully focused on getting the MH-53E, and possibly the MV-22, qualified aboard the forward staging base ships."

http://news.usni.org/2014/01/16/sna-201 ... afsb-fleet
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Unread post09 May 2014, 17:50

One dismisses the plan (see above "...Stevens dismissed plans to integrate the JSF onto the AFSB... ) this chap does not apparently.... LONG article best read at source.
Introducing America’s New ‘Expeditionary Fleet’ 09 May 2014 Robert D. Holzer

"...the Expeditionary Fleet. These are ships fully capable of operating in that petri dish mix of missions that constitute the vast majority of what Navy and Marine forces do on a daily basis. This includes missions such as presence and stability operations, humanitarian assistance/disaster response, security assistance and maritime training, counter-piracy, countering transnational crime and search and rescue operations. The Expeditionary Fleet can shoulder the majority of missions that fall into what the military categorizes as Phase 0 (shaping the environment) to Phase 2+ (when combat actually begins). This is not a small set of missions.

Senior Navy and Marine Corps leaders have been strong and vocal advocates for the capabilities these Expeditionary Ships bring and how important they are to future operations. They have repeatedly talked about these ships in public forums and advocated their acquisition before Congress....

...The term expeditionary, on the other hand, conveys a firm operational purpose and is more readily understood by those who read it. It connotes being deployed overseas and rapidly conducting operations––ready where and when needed. Both the Navy and Marines have long-cited their expeditionary roots and even the Army is touting its intent to become more expeditionary. Moreover, the term expeditionary is amply cited in the Pentagon’s current collection of strategic documents, which places the term Expeditionary Fleet firmly in the center of today’s strategic dialogue across the joint force. For example, the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) emphasizes that boosting the numbers of forward-deployed naval forces to critical regions is key to both increasing presence and reducing the time required to respond should a crisis erupt. Moreover, the QDR talks about deploying “new combinations of ships, aviation assets and crisis response forces” to provide more options for regional commanders. This new emphasis encapsulates the exact types of innovative capabilities possessed by the Expeditionary Ships fleet.

This innovative impulse to fully explore and exploit the new types of capabilities resident in these ships is also embedded in the Marine Corps Expeditionary Force 21 concept. This 10-year vision, approved by Gen. James Amos, Marine Corps Commandant, details how the Corps will operate in the future and is intended to guide experimentation, force development and inform program decisions. Key to this concept is a focus on the ships and their capabilities that help enable the Marines to deploy overseas and get ashore if required.

Amphibious warships provide the full range of capabilities necessary to meet the critical needs of America’s combatant commanders....

...Recognizing this looming gap in amphibious ships, the EF 21 concept places a premium on experimenting with new platforms and adapting traditional employment patterns to help “stretch” the amphibious force while still providing a robust level of overseas presence to meet regional operational needs. JHSVs, Mobile Landing Platforms, LCS and other high-speed transports and various Maritime Prepositioning Force ships are all specifically listed within the EF 21 concept as candidates for “exploration and experimentation.” It should be emphasized that EF 21 clearly states that building more amphibious warships is the preferred course of action—if sufficient funding was available.

Navy and Marine Corps leaders should be given credit for their willingness to compile a growing list of “explorations and experimentations.” The expansiveness of this list demonstrates a commitment to seriously assess the mission boundaries offered to the sea services by this collection of ships and to fully wring out their operational capabilities. Here are the ongoing or proposed experimentations, demonstrations or potential missions that Navy and Marine Corps officials have already articulated for these ships:

◾Assessing the deployment of small force packets of Marines on LCS, JHSV and MLP

◾Deployed USNS Spearhead (JHSV-1) to the Mediterranean for stability operations missions in North Africa and Gulf of Guinea before transiting to Caribbean to support 4th Fleet operations

◾Use former USS Ponce, (Interim) Afloat Forward Staging Base, as test platform for sea-based laser defense system in summer 2014

◾Deploying Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force—Southern Command aboard USS America to conduct training with Chile and Columbian military’s as ship transits to San Diego for commissioning

◾Use a JHSV as test platform for electromagnetic rail-gun tests in 2016

◾Used T-AKE ship as base for Marine Expeditionary Brigade command element in the Ssang Yong 2014 exercise with South Korean forces

◾Deployed USS Freedom to Singapore two years ahead of schedule to accelerate concept of operations learning

◾Integrated Griffin missiles on Patrol Craft deployed in Arabian Gulf

◾Assessing MLP, AFSB, T-AKE and other ships use as “lily pads” to support MV-22 Osprey and F-35B operations

◾Developing adaptable mission packages for MLPs

◾Deployed Marine Force Recon Platoon on Freedom for training mission

This rather impressive list is just the beginning of what the sea services can do when the Expeditionary Fleet arrives in greater numbers and the Navy and Marine Corps really begin to understand their true operational capabilities and capacities...."

SOURCE: http://breakingdefense.com/2014/05/intr ... ary-fleet/
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Unread post10 Dec 2014, 23:20

Some of youse may remember Poncie Ponce (from the original Hawaiian EYE [Five-0])? This PONCE is serious brudda: [best to read it all at the URL because a lot of text has been chopped here] & nuther story here:

http://www.defenseone.com/technology/20 ... lf/100929/
Star Wars At Sea: Navy’s Laser Gets Real
10 Dec 2014 Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

PENTAGON: The age of laser weapons has officially begun. Since September, the Navy has had a $40 million, 100-kilowatt Laser Weapons System (LaWS) aboard the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf. “They’re using it every single day,” said the Chief of Naval Research, Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder. Sailors — not contractors or engineers — perform basic maintenance, train on the Xbox-style controls, destroy practice targets such as drones, and spy on suspicious ships and aircraft, using the laser’s sophisticated optics as a sort of super-telescope....

