Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize ACM

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2012, 09:43
by spazsinbad
Some time back now there was a discussion about this type of training via European technology, looks like it will soon be evident in USofA.

Embedded training F35 22 May 2011

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ade#197400
____________________

Live Virtual Constructive technology set to revolutionize air combat training
By: Dave Majumdar Washington DC 12 April 2012

http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... ng-370661/

"The US Air Force and Lockheed Martin are getting ready to demonstrate the first operational use of live virtual constructive (LVC) training technology on 26 April at Luke Air Force Base (AFB), Arizona.

The technology has the potential to revolutionize the way air forces train-particularly for aviators who will fly 5th generation machines like Lockheed's F-22 Raptor and F-35....

...LVC technology will have to demonstrate its capabilities operationally before the USAF allows its fighter pilots to use it. Luke AFB's F-16 squadrons will be the first to use LVC training if Air Education and Training Command gives the go-ahead.

"On the 26th [of April] we've got government folks from AETC down at Randolph [AFB, Texas] that are going to come visit," McCutchen says. "We will do a demonstration with live virtual constructives."

BEST to read it all at the JUMP!

RE: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2012, 14:17
by popcorn
Maybe they can develop this into an EA capability for misdirection.. spoof the bad guy into detecting threats that don't exist.

RE: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2012, 14:17
by popcorn
Maybe they can develop this into an EA capability for misdirection.. spoof the bad guy into detecting threats that don't exist.

RE: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2012, 22:50
by count_to_10
I'm kind of wondering why they need to be in real aircraft for this, rather than just a simulator.
Also, with the helmet mounted displays, why can't the avionics create an image of the target for the pilot to see WVR?

RE: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 13 Apr 2012, 22:59
by SpudmanWP
re:simulators - they can.. However, nothing beats the real thing.

re:HMD - no way as it would obfuscate the pilot's view of his cockpit and surroundings. Too confusing.

RE: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 04 Feb 2013, 03:11
by spazsinbad
Seems appropriate for this thread but of course youse may differ. Already we know that the RN/RAF have indicated that 50% of training time (similarly with USofA without being specific) have mentioned this same figure and now the CANUKs are going for it also. The RAAF have indicated how important simulators will be in their F-35 ops. The Dutch have developed a system newly in use for simulating threats etc....

Future Canadian fighter jocks to split simulator and real-world training time 03 Feb 2013 Murray Brewster, The Canadian Press

http://www.barrheadleader.com/article/G ... e=barcpart

"OTTAWA - Royal Canadian Air Force fighter pilots of the future could be spending almost as much time in a simulator as they do in the cockpit under a revised training regime that has its eyes on the bottom line as much as technology, say internal documents....

..."We're probably going to move towards a training plan that is probably going to be 50 per cent (simulation), 50 per cent flying, which is much different than what we've got now," Blondin said in an interview with The Canadian Press last fall.

"I'm a strong believer in simulation. I can transfer a lot of that training (into) simulation."

Currently air force fighter pilots spend about 20 per cent of their advanced training time practising in simulators and 80 per cent in the air with the actual jet....

..."We need to create that virtual world," Blondin said.

"If I can do this I'm reducing my operational costs. I am reducing the carbon footprint. It's one way for me to approach the budget restriction we're going to see in the future, so I certainly want to go there."

In the context of the F-35, Blondin said the concept of a virtual training unit has been kicked around, something that would replace an operational training unit and the need to set aside aircraft for instruction.

It would involve setting up a "squadron" of 16 simulators, and when pilots needed actual cockpit time, they could use front-line aircraft.

The concept is particularly important in light of the Harper government's insistence on buying only 65 F-35s, the minimum the air force says it needs to carry out its duties.

Combat aircraft other than the stealth fighter could also be supported through a virtual training regime.

The expanded use of simulators would be for advanced "combat-ready" training.

Many front-line pilots complain they join the air force to fly, not to spend time in a simulator. But Blondin counters that the new training regime is being developed for the next generation of pilots who are more at home in a "virtual world."

Once again in the context of the F-35, Blondin said the simulator training would be "better than anything you can fly at night 25,000 feet over Bagotville," Que, where CF-18s are now based.

He said real-world training exercises, using a series of jets pitted against once another, are expensive, and increase the risk of an adversary monitoring and evaluating pilots."
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Searching on 'NLR' on the F-35 Forum will get the Dutch simulation info:

http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... nlr#235409 (stroll UP & down)
&
http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... nlr#227929
________________________

Searching on 'Simulation' on the F-35 forum will get more than enough info.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Dec 2013, 15:37
by spazsinbad
ECATS: training with combat aircraft, any time, any place 02 Dec 2013 NLR - National Aerospace Laboratory
"Dutch Space and the National Aerospace Laboratory of the Netherlands (NLR) will present the 'Embedded Combat Aircraft Training System' (ECATS) at the I/ITSEC conference in Orlando, Florida, from 2 to 5 December 2013. ECATS is a training simulation program that will be built as standard feature into the F-35. It provides fighter pilots with a possibility to exercise combat scenarios with virtual air and ground opponents during a training flight. Using ECATS it is possible to train the extensive capabilities of the F-35 anywhere and at any desired time more realistically, more effectively and more efficiently.

The latest addition to ECATS has opened up the possibility integrate flight simulators and other Live, Virtual and Constructive training assets in the training flight. ECATS can either be used as part of a larger LVC system capability or stand-alone on single ship or multi ship training flights without any need for ground infrastructure.

Dutch Space and NLR have prepared together with Lockheed Martin a Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) demonstration for the I/ITSEC 2013. ECATS is an important part of the new LVC training system of Lockheed Martin. Integrated LVC systems are the training systems of future. By integrating real weapon platforms with simulators and computer-generated opponents through ECATS, it is possible to make optimum use of advanced training facilities, with the aim of providing better and cheaper training.

For the development of the system Dutch Space and NLR used their in-depth knowledge of aircraft systems and simulations and their multidisciplinary approach to training programs. The organizations have been working together since the late 1990s on Embedded Training products for LVC applications in support of the 4th and 5th generation fighter pilot community. At the start of 2009 Lockheed Martin gave the green light for the implementation of the ECATS embedded training system in the F-35, resulting in delivery in 2012.

Smart Bandits: combat training with intelligent opponents
NLR will also be presenting at I/ITSEC the 'Smart Bandits' training system for combat aviators. The system simulates intelligent opponents who exhibit human behavior. This makes the way opponents behave more realistic and increases the value of training.

