F-35B UK SRVL info - Updated when new/old info available

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Unread post27 Jul 2014, 05:45

ACTIVE STICK & THROTTLE FOR F-35
16 Oct 2008 Joseph Krumenacker; NAVAIR Flight Controls / JSF Vehicle Systems

"...• Throttle:
– Variable aft & forward end-stops (e.g. STOVL mode is different from CTOL mode)
– AB gate (when STOVL system is not deployed)
– Launch gate (CV only)
– STOVL center detent (zero commanded acceleration)

– STOVL on-ground power braking force gradient

– Back-drive

• Auto-Throttle Approach (all variants)

• STOVL Decel-to-Hover..."

Source: http://www.csdy.umn.edu/acgsc/mtg102/SubcommitteD/F35 AIS Krumenacker SAE 081016.ppt (13.8Mb)

PDF remake (1Mb): download/file.php?id=19248
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Unread post30 Jul 2014, 20:50

Forgive me (nah don't) if I think this is more good news probably for future SRVLs? :devil:

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=25800&p=276369#p276369
"...unique flight test conditions for SLs and all directional control and anti-skid wet runway testing. All testing was performed with BF-4..."
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Unread post10 Aug 2014, 05:16

THE PERFECT PARTNERSHIP
MAI Magazine Issue 14 BAE Systems

"....“The beauty of this is the carrier has been designed with the aircraft in mind,” explains Pete [Kosogorin - BAE F-35 test pilot].

“It’s not an anti-submarine carrier that has been modified for F-35 – the QE carrier has been designed for F-35 right from the outset, so I think the two will integrate very well.

“That work began many years ago and the stuff we’ve done in the simulator at Warton has been incredibly important because many of the results of those trials fed into the design of the deck – the markings on the deck, the lighting on the deck, the systems. “There are various shipborne systems that will help the pilot when landing, particularly in high sea states when the conditions are challenging and the deck is moving around quite a bit, or at a night when there is limited visibility.

“But the sim work hasn’t just been about developing the flight controls software in the aircraft, it’s also about finding out how to fly and carry out certain manoeuvres, and working out various flying techniques, such as shipborne rolling vertical landing.

“We’ve brought together a cross section of individuals to do that, from very experienced Harrier pilots with legacy experience to US Navy conventional F18 pilots, and also Royal Navy and other Airforce pilots who have no shipborne or STOVL experience. “That has been done to ensure the design is optimised for all levels of ability, and all levels of scale.”...

...“Obviously I work for BAE Systems, but I think the fact that we’ve got a team of 30 or so engineers out here who are intimately involved in this, not just on the STOVL side and the B model but we also have one of the lead engineers on the C model which is the US Navy variant, is a great success story.

“Some of these guys have been working on the design and development side for 10 years plus, and now we are into the flight test stage, they are either working on the flight tests directly or they are engineers who are looking at and analysing the data we produce from those flight tests.

“It may be weeks later before we find out that the point we flew was good, or there was a problem in the point that we need to look at again, or we might need to change the software.

“So it’s not just about expanding the envelope of the aeroplane, it’s also about developing the software to make the aircraft better, and each member of the BAE Systems team is vitally important to that process....

...But what can those test pilots lucky enough to be chosen for those trials expect? And how will the F-35B compare to its predecessor, the Harrier, which was the aircraft of choice for the old Invincible class carriers?

“By the time the F-35 comes into service and has been fully tested, there won’t be many Harrier pilots flying it – it will be a much younger generation,” says Pete. “The aircraft itself, and the control and handling it has in slow speeds in STOVL mode 4, is exceptional.

“I’ve landed at night on a ship in the Harrier and that’s a really exciting – but also scary – event.

“You are probably the most aroused you will ever be as a pilot in terms of focused concentration, but that doesn’t mean you can’t make a mistake.