...As the Navy video at the top of this article shows, the laser can focus precisely enough to destroy a single rocket-propelled grenade mounted on an (unmanned) small boat — a proxy for the kind of improvised fast attack craft used by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps. But the video also shows the RPG detonating in a cloud of shrapnel that would probably kill the Iranians anyway, even if the laser technically never fired at them.

The Navy has tested using the laser against an incoming swarm of Iranian-style attack boats, Klunder said. They didn’t actually blow up the boats — that gets expensive, he said — but they practiced training the laser on one boat, holding the beam on target for the “one or two seconds” required to burn out some vital component, then moving on the next boat, and the next, and the next, in rapid succession.

How big a target can this laser kill? “We can disable [a] rather large craft or helicopter,” Klunder said. An aircraft, of course, would then crash; a boat would be “dead in the water.”

Faster-moving targets, however, will have to wait for future, higher-powered lasers. By 2016 or 2017, the Navy expects to install a 100 to 150-kilowatt laser aboard a ship, Klunder said. “That will expand the [target set] beyond UAVs and fast-attack craft,” he said. So while “a lot” of current ships could accommodate the current 30-kw LaWS, he said, “the 100-150 [kw] one, that’s the one we’re really targeting for potential more extensive use.”

At that higher power level, it may be possible to achieve what’s been a holy grail for lasers since Ronald Reagan: shooting down incoming missiles. Klunder and Fuller said the Navy was looking at that mission for the 100-150 kw laser, though they didn’t promise they could do it....

...Perhaps the most surprising side benefit, however, is that the same high-quality optics, stabilization, and targeting algorithms required to aim the laser can also serve as a super telescope. So in addition to its primary defensive purpose, said Klunder, “we also now use this on an everyday basis on targeting and identification of potential threats.”

“[If] you see an air contact that’s out on the horizon, your naked eye can see it’s a little dot,” added Fuller. “With binoculars, you can make it out as an airplane; with this….”

“….we can precisely tell what’s its carrying, who it is, what it’s doing,” Klunder broke in.

We can “read the tail number,” Fuller said...."

Source: http://breakingdefense.com/2014/12/star ... gets-real/

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Unread post11 Dec 2014, 01:34

Looks protective develoment like shielding for aircraft and munitions will accelerate. Higher speed and more maneuvrable munitions will likely be important as the faster a weapon can reach the target or if able to avoid lasing thru maneuvers, the less exposure it will have against lasing. Reminds me of old cold war mentality to add armor on missiles to counter CIWS.
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Unread post11 Dec 2014, 02:33

weasel1962 wrote:Looks protective develoment like shielding for aircraft and munitions will accelerate. Higher speed and more maneuvrable munitions will likely be important as the faster a weapon can reach the target or if able to avoid lasing thru maneuvers, the less exposure it will have against lasing. Reminds me of old cold war mentality to add armor on missiles to counter CIWS.

I doubt that is practical. The sensors can't really be armored, and weight is at a premium.
Though you might be able make it more difficult by making the skin more reflective.

Really, though, what you need is stand-off and LO so the laser doesn't know where to shoot in the first place.
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Unread post11 Dec 2014, 03:18

count_to_10 wrote:
weasel1962 wrote:Looks protective develoment like shielding for aircraft and munitions will accelerate. Higher speed and more maneuvrable munitions will likely be important as the faster a weapon can reach the target or if able to avoid lasing thru maneuvers, the less exposure it will have against lasing. Reminds me of old cold war mentality to add armor on missiles to counter CIWS.

I doubt that is practical. The sensors can't really be armored, and weight is at a premium.
Though you might be able make it more difficult by making the skin more reflective.

Really, though, what you need is stand-off and LO so the laser doesn't know where to shoot in the first place.



I wonder if the work done for the Distributed Aperture Semi-Active Laser Seeker (DASALS) technology gives missile designers some guidance on a mitigation path? If faced with a target with laser aided CIWS that can blind/damage your primary seeker, just screw on that pricey but effective distributed seeker stage right behind your primary seeker - that can allow the missile to continue to track with undamaged seekers when one or more is lost or blinded.

LO AND robust seeker array -- even better.

http://www.baesystems.com/product/BAES_ ... ive-dasals

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Unread post16 Dec 2014, 07:22

marksengineer wrote:The impression I get is that the Navy doesn't like the medium strike mission. Waiting for them to cancel the U-Class UCAV as well. Don't think they can cancel the F-35C because of the political furor but believe it they had their way the would. Any conflict in the Pacific will see the carriers play a dominate role but without a medium to long range strike asset they will be more vunerable and take losses.


I think they want the F/A XX to be the long range strike aircraft. And they want the UCLASS for CSG orbits and for these missions...

r. "A decade ago we had P-3s, and the P-3s were flying over land, doing
overland surveillance, more than anything else," Admiral Harry B Harris Jr, commander of the US Pacific
Fleet, told IHS Jane's . "We literally almost flew the wings off the P-3 because of that overland mission ....


I like and respect Congressman Forbes, but I disagree with him about this. I think the Navy probably has the correct plan for the F35, the F/A XX, and the UCLass. Whether it can be achieved due to budget constraints is an open question. But the fallback would be an all F35 fleet (similar to the current all F18 fleet) which wouldn't be the end of the world. I think the Navy badly needs the UCLASS ISR platform (with light strike), and I think it is very risky in the current budget environment to try to make that into a primary strike platform in contested space.
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