Tactical missions presuppose that aviators adapt their tactical plans to the prevailing situation and anticipate the behavior of opponents: where are my opponents located and what tactical plan of attack will they use? Until recently virtual opponents exhibited 'one-dimensional' and pre-programmed behavior. With Smart Bandits, NLR is introducing virtual opponents who respond autonomously and who independently take realistic decisions.

NLR developed Smart Bandits by drawing on its exceptional expertise in the field of simulation techniques, training programs and behavioral psychology. Smart Bandits has been extensively tested in NLR's Fighter 4 Ship research and training facility."

http://www.noodls.com/viewNoodl/2117544 ... -any-place

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 10 Dec 2013, 05:19
by spazsinbad
Reasonable possie for this info - not worth a new thread due all 'pie in the sky' so far....

“Aptima is leading the research to figure out how much the fidelity would have to be increased and how in order to complete a significant portion of aircraft carrier landing training in a simulator.”

"SIMULATORS ARE CRUCIAL FOR TRAINING civilian and military personnel, and they have evolved over the years to provide varying levels of fidelity and training utility. Prior to this SBIR however, there was no standard tool for determining the appropriate level of fidelity in simulators to achieve specified training objectives, maintain trainee acceptance, and fit within budgetary constraints. Since adjusting fidelity to the right level drives budget and optimizes readiness, the team at Aptima was motivated by one simple question – is all that fidelity really necessary? While most pilots would say “yes,” Aptima challenged this widespread opinion. Specifically, they wanted to measure the correlation between fidelity and training effectiveness, and how much fidelity could be dialed down without compromising the integrity of the training. This led to the development of PREDICT – Predicting Requirements for Instructional Environment Design to Improve Critical Training.

All simulator-based training programs struggle with the same problem—identifying which objectives can be trained in lower- or higher-fidelity simulators, and which require training in the actual aircraft. Aptima’s vision was that PREDICT would be a tool that combines fidelity requirements defined by end-users, existing theory and research about fidelity, and objective performance data from fidelity experiments to support more informed decisions regarding the acquisition and use of training simulators. This was a vast difference from the baseline technology at the time, which provided data exclusively from end-users. This approach is problematic since it typically results in specifications for a simulator that exceed the amount of money available for development and/or acquisition. As a result, acquisition and training professionals must make difficult fidelity trade-off decisions.

...Aptima entered into a $2.8 million contract with NAVAIR to use PREDICT in landing carrier training. Currently, Aptima is in its second year of a 4-year Future Naval Capabilities project with ONR, focused on Live, Virtual, Constructive (LVC) training. This time, they are on the other end of the fidelity equation, investigating how fidelity can be dialed up for difficult tasks such as an F/A-18 landing on a carrier. Currently, there is no way around the fact that carrier landing training must happen in an actual aircraft. Aptima is leading the research to figure out how much the fidelity would have to be increased and how in order to complete a significant portion of this training in a simulator...."

http://www.dawnbreaker.com/about/public ... ofiles.pdf (1.1Mb) & http://www.aptima.com

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 11 Dec 2013, 22:21
by spazsinbad
Long article best read at source (for other LVC articles search F-35 forum for 'constructive' or whatever takes your fancy). Go Youse Good Gamers! :devil:

LVC Emerging as Premier Training Concept
I/ITSEC Attendees Discuss Cost Savings, Complex Threat Scenarios
11 Dec 2013 AARON MEHTA
"...As the name implies, the concept behind LVC is the integration of live, virtual and constructive assets for a training program. Imagine the Air Force’s traditional “Red Flag” training exercise, but instead of needing dozens of flying assets in the sky, the service would need to put up only four or five planes.

The red team in this scenario could instead be run on simulators across the country, while ground-based stations could set up constructive elements such as weather conditions or new mission scenarios with the flick of a switch....

...“The beauty is, you can generate that readiness by injecting into that cockpit constructive and virtual sophisticated red air assets that our folks don’t have the ability to train against today, [and] sophisticated surface-to-air threat emitters you don’t have the ability to train against today, and they appear into the cockpit exactly as they do in the real world,” said John Schwering, Boeing’s business development leader for Training Systems and Government Services....

...Next-generation aircraft, such as Lockheed Martin’s F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, could benefit greatly from LVC training.

“We’re looking at how we can use LVC training for the F-16, F-22 and F-35s, with the idea that F-35 could potentially benefit. This is a Lockheed investment,” said Mary Ann Horter, vice president for F-35 sustainment at Lockheed’s Global Training and Logistics business unit. “It’s still early, but I think there are real possibilities that could help us long term, and a program the size of F-35 could really see the benefits from the training perspective.”...

...“Long term, that can help not only form an ability to keep pilots current and reduce the cost of live flying, but with a fifth-gen airplane, airspace can become a challenge to really test what you need to,” Horter said. “So I think [LVC] would help with that, as well.”..."

http://www.defensenews.com/article/2013 ... ng-Concept

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 23 Jan 2014, 06:27
by spazsinbad
"Innovations in Air Combat Training" - The Blue Chair Chronicles - Published on Feb 21, 2013
"Cubic Defense Applications' director of business development explains Cubic'scontinuing role in the development of Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems. (Script)

0:02 Before joining the Cubic team, I served in the United States Marine Core for 26 years and in that career I was an FA-18 pilot.

0:16 I'm a director for business development at Cubic and I primarily support the air ranges product line. Cubic actually invented the first air combat maneuvering instrumentation system, which is now commonly referred to as ACMI. Cubic invented the system back in the early 70's and installed this first station at Marine Core Air Station Yuma, Arizona and it was for the Top Gun program.

0:36 Measuring the number of pilots that we've trained with our air combat training systems is challenging, in the millions, easily for the number of sorties that have been flown. Every U.S. Air Force, Navy, Marine Core, international guard, fighter pilot that eventually gets winged will train with a Cubic Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation system when they get to their first tactical aircraft.

0:57 Probably one of the most effective innovations in air combat training systems is pairing it up with electronic warfare threat emitter systems. So if you can use the ACMI system to queue the treat emitter system as opposed to using those very expensive radars, then you've saved yourself a lot of money. In addition, it is much more effective because it gives you a live monitor capability to watch and assess how pilots are doing in their defending against real threats, and it also allows you to record and debrief when you come back and the pilot can see how they performed.

1:30 The next big innovation that we are going to see with air combat training systems is incorporating what we call L-V-C or live, virtual and constructive technology and Cubic is the lead systems architect for this project.