“When a pilot is working really hard, he’s using up a high proportion of his capacity and his ability to spot things, to see things, and to cope with things is affected. “In the Harrier, you could easily miss one aspect of your technique, miss a problem with the aircraft, or not hear a radio call, so it was easy to lose track of what was going on.

“But this aircraft works so well for you, the extra capacity that allows you is a big bonus. It means a pilot can deal with an emergency better, or follow a particular technique better, so the execution of your approach and landing on a ship is going to be way more efficient.”

Source: http://www.baesystems.com/download/BAES ... artnership (PDF 300Kb)
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WartonSimF-35Bcvf.jpg
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Unread post19 Aug 2014, 05:02

MISSED putting the SLOW LANDING bits in the quote from: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=25800&p=276369#p276369 above
F-35B successfully completes wet runway and crosswind testing
01 Aug 2014 Manufacturing Group

"The testing, completed in 37 missions, achieved 114 test points, including 48 of 48 wet runway test points....

...19 of 23 unique flight test conditions for SLs and all directional control and anti-skid wet runway testing..."

Source: http://www.onlineamd.com/f35b-wet-runwa ... _LKbJB-8kJ
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Unread post03 Sep 2014, 15:14

On previous page of this thread I had a question about what Maj. Rusnok was saying about the max/mil throttle positions for STOing (19 Jul 2014 'Jumpin' Jack Flash): viewtopic.php?f=22&t=20304&p=275686&hilit=Rusnok#p275686
FLIGHT TEST: F-35 Simulator - Virtual fighter
31 Jul 2007 Mike Gerzanics

"...Seated in the simulator, my left hand fell to the large throttle, called the "cow pie" due to its size and shape, which moves along a long linear track. The active throttle is back-driven by the autothrottle system and has variable electronic detents for afterburner and STOVL operations. There is no "cut-off" position, a single guarded engine master switch performing that function...."

Source: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... er-215810/
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Unread post10 Sep 2014, 09:54

Stepping-Stones
Tony Osborne AVIATION WEEK & SPACE TECHNOLOGY / SEPTEMBER 8, 2014

"...Test pilots have completed much of the trials work required for the shipboard rolling vertical landing (SRVL), a technique developed for the U.K. to allow the F-35 to land on the ship without having to offload fuel or expensive ordnance beforehand, particularly in warmer regions of the world such as the Middle East.

Trials of creeping vertical landings onto runways at speeds of 10-150 kt. have proven the viability of the SRVL technique, according to BAE Systems test pilot Pete "Wizzer" Wilson. However, the technique now needs to be put to the test on the ship, which is likely to occur on the U.S. East Coast at the end of 2018.

Approach speeds to the ship will probably be 50-60 kt., taking into account the ship's speed and aircraft overtake velocity.

After touchdown, the pilot simply applies the brakes. Once stopped, the fighter can be maneuvered to its parking position, allowing aircraft behind to land in quick succession.

According to Wilson, the U.S. Marine Corps has expressed interest in the SRVL capability, which would enable operation of F-35Bs from a U.S. Navy carrier without an arrestor hook. "One of the reasons Harriers have never been on board is because of that need to do a vertical landing, which slows the pace of carrier operations," says Wilson. "SRVL could be one way of cross-decking with the F-35B." [See SRVL Bedford Array view of CVN - PERHAPS below]

The Royal Navy and Royal Air Force expect to do a 50:50 mix of SRVL and standard vertical landings, but managers close to the program anticipate an increased number of SRVLs because they help to reduce the load on engines and thereby increase engine service life.