1:43 Fifth generation air crafts have incredible capability at their disposal both on-board sensors and weapons. So to really challenge this pilot and their weapon system to its fullest extent today, we need to be able to inject more threats into the training scenario and L-V-C promises to do that."


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2014, 20:49
by southernphantom
"Carbon footprint" was mentioned. This guy just lost a truly [i]massive[i] amount of credibility.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2014, 21:33
by Gums
Salute!

TNX, Phantom. Same here!!! Sheesh - always trying to be politically correct, Moriarity.

BTW, until the sims can have 7 - 8 gees and cases of gee-loc, ain't gonna be the same.

Seems to me that in actual flight, you could put threat radars and simulated aircraft on the displays of the F-35, and have a few real attackers out there to encourage visual lookout and such. Plus real lock-on indications and such.

Gums opines...

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2014, 21:50
by spazsinbad
:mrgreen: It ain't speshul apparently until someone says GAMECHANGER! :mrgreen:

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2014, 22:01
by spazsinbad
Hmmm... some sutherners must have been watching a different video. I have listened to the video above twice and read the script (which seems accurate) to not hear 'carbon footprint'? WOT? Is the 20 year USMC veteran F-18 pilot cred restored?

"Innovations in Air Combat Training" - The Blue Chair Chronicles 21 Feb 2013
"Cubic Defense Applications' director of business development explains Cubic's continuing role in the development of Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems.
(Script)
0:02 Before joining the Cubic team, I served in the United States Marine Core for 26 years and in that career I was an FA-18 pilot.

0:16 I'm a director for business development at Cubic and I primarily support the air ranges product line. Cubic actually invented the first air combat maneuvering instrumentation system, which is now commonly referred to as ACMI. Cubic invented the system back in the early 70's and installed this first station at Marine Core Air Station Yuma, Arizona and it was for the Top Gun program.

0:36 Measuring the number of pilots that we've trained with our air combat training systems is challenging, in the millions, easily for the number of sorties that have been flown. Every U.S. Air Force, Navy, Marine Core, international guard, fighter pilot that eventually gets winged will train with a Cubic Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation system when they get to their first tactical aircraft.

0:57 Probably one of the most effective innovations in air combat training systems is pairing it up with electronic warfare threat emitter systems. So if you can use the ACMI system to queue the threat emitter system as opposed to using those very expensive radars, then you've saved yourself a lot of money. In addition, it is much more effective because it gives you a live monitor capability to watch and assess how pilots are doing in their defending against real threats, and it also allows you to record and debrief when you come back and the pilot can see how they performed.

1:30 The next big innovation that we are going to see with air combat training systems is incorporating what we call L-V-C or live, virtual and constructive technology and Cubic is the lead systems architect for this project.

1:43 Fifth generation air crafts have incredible capability at their disposal both on-board sensors and weapons. So to really challenge this pilot and their weapon system to its fullest extent today, we need to be able to inject more threats into the training scenario and L-V-C promises to do that."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eivlY94priA

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2014, 22:38
by Gums
Salute!

The quote was from the RCAF dude at beginning of this thread.

"If I can do this I'm reducing my operational costs. I am reducing the carbon footprint. It's one way for me to approach the budget restriction we're going to see in the future, so I certainly want to go there."

The global warming comment was not in the following posts.
++++++++

From my distant past, the sim for the A-7D was outstanding for nav and radar work. No hemispherical visual, just basic instruments and such. We could fly terrain following and use all the radar modes as if we were at night or poor WX.

Then I flew one of the first visual sim beasts that Goodyear was working on for the Eagle. Very nice, but still no gees and such.

Then I got to fly the F-20 and F-18 sims. One had awesome vis ( the Hornet). Could do ground attack, land on a boat, etc. Still not good enuf for A2A, but better than anything I ever saw.

+++++++

As I opined, it should be easy to project simulated threats and radar blips on the F-35 displays. Meanwhile, a few real, live adversaries can help you train and find out that pulling gees and having crappy weather improves your capability to get the job done.

Gums opines...

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 28 Jan 2014, 23:58
by Viperdiver
LVC ops in F-16 training will only slightly improve the quality of training due to resource and physical limitations. The test in April 2012 had some, but limited value.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 29 Jan 2014, 00:46
by spazsinbad
Wow, the 'ancient' carbon footprint was just that an ancient post. I have a photo from a museum of an A-7 simpit. I'll have to find and post it soonish. Hmmm the sim is not quite what I remembered - perhaps it looks like what Gums refers to in his post?

From: http://jsbsim.sourceforge.net/Newsletter_3_2.pdf USS Lexington Museum in FLA/USA

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 29 Jan 2014, 01:03
by spazsinbad
'viperdriver' so what will LVC be like for the F-35?

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 29 Jan 2014, 05:17
by Gums
Salute!

Spaz! The A-7D sim we had at The Beach was one of those six-axis motion base doofers. No visual outside the cokpit, but was the most advanced sim in USAF at the time. We had huge terrain "plates" that had elevation coded, plus fairly realistic radar depictions of structures, targets, bridges, etc. The two main ones were of Europe and the U.S. A mechanical sensor moved across them according to our plane's position. Very realistic IFR radar presentation. No gees, but the tilt of the cockpit helped to let you know you pulled back or pushed up, etc.

All this was in 1972, and we were way ahead of the airliner sims.

My point is you can have all the simulation you want, but for A2A you need to feel gees and be able to look around to add to all the cosmic sensors.

For A2G, a sim is just fine.

Gums sends...

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 29 Jan 2014, 06:06
by spazsinbad
Sounds amazing Gums for 1972. That old bird was really ahead of the curve eh. :D

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 31 Jan 2014, 21:00
by outlaw162
This is interesting.

In comparison, the A-7D simulator at Davis-Monthan in 1977 IIRC had no motion base, but did have the early Vital IV visual system (not dome hemispheric) which provided for a somewhat generic runway to takeoff or land on, an air-to-ground bomb circle to practice using the HUD point blank or slew visual aiming or CCIP. Don't remember for sure but I think it was internal computer console scoreable also. You could even strafe and see tracers and sparkly flashes on a strafe target. The specific scene I believe was selected at the instructor console.

It also had a cartoonish looking KC-135 with full director lights and you could exercise the A-7 AR system with appropriate ready, contact and disconnect indications on the AR lights. It even had an aircraft carrier to play with.

The ground map and TF radar indications, correlated with the PMDS were also excellent on this one, but IIRC the terrain database was US or Pacific theatre oriented at DM.

What it did have was a functional G-suit connection, with air, causing the G-suit to inflate when Gs were pulled as well as IIRC the seat cushion to inflate. Wouldn't actually gray you out :D , but did give a bit of the 'sense' of it artificially in the visual FOV IIRC.

In contrast, the F-16 simulator run by HRL at Williams AFB used a hemispheric dome visual projection with an F-16 cockpit just sitting centered in a big room like a planetarium. The digital visual database was fairly detailed & extensive and the presentation was good enough that lack of a motion base was hardly noticeable. It also had an active G-suit connection and G-seat cushion and visual gray out.

Then there was the TAC ACES air combat simulator at Luke AFB, with two 556 mod F-4 cockpits, one of which flew like a MiG-21-F-13. It had a black and yellow checkerboard visual background, camera projected moving aircraft models (F-4 & MiG-21) and also the G-suit & G-seat functions. Fights on.

One thing they all had in common (less so the F-16 dome) was they could make you actually feel nauseous. :shock:

They've come along way.

(Then there was the centrifuge at Brooks.)

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 31 Jan 2014, 23:30
by Gums
Salute!

Also interesting, Outlaw. Guess they kept the same sim there when I went thru in 1971. Except for visual.

The one sim we had at the Beach had full motion, and we even sent a troop thru uncommanded maneuvers for his last seesion before PCS to DM for A-10 cadre. Cranked the levers and beams all the way up and increased all the motions. What a hoot.

I can see a great sim for the F-35. Visual stuff is way ahead of what we had in the 80's. Don't care much about all the motion, as other stuff is more important.

- threat displays
- map stuff, so the guy can use radar to see and attack stuff. The A-7D sim at the Beach had those 4x 8 maps with altitude and ground stuff encoded. The sensor moved about according to our flight path and we had excellent radar displays, altitude and ground things.
- all the data fusion stuff the Stubby is supposed to have.
- hopefully, good visual to do things that can't be done using all the cosmic sensors and such. And then there's A2A when in close to a threat.

Gums sends...

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2014, 01:38
by spazsinbad
Just to clarify a point made in my cryptic last post above.... I was referring not only to the excellent A-7D of the day but especially to the A-7D simulator 'Gums' described. :drool: Jealous 'drool' for those days eh. And :drool: for the new F-35 FMS and the rest.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2014, 17:48
by cantaz
As the sims cannot replicate G force, wouldn't it be a good idea to put some sort of high G physiological visualization in place to improve simulator fidelity?

In some games, red out and black out were graphically represented by shrinking what's visible graphically based on player input, grey filters, etc. But those models are simplistic. Would it be possible to monitor a pilot's G training in the centrifuge and personalize a G-response chart for each pilot, along with how much effort (quantifying audible breathing and straining) the pilot used to counter the Gs. The sim monitors the pilot's control input and breathing noise, compares it to aircraft performance and pilot performance, and penalizes the sim's video's FOV and quality as appropriate. While we can't affect the pilot's actual vision, we can further increase the impression of dimming vision by playing with coloured cockpit lighting, and brightness and tint of the cockpit displays in conjunction with eventual coloured HMD.

And since the F-35's HMD tracks the pilot's head movement, in a fully enclosed sim, the direction of the pilot's eyes can be generalized and the tunnel vision effect can be applied accordingly. Plus there can be visual penalization for having a head orientation inappropriate for the G load the pilot's attempting.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 01 Feb 2014, 20:28
by spazsinbad
In the FMS AFAIK the HMDS is not used with an ersatz gizmo taking over as per the photo. How this affects your theories 'cantaz' I have no idea - I'm just pointing this out.

F-35 Lightning II Full Mission Simulator (FMS)
"The Joint Strike Fighter FMS includes a high-fidelity 360-degree visual display system and a reconfigurable cockpit that simulates all three aircraft variants for U.S. and international partner services."

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5269/5631 ... 38ec_o.jpg
&
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5221/5631 ... e2d2_o.jpg

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2015, 19:43
by spazsinbad
PARIS: Cubic takes air combat training to next generation
15 Jun 2015 Ellis Taylor

"With 40 years in the business, Cubic Global Defense is moving to bring forward the next generation of air combat training with its P5 combat training system.

Used by 15 air forces around the world, the system includes a wing-mounted pod and ground-based systems to offer real-time tracking of fighter jets and other assets during training missions. It is also fully integrated into the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

A major step forward with the system is the integration of the virtual environment is another key feature of Cubic’s systems, allowing real aircraft to fly alongside or against simulated threats during training exercises.

“Sometimes you don’t have all the aircraft you want to fly the missions, so you could have some guys flying in the simulator, especially if you have low density, high demand aircraft like Growlers or E-2s,” says Waylan Cain, senior programme manager air ranges at Cubic.

That integration also offers major cost savings for large scale exercises such as Red Flag, which often involve multiple numbers of aircraft and a “big logistics and sustainment tail,” Cain says.

“When you introduce things like the JSF and the F-22 as well, to make it a real scenario to task the airplane to its combat capability, its cost prohibitive to put that much metal in the air,” he adds.

Cubic is also able to integrate training systems used by ground forces, allowing for much better training of combat strike support missions."

Source: http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... on-413590/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2015, 23:06
by popcorn
It wouldn't be the same but how about wearing a metallic flight suit in a simulator equipped with electromagnets.? :devil:

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2015, 23:13
by spazsinbad
Is this a virtual reality simulator with a 3D headset? :devil: Does one lose one's teeth fillings? :doh: Electromagnetism ROOLS! :mrgreen:

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 15 Jun 2015, 23:25
by popcorn
spazsinbad wrote:Is this a virtual reality simulator with a 3D headset? :devil: Does one lose one's teeth fillings? :doh: Electromagnetism ROOLS! :mrgreen:

LOL... no worries, they get free dental in the military.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2015, 00:27
by spazsinbad
Flight Ready: U.S. Naval Test Pilot School: Live Virtual Constructive
Published on Jul 1, 2015 NAVAIRSYSCOM

"The next chapter in naval flight test training is here. The U.S. Naval Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, Maryland, recently adopted Live-Virtual-Constructive (LVC) simulation exercise technology into its capstone project for its students. LVC enhances training readiness and prepares pilots for a wide range of operational scenarios, especially ones that can’t be replicated in live training."