Deck landings can be performed at up to sea state 6—with waves 4-6 meters (13-20 ft.) in height with assistance from the Bedford Array developed by U.K.'s Qinetiq. The system uses a series of flashing lights located on the centerline of the ship at the landing point. The pilot's helmet-mounted display has a ship-reference velocity vector; by maneuvering the aircraft with vector lined up on the Bedford Array lights, the pilot can make a 6-deg. glideslope approach and landing...."

http://i98.photobucket.com/albums/l261/ ... st2011.gif

Source: AVIATION WEEK & SPACE TECHNOLOGY / SEPTEMBER 8, 2014
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Unread post19 Nov 2014, 01:24

VX-23 Strike Test News 2010 - 14 INDEX: [same info below with the F-35C info repeated here: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281771&hilit=nawcad#p281771 ]
http://www.navair.navy.mil/nawcad/index ... 4E8876769E
VX-23 Strike Test News 2014 [02 Sep 2014]:

"...SHORT TAKEOFF AND VERTICAL LANDING (STOVL)
The F-35B continued sea trials last summer aboard the USS Wasp (LHD 1). Lessons learned from the previous ship trials in 2011 were incorporated and evaluated. Centerline tracking during short takeoffs (STOs) was drastically improved with the combination of an improved NWS schedule and the use of the Three-Bearing Swivel Nozzle (3BSN) for yaw control. BF-1 and BF-5 were utilized for the sea trials to further expand the wind and performance envelope for F-35B STOVL operations on L-class ships. Mission systems testing, to include the Night Vision Camera (NVC) and Distributed Aperture System (DAS) was accomplished by BF-4.

The F-35B STOVL envelope expansion continued last year. The Rolling Vertical Landing (RVL), Creeping Vertical Landing (CVL), Vertical Landing (VL), Slow Landing (SL), Short Take Off (STO) and Vertical Takeoff (VTO) envelopes were all expanded. RVL testing included main runway testing with some crosswind testing. CVL testing began and was completed on both the main runway and the Expeditionary Airfield (EAF). The VL wind envelope was further expanded, with up to 10 knots of tail wind and 15 knots of crosswind. SL and STO testing included crosswind expansion out to 20 knots, completed primarily at Edwards Air Force Base and NAWS China Lake during a wet runway and crosswind detachment. STOVL formation testing began this year, which included formation STOs and SLs. VTO expansion occurred concurrently with AM2 soft soil pad certification....

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/nawcad/index ... oad&id=820 (PDF 2.8Mb)
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Unread post23 Nov 2014, 05:44

As you have all probably guessed by now - I have a tinea :mrgreen: ear for how the F-35s land. That aspect DOES interest me a lot and because two of the three variants will be landing on flat decks at sea - why bleedin' not? :mrgreen: Go here for the gen and the same info will be posted on the newish thread about the F-35C trials and tribs (NOT) aboard NIMITZ recently: [same info here on the appropriate F-35C thread: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=26634&p=281944&hilit=Hipple#p281944 ]
Sea Control 28 (East Atlantic) – The F-35
March 2014 By LT Matthew Hipple speaking to STEVE GEORGE

"For the inaugural edition of Sea Control’s “East Atlantic” series, Alexander Clarke brings on Steve George, former engineer with the F-35 program and Royal Navy veteran to discuss the challenges and misconceptions of the F-35 program."

AUDIO: http://cimsec.org/wp-content/uploads/20 ... c-F-35.mp3 (28Mb)

Source: http://blog.usni.org/2014/03/31/sea-con ... c-the-f-35
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Unread post27 Dec 2014, 22:27

Ski Jumpin' Specs and an SRVL pilot view via computer sim in this video: [repeated elsewhere do ski jump info]

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Unread post05 May 2015, 10:27

Also posted today on another thread yet relevant here also: viewtopic.php?f=61&t=27140&p=290495&hilit=MILESTONES#p290495
F-35 2014 MILESTONES
2014 Annual Edition CODE ONE

"...31 December 2014 Flight Test Totals
The F-35 Integrated Test Force at Edwards AFB, California, and NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, exceeded 5,000 total flights in the System Development and Demonstration phase of the F-35 program. For 2014 alone, the program completed 1,354 test flights that covered 10,000 test points. The F-35B test fleet completed ninety-eight vertical landings, 297 short takeoffs, and 253 short landings."