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2015, 07:57
by 35_aoa
Good promo video.....did not realize Cubic made ACMI/TCTS/TACTS. Think that guy may have been an instructor when I went through VMFAT-101 as a student back when, but I can't remember for sure.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 13 Jul 2015, 11:35
by spazsinbad
Best read at the jump because A LOT has been left out - CPFH and stuff like that - details.
Live, Virtual, Constructive: A New Paradigm For Training?
09 Jul 2015 Amy Butler | Aviation Week & Space Technology

"... with live virtual constructive (LVC) training, the simulator and constructive elements are combined with live flying. And the training can take place over vast distances because the pilots can take inputs from participants anywhere in the virtual realm.

Today’s “high-end” threat, operating in an anti-access/area-denied (A2/AD) environment where pilots must enter hostile airspace in order to engage targets, is also bolstering the case for LVC, industry and military sources say. “A2/AD is where you get the most bang for your buck with the fifth-gen platforms,” says Lou Olinto, business development senior manager for Lockheed Martin Mission and Training Systems.

“In the simulator environment, there will be certain issues, certain training tasks that you want to do on the ground because you just don’t want to put out certain missions or show certain capabilities in the aircraft . . . . Those are destined for the virtual constructive environment,” he says.

Live flying cannot fully replicate the threats in such a scenario, and war planners do not want to conduct such exercises in the open where tactics and procedures can be observed. “The capabilities of today’s advanced threats preclude even our best and largest ranges from providing the physical layout and density of a highly contested environment,” according to an Air Combat Command (ACC) official. “While we still need actual surface and airborne threat replicators to ensure the sensor apertures are viable, the end state of LVC will allow replication of an interaction with adversary capabilities without actually providing the ‘metal’ in the airspace.”...

...Maj. Gen. Jay Silveria, commander of the Air Force Warfare Center at Nellis AFB, Nevada—the service’s tactics schoolhouse—contends that using more LVC can reduce flying hour cost for mundane techniques. Airmanship will still require live cockpit time, as will tasks where pilots must experience the forces of extreme maneuvers. “Fighter sims cannot accurately replicate the physical forces encountered in flight and there’s no chance of ‘losing [an] air airplane’ or injuring someone,” the ACC official says. “Fighter pilots need to be able to make decisions and act under the stresses, or as close as we can get to them, encountered in combat.”...

...In the end, embracing LVC could fundamentally change the tenor of Red Flag, the prestigious exercises conducted throughout the year at Nellis to expose fighter pilots to the most stressing situations they will encounter outside of combat. Envision the best and brightest fighter pilots descending on Nellis, just outside Las Vegas, for what could be the most rigorous flying training of their careers.

The Red Flag of 2030, however, could consist of pilots flying at their home units and battling threats injected into their systems by virtual or constructive means. The flying could be harder—with injected futuristic threats—but the cachet of Vegas may be lost to history."

Source: http://aviationweek.com/defense/live-vi ... m-training

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 21 Jul 2015, 21:52
by spazsinbad
Another long post best read at source....
Manazir: Navy Preparing For Massive Simulated Training Center In Fallon NAS
21 Jul 2015 Megan Eckstein

"The Navy is laying the groundwork now to establish a massive training center by 2020 that will pull together 80 Navy personnel in simulators with additional Air Force simulators in a separate location and even more pilots in the sky, creating a training environment unlike anything the Navy can offer today.

Navy director of air warfare Rear Adm. Mike Manazir told USNI News on July 16 that the Navy is working towards opening an Air Defense Strike Group Facility at Naval Air Station Fallon in Nevada in January 2016 and upgrading it to an Integrated Training Facility in 2020, which would represent a great leap forward in live, virtual and constructive (LVC) training.

Today, the Navy can conduct live-constructive training, in which a live pilot up in the air reacts to computer-generated scenarios, and virtual-constructive training, in which a person in a simulator reacts to computer-generated scenarios. But connecting a pilot in the air with a pilot in a simulator to operate in the same constructive environment – a full LVC event – is a real technical challenge.

At issue is management of classified information.... [BS and Briganti are going to just luv it] :mrgreen:

...In January, the Navy will open the Air Defense Strike Group Facility in Fallon, which will include simulators for three Aegis cruisers, two E2-D Hawkeyes and eight F-18 aircraft, Manazir said.

“We can then constructively add a larger number of friendly forces – so you can simulate the aircraft carrier, you can simulate more cruisers,” he said. “You can simulate the bad guys. And you can build a scenario that would take the carrier strike group to whatever threat environment you want: South China Sea, maybe the Arabian Gulf, and it’s as if you were operating there.”

These simulators will all be connected and able to share classified data on the ground-based network, allowing about 35 personnel to operate the carrier strike group in a virtual-constructive training environment at the same time.

By 2020, the center will be expanded into an Integrated Training Facility, with 80 people in simulators for five cruisers, four E2-Ds, 12 F-18s, eight F-35C Joint Strike Fighters and two Unmanned Carrier-Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) vehicles, as well as integration to bring in F-35A and F-22 simulators from Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada....

...“Then, once we get that waveform, that classified pipe from the live airplane down to the facility, then picture this in 2020: when I get that live piece, now I can have a section of F-35s on either the Fallon range or over on Nellis,” he continued. “Their information is being piped down to the facilities in Nellis and Fallon, and they see and hear everything as if all of those entities are flying with them in those two ranges.”

The very act of bringing this many people into the same LVC event introduces a new level of human error, which Manazir said is a good thing. With a single aviator flying against an enemy plane in a simulator, the enemy can only do pre-programmed behaviors. With an aviator flying against another aviator in connected simulators, there is an element of unpredictability. But with 80 people in simulators, plus more in the sky, any one of them could accidentally mess up, like in real life; any one of them playing an adversary could act “wily” in a way a computer would never be able to recreate; and the sum of their human behaviors creates a much more true-to-life environment, Manazir said.

Ultimately, Manazir said he hopes this LVC training environment will help the Navy prepare its aviators and sailors for any scenario they could face overseas in a way they cannot do today...." [GO READ IT ALL AT SOURCE]

Source: http://news.usni.org/2015/07/21/manazir ... fallon-nas

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 22 Jul 2015, 03:35
by popcorn
What a great tool for training and evaluating joint tactics. Smart investment. Surely they'll be able to plug F-35B into their scenarios when required.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2015, 02:40
by popcorn

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2015, 05:19
by spazsinbad
F-35 Pilot Desk & FMS Full Mission Simulator Training


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2015, 06:36
by geogen
spazsinbad wrote:F-35 Pilot Desk & FMS Full Mission Simulator Training



LoL at the look on those guys' faces @ the 1:21 mark realizing they have a 2-ship F-16 hostile closing for a merge...

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 18 Aug 2015, 07:12
by geforcerfx
geogen wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:F-35 Pilot Desk & FMS Full Mission Simulator Training



LoL at the look on those guys' faces @ the 1:21 mark realizing they have a 2-ship F-16 hostile closing for a merge...


You mean realizing there is a 2 flight of F-16's 100nmi away who have no idea they are there and are about to be running from amramms.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 01:36
by popcorn
http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Securi ... 440101233/
More F-35 training systems ordered from Cubic Global Defense
SAN DIEGO, Aug. 20 (UPI) -- Cubic Global Defense is to produce and enhance the Air Combat Training System in the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the company has announced.

Included in the work contracted by Lockheed Martin Aerospace is the addition of an internally mounted sub-system of the P5 Combat Training System, or P5CTS, that enables the F-35 to maintain its stealth characteristics while training
The P5CTS is designed to provide secure, real-time and post-mission training for air-to-air, air-to-ground and surface-to-air combat missions by displaying live-air picture, recording mission data, and relaying time, space and positioning information between participating aircraft during training flights....

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 21 Aug 2015, 01:58
by sferrin
geforcerfx wrote:
geogen wrote:
spazsinbad wrote:F-35 Pilot Desk & FMS Full Mission Simulator Training



LoL at the look on those guys' faces @ the 1:21 mark realizing they have a 2-ship F-16 hostile closing for a merge...


You mean realizing there is a 2 flight of F-16's 100nmi away who have no idea they are there and are about to be running from amramms.


Shhhh. Don't burst his bubble. :wink:

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Sep 2015, 12:37
by Dragon029
LVC being conducted across continents in real time:


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 29 Oct 2015, 18:23
by spazsinbad
Better Training, Virtually
UNK Hank Hogan, Aviation Aftermarket Defense; ABDonline

LONG article best read at source & ALSO SLDinfo article - both URLs below.

Graphic: http://www.sldinfo.com/wp-content/uploa ... C-OV-1.png

Source: http://www.abdonline.com/news-analysis/ ... jJTjOm4YkK
&
http://www.sldinfo.com/plan-jericho-sha ... ng-system/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 30 Oct 2015, 07:14
by spazsinbad
Cubic Successfully Demonstrates Live Flight of Encrypted P5 Combat Training System
29 Oct 2015 PR Web Laura Chon

"Cubic Global Defense (CGD), a business unit of Cubic Corporation (NYSE: CUB), today announced the completion of its first live flight demonstration of the Cubic Miniature Encryptor (CME) in Lakeland, Florida with partner Draken International, operator of the largest privately-owned fleet of ex-military aircraft. During the flight demonstration, Cubic successfully showcased airborne encryption of the P5 Combat Training System (P5CTS) on tactical fighter aircraft, matching the environment of an air combat training mission. The CME is a mature encryption solution readily available to the P5CTS which will accomplish increased security for advanced air combat training as well as P5CTS pod and ground station encryption compatibility with the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)’s P5 Internal Sub-system.

The P5CTS is designed to provide real-time and post-mission training for air-to-air, air-to-ground and surface-to-air combat missions by displaying the live-air picture, recording mission data, and relaying Time, Space and Positioning Information (TSPI) between participating aircraft during training sorties. Key components of the system include GPS-enabled, aircraft-mounted airborne instrumentation “pods” plus ground stations, which help aircrew conduct, monitor and control air combat training and post-flight debriefing.

During the demonstration, two Draken fighter aircraft carried the encrypted P5 pods. A P5CTS Live Monitor ground station was also upgraded with CME, allowing the engineers to track the aircraft for the full duration of the flight, including taxi, takeoff and landing. The TSPI data and uplinked manual kill notification were successfully passed across the P5CTS encrypted data link. In addition, Cubic was able to verify backwards interoperability of the CME through an unmodified P5CTS Live Monitor ground station and an unencrypted pod on a third aircraft. This allowed the encrypted system to ‘see’ and relay the unencrypted data from the P5 pod, while the unencrypted system could relay, but not ‘see’ the encrypted P5 pods.

“As I go around the world and visit many of our international P5 customers, they make it clear that the demand for encryption is immediate. In response to this urgent need, Cubic invested in the development of the CME in order to fulfill that demand,” said Bill Toti, president of Cubic Global Defense. “The CME will help maximize investments made by the Department of Defense and our allied nations for P5CTS products and infrastructure, while minimizing disruptions to training worldwide.”

“Cubic is a leader in the Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation (ACMI) industry and we continue to make advancements with innovative, cost-effective and validated new offerings such as the CME,” said Michael Knowles, vice president and deputy general manager of Air Ranges, Cubic Global Defense. “The CME is a migration path for upgrades to air combat training system ranges, and encryption is one of the incremental upgrades needed to develop a true live, virtual and constructive (LVC) training capability.”

Cubic’s CME has the capability to encrypt sensitive information including increasingly complex fighter tactics, offering an immediate layer of security protection. Not only is CME a low-cost encryption solution for P5CTS pods, it is also designed to be interoperable with the JSF P5CTS, making it backwards and forwards compatible with P5CTS ranges. The CME has an additional advantage of serving as an inexpensive drop-in replacement of the Data Guard Processor (DGP) in P5CTS pods. This dual-purpose benefit allows combat training ranges to upgrade all or just some of their P5CTS pods as a DGP replacement, and choose when to use the encryption capability on training missions.

The successful flight demonstration of CME follows Cubic’s recent LVC demonstration at the Air Force Association’s annual Air & Space Conference and Technology Exposition in September. At the Air & Space Conference, Cubic teamed with industry partners to integrate a ‘live’ P5 ACMI pod with ‘virtual’ simulators and ‘constructive’ air and ground weapon systems in a virtual training environment. This particular demonstration was the first of its kind to show virtual and constructive entities through an architecture of Department of Defense’s fielded systems to the cockpit radar and radar warning receiver displays."

Source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/10/prweb13050732.htm

Screenshot shows Ex-A4G 883 then Ex-A-4K Kahu NZ6212 now DRAKEN N142EM with the ACMI P5CTS pod underwing


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 06 Aug 2016, 21:44
by spazsinbad
IAI Offers AACMI for International F-35 Users
03 Dec 2015 Show Daily

"Israel Aerospace Industries is focusing on the future air combat training needs of international customers for the F-35 Lightning II fighter.