Source: http://www.codeonemagazine.com/images/2 ... 8_7318.pdf (7.6Mb)
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Unread post25 Jun 2015, 01:11

SKI JUMP TEST part of this article is here: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=20138&p=293591&hilit=Jennings#p293591
F-35B begins 'ski-jump' trials for carrier operations
23 Jun 2015 Gareth Jennings, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly

"...Although the JSF programme is being chiefly driven by the United States, the UK is leading the way in developing technologies and techniques for employing the F-35B at sea. As well as the 'ski-jump', BAE Systems has developed a Bedford Array deck-lighting system (invented by a former UK Harrier pilot) to allow the recovery of the jet using the short rolling vertical landing (SRVL) method.

The SRVL landing technique involves the F-35B performing a conventional landing with a touchdown speed of just 30 kt relative to the ship's forward motion. This enables the aircraft to bring back significantly more fuel or munitions than possible with a standard vertical landing. The system works using a series of evenly spaced lights that run the length of the flight deck centreline. Only one light flashes at any given time, the specific light changing in sync with the pitching of the ship. This allows the pilot to focus on one point on the deck regardless of the relative movement of the ship for a relatively simple approach and recovery.

As part of this work Wilson himself has developed new helmet-mounted symbology, known as the Ship Reference Velocity Vector (SRVV), to help the pilot better judge his approach to the ship.

BAE Systems has also built a networked 180° panoramic cockpit position and a 180° panoramic landing safety officer (LSO) position to simulate and help train for carrier deck movements. While all of these technologies and techniques are being developed chiefly with the UK in mind, both the US Navy and US Marine Corps have shown strong interest and may well adopt some or all of the concepts for their own use."

Source: http://www.janes.com/article/52509/f-35 ... operations
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Unread post25 Jun 2015, 01:22

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Unread post26 Jun 2015, 07:40

UK Parliament SRVL TEST Question - 790 – Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft (Answered)
10 Jun 2015 Posted by Think Defence

"Douglas Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many successful shipborne rolling vertical landings have taken place using the F-35B with (a) an empty weapons load and (b) the maximum weight weapons configuration to date.

Mr Philip Dunne: No shipborne rolling vertical landings have taken place with an F-35B. The plan is to commence this activity in 2018 as part of First of Class Flying Trials. Ahead of these trials there is a range of de-risking work being undertaken which includes aircraft trials and synthetic modelling. The concept has already been demonstrated on the French carrier Charles de Gaulle using a modified Harrier aircraft. The primary approach aid was tested on HMS Illustrious."

Source: http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2015/06/7 ... -answered/
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Unread post20 Sep 2015, 16:26

This'll go here because it mentions a few creepy :mrgreen: things.... Single page PDF only attached below.
2015 STRIKE TEST NEWS
2015 Maj M. Andrew “Tac” Tacquard VX-23

"...F-35 Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) Mode
The F-35B team continued to expand the STOVL envelope last year in the clean wing configuration and with symmetric and asymmetric external stores. The process began with flying qualities testing in semi-jet, short takeoff, and jet borne modes to clear the aircraft for takeoff and landings. The team completed testing at airspeeds as low as 70 knots with 24,000 lb of asymmetry and jet borne with 10,000 lb of asymmetry. Next year, the team will feature jet borne testing to 19,000 lb of asymmetry.

Flying qualities during asymmetric testing were nearly identical to symmetric testing from the pilot’s perspective. The team performed Rolling Vertical Landings (RVL), Creeping Vertical Landings (CVL), Vertical Landings (VL), Slow Landings (SL), and Short Take Offs (STO) tests with nominal winds at Patuxent River. They continued landing and takeoff testing during a detachment to Edwards AFB, Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, California, and at NAWS China Lake. Testers focused on expanding the crosswind envelope with crosswinds of up to 25 knots. We also performed the first high altitude CVL and VL during the detachment.