“Our core product here is the well known EHUD Autonomous Air Combat Manoeuvring Instrumentation (AACMI) system,” Philip Fisch, Business Development Director for Stark Aerospace, an IAI North America Company, told the Show Daily.

“Seventeen different countries around the world, many in Europe and Asia, use the EHUD,” said Fisch. It was announced in 2014 that IAI’s MLM division, along with Elbit Systems, which also produces the EHUD, have between them built more than 1,000 EHUD pods for use on at least 20 different fighters including the A-4, AMX, F-4, F-5, F-15, F-16, F/A-18, Harrier, Hawk, Mirage family, Tornado, Typhoon, and MiG family aircraft. The system has logged more than 200,000 flight hours.

“The F-35 has a built-in AACMI capability which is compatible only with US [Cubic] AACMI systems,” said Fisch. “More than half of the international customers for the F-35 - including Italy, Norway, Singapore, Turkey and the UK - have the EHUD system. As the F-35 is being built today there will be no ability for those aircraft - the F-35 and in service fighters - to train together even though there is a requirement to fight together.”

“So we have developed a concept for a solution that will allow the F-35, with some modest upgrades, to have interoperability with our EHUD systems,” said Fisch. “The international users are very interested because they have a training problem that they are just beginning to think about because it is may be five years before F-35 users outside the US will have operational aircraft.”

Asked about Israel Air Force training plans, Fisch noted “there are some unique aspects of the Israeli F-35 and I am not allowed to talk about that”.

The EHUD system is named after an Israeli fighter pilot killed in a mid-air collision. “One of the main differences between our product and the US AACMI is that we include a ground and air collision warning system built into the pod that predicts if there is going to be a collision and the pilot receives an advisory telling him to make a maneuver. That saves many pilots and many aircraft.”


The EHUD AACMI provides advanced air-to-air and air-to-ground training as well as debriefing with real-time weapon simulation and scoring. A tracking and positioning system enables real-time ground monitoring and control. The newest EHUD generation enables advanced LVC training.

EHUD technology is incorporated into IAI’s Helicopter Training & Safety system (HTS) and the Naval Combat Maneuvring Instrumentation System (NCMI). “Some of our customers, which I can’t name, have used our system to integrate ground, naval and air assets into the same training exercise,” said Fisch.

Source: http://www.iitsec.org/Documents/IITSEC_ ... y4_web.pdf (10.5Mb)

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 12 Aug 2016, 22:38
by zerion
Air Force integrates 4th- and 5th-generation fighters
Michael Peck, C4ISRNET 11:18 a.m. EDT August 11, 2016

The Air Force has integrated fifth- and fourth-generation fighters using virtual simulations.

Virtual F-22s flown by pilots in simulators teamed up with real F-16s in the air, according to an announcement by Northrop Grumman, which provided the LVC Experimentation, Integration and Operations Suite (LEXIOS) system that enabled the collaboration.

"As part of Distant Frontier training at the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, Northrop Grumman integrated two virtual F-22 Raptor fifth-generation fighters to fly and train alongside four live fourth-generation F-16 Fighting Falcons," Northrop Grumman said.

The virtual F-22s were flown by pilots in simulators at Joint Base Elmendorf–Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska. The F-16s were flown by the 80th Fighter Squadron, which is normally based at Kunsan Air Base, South Korea.


http://www.c4isrnet.com/story/military/ ... rd%20Brief

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 31 Oct 2016, 12:46
by spazsinbad
:shock: This stuff must be amazing and MORE AMAZIN' when the F-35 FMS Full Mission Simulator is plugged into the NETWORK - the World Wide Wicked Web of ChickenMaaaannnnnn...... :mrgreen: https://archive.org/details/Chickenman- ... Everywhere
ANALYSIS: New tech changing air combat training, but revolution still ahead
31 Oct 2016 Stephen Trimble

"...Largely driven by the pending influx of hundreds of US and international F-35s, the USAF is exploring breakthrough technologies for enabling “live-virtual-constructive” (LVC) training on a grand scale.

LVC represents a new form of air combat training. It blends three elements: live assets in the form of real flying aircraft, virtual systems composed of aircraft and aircrew simulators, and constructive elements created with computer programmes.

Ideally, an LVC scenario would make air combat training more realistic by blending hundreds of platforms, weapons and sensors into a shared synthetic environment, which would otherwise be too expensive and complicated to assemble on a training range with only live assets. Imagine a training scenario with a multinational formation of F-35s, command and control aircraft and tankers flying mission rehearsals together. Arrayed against them are an assortment of accurately portrayed ground and aerial weapons systems with the full spectrum of kinetic and electronic attack options....

...LVC capabilities today are growing, but they are insufficient to meet future demand. Within a decade, Lockheed expects to have delivered more than 1,000 F-35s globally, including hundreds to the USAF alone. The introduction of a fifth-generation fighter in such vast numbers will pose a challenge to an already strained air combat training system. By combining supersonic speed, radar stealth and advanced onboard sensors, F-35s may find it difficult to train effectively against older aircraft types....

...Lockheed is now under contract with the USAF to integrate domed simulators developed for the F-35 into the DMON, Scott says. The schedule to complete that integration is still under discussion within the USAF. When that occurs, however, it will be only the first step to allowing the F-35 to participate in LVC. In addition to simulator integration, the F-35 also requires the USAF to develop a new waveform that can handle the data, latency and classification level required for LVC.

Like all previous USAF fighters since the mid-1970s, the F-35 comes equipped with a system that transmits the aircraft’s positional data during air combat training events. In previous fighters, the distinctive Cubic P5 combat training system (CTS) pod is mounted on a wing station during exercises. The podded solution does the job for fourth generation fighters, but a wing-mounted store on the F-35 would betray the aircraft’s stealth signature. So Cubic developed the P5 internal subsystem for the F-35.

Another complication posed by the F-35 is the classification level of the information transmitted by the P5 pod. In fourth generation fighters, such information is not considered sensitive and is transmitted openly without encryption. The US military has chosen to apply classification levels to F-35 positional data, which required Cubic to encrypt the signal transmitted by the P5 internal subsystem.