The test team also conducted mission systems testing in the STOVL environment. Together, we accomplished Daytime STOVL Distributed Aperture System (DAS) testing during VLs. Additionally, we completed Nighttime DAS and Night Vision Camera (NVC) testing with the GEN III helmet. Testing included main runway-aided conventional takeoff and landings, SLs, and STOs. The team also conducted aided STOs and VLs during field carrier landing practice sessions at the expeditionary airfield aboard NAS Patuxent River.

Last, the first-ever F-35B ski jumps made aviation history June 19 and July 10 at the NAS Patuxent River Expeditionary Airfield. The ski jump tests — major milestones achieved by the joint U.S.-U.K. ski jump team — will determine the aircraft’s compatibility with British and Italian aircraft carriers. (The U.K. and Italy use the ski jump approach to carrier operations as an alternative to the catapults used aboard U.S. aircraft carriers. The U.K. and Italian carriers feature upward-sloped ramps at the bow of their ships. A ski-jump ramp simultaneously launches aircraft upward and forward, allowing aircraft to take off with more weight and less end-speed than required for an unassisted horizontal launch.)

Source: http://issuu.com/nawcad_pao/docs/striketest2015_single (3.6Mb)
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F-35B ONLY StrikeTest2015_single-pp1.pdf
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Unread post28 Sep 2015, 04:52

Relevant to wet deck CVF SRVLs potential. Bear in mind there is a computer generated matrix which determines the aircraft / deck conditions suitable for SRVL so I'll guess that 'wet deck' is factored in also. Don't ask what figures are.
Salty Dogs & Funky Jets
Oct 2015 Mark Ayton

"...Wet Runway Testing
It’s strange that wet runway testing must be conducted at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert. Annual rainfall on America’s east coast requires runways to drain away quickly and does not provide sufficient time to conduct wet runway tests.

The main Edwards runway is ideal for wet runway tests. It has a flat section that allows a sheet of water an eighth of an inch thick and a layer of AFFF (aqueous film forming foam, which is used for fire fighting) to be laid down. This gives a window of about five minutes when the runway is wet enough to meet the runway condition rating (RCR) criteria.

The pilot runs the aircraft up to the wet section at which point he applies moderate braking. Cdr Ted Dyckman explained: “That represents 60% peddle deflections while tracking down the runway to see how it stops to determine anti-skid performance. We have directional control points that indicate where the pilot enters the wet section and corrects back to centre line from an off set of 20 feet.

“We conduct two verification flying points. First we fly and land in the wet section to make sure there are no directional control issues. The F-35A and the F-35C each use similar types of main tyres but the F-35C’s double nosewheel configuration gives slightly better tracking performance than its single-wheel stablemates. The team conducted wet runway tests with normal field service tyres and carrier surface tyres. The latter simulates catapult launches and arrested landings back on the ship.

To prevent carrier surface tyres from rolling on the deck because of the side forces applied they are inflated to a higher pressure which makes them track well but hydroplane. They also take further to stop because the tyre’s surface area in contact with the deck is reduced by the higher pressure. The field service tyres also tracked well and stopped in the same distance.

Test points were conducted at 60, [SRVL is approx. 60KIAS - not quite the same perhaps] 90, 110 and 130 knots using wet sections measuring 2,500, 3,000, 4,000 and about 6,000 feet respectively. As soon as the RCR meets the test point (measured by an instrumented truck tracking down the side of the section to avoid the painted centre line which would give a very inaccurate value) criteria, the pilot runs down the wet section replicating a landing run, conducts the braking test and clears the area. The truck remeasures the RCR value and records the time between the two for an average figure. During the directional test, when the main tyres run over the centre line, the aircraft skids slightly because of the effect of reduced friction on the paint. The test team completed the trials in mid-April.

Source: Air International OCTOBER 2015 Vol.89 No.4
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