There are also limitations with the P5 waveform itself. Northrop’s Guy notes that the P5 has a high-capacity downlink, but an extremely limited uplink. In an LVC environment, Northrop’s LEXIOS needs to transmit volumes of positional and sensor data up to each live aircraft in order to keep everyone on the same page. Right now, the system relies on Link-16 to transmit the required information, but neither Link-16 nor the P5 is able to handle the volume of data from airborne sensors, let alone the capacity required as F-35s enter training ranges in large numbers. Moreover, neither Link-16 nor the P5 can handle multi-level security access.

So the USAF is in the early stages of developing a new waveform dedicated to LVC, says Tim Welde, a senior business development manager for Cubic....

...The cost of developing a new waveform and associated software and hardware is only the beginning. New pods must be procured and then installed and qualified on the fourth-generation fighter fleet. The P5 internal subsystem for the F-35 must be replaced with a new LVC subsystem, Welde adds. The LVC capability also requires reprogramming the fighter’s operational flight programme....

...Such technology will not be available for at least seven or eight years in any case, but industry officials are developing ways to make more use of existing LVC systems. For example, Northrop is working on a way to allow LEXIOS to handle data with multiple levels of classification. That could help integrate F-22s and F-35s more into LVC training, as well as bringing in international participants.

Cubic, meanwhile, is developing a new technology for specialised Red Air aircraft. Several private companies, such as Dynamic Aviation and ATAC, provide fleets of third-generation fighters, such as Douglas A-4s and Northrop F-5s, for air combat training with the USAF and Navy. Due to the age of these aircraft, many are not equipped with radars and other sensors. They do, however, carry P5 CTS pods, Welde says.

These pods carry the positional data of the Blue Air forces involved in the same training scenario. So Cubic is working to transmit the data from the pod to a kneeboard-mounted tablet, giving the Red Air pilot situational awareness as if the aircraft had a radar or other sensors, Welde says. The so-called Bandit Board could also be used by the Red Air pilot to command the P5 pod to emulate a radar signal, giving the Blue Air forces another training option."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ut-430639/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 01 Dec 2016, 01:51
by spazsinbad
Live Training Alone Will No Longer Cut it for F-35, B-21 Pilots
30 Nov 2016 Yasmin Tadjdeh

"ORLANDO, Fla. —  Live exercises by themselves will no longer be a sufficient method to train Air Force personnel flying F-35s and the upcoming B-21 bomber, a senior service official said Nov. 29.

“Live exercises have been the standard by which we train like we fight,” said Gen. Ellen M. Pawlikowski, commander of Air Force Materiel Command. “However, the resources required for living training are costly and in today’s complex environment, don’t offer the required density or fidelity to accurately depict modern combat.”

Live, virtual and constructive training — which combines simulation, live training and computer models to create a comprehensive virtual environment, will be the new standard, she predicted.

The high cost of live training poses a serious readiness issue, particularly as adversaries rapidly develop technologies to counter U.S. capabilities, she said during a video message broadcasted at the National Training and Simulation Association’s annual Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference.

Because of test range limitations, the cost of sophisticated munitions and limited weapon system availability, the Air Force must turn to LVC to provide airmen with a rich training experience, Pawlikowski said.

LVC will “increase realism and robustness in the integrated joint training environment,” she added. It can be used to train in all operational domains, including air, land, sea, space and cyber. 

Maj. Gen. Robert D. McMurry Jr., commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory, said LVC training would eventually be baked into all weapon platforms. It “is going to be just incredible in terms of how we develop, how we procure, how we test, how we deploy, how we train and how we sustain systems,” he said.

The goal is to put airmen in the most realistic operational environments possible, he said. In the past that was the Red Flag exercise held at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. With LVC technology, training could be even more robust, he added.

LVC will in the coming years be used to train F-35A joint strike fighter pilots. “The goal is to bring it to the F-35 in the ‘20s,” McMurry said. “That’s going to be essential to its success.”

Lynda Rutledge, program executive officer for Air Force agile combat support and LVC training, said the F-35 is the “primary driver for LVC” because its training requirements differ significantly from legacy platforms.

The training infrastructure that the Air Force currently has does not meet the needs of the F-35, said Maj. Gen. Thomas Deale, director of operations for Headquarters Air Combat Command.

“When we’re training at that fifth-generation level, we’re talking airspaces the size of … Utah and Nevada just to get to the amount of capability needed to train at that level,” he said. LVC is one way to create such an expansive amount of space virtually, he said.

Such technology will also be useful in training for anti-access/area denial environments, he added....

...“We have huge opportunities to learn lessons” from aircraft such as the F-35 as they adopt LVC technology, he said. “It gives us here an opportunity to have LVC built into the platform and the simulators and the entire construct as we build it because of course we haven’t yet produced a system.”

Rutledge said the Air Force is just getting started in investing in LVC technology.

“Although LVC has been in discussion over the past several years, there’s really not been a formal program of record established to create a cross-domain, cross-enterprise approach to take full advantage of a lot of technologies that we really have at our doorstep right now,” she said. 

LVC will eventually touch every part of the service “and then on frankly to joint and NATO partners,” she said."

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... px?ID=2360

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 01 Dec 2016, 01:57
by spazsinbad
I/ITSEC 2016 - Vice Admiral Paul Grosklags ["CHALLENGES of LVC"]
NTSAToday Published on Nov 29, 2016

"Vice Admiral Paul Grosklags discusses the importance and innovation of I/ITSEC."


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 04 Dec 2016, 19:40
by spazsinbad
Future force philosophy: Operators grapple with the art of fifth-generation pilot training
02 Dec 2016 Gareth Jennings

"...the United States Air Force (USAF) with the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor and the USAF and US Marine Corps (USMC) with the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) - that currently operate fifth-generation platforms, pilot training has largely followed the traditional path that has been used over decades for older generation aircraft. With more and more fifth-generation aircraft now entering service across the world, however, operators will increasingly have to marry up ongoing requirements to train for its older generation platforms with those for its newest ones....

...[a senior USAF official noted] "The difference between fourth and fifth generation is basically in the way that you employ an aircraft that is stealthy; in the way that you use sensor fusion; the [super cruise] speed of the aircraft; employing avoidance versus engagement; the concept of autonomous operations; the use of signature management and network integration; and how to integrate with a fourth-generation aircraft that is on your side. There are a lot of challenges from a pilot perspective, like the time compression you experience in the F-22 due to the high speeds, and the fact that even your friends cannot see you....

As the USAF official explained, "Fifth-generation aircraft have challenges for training, with the geography of ranges not being large enough to accommodate their advanced sensors. Also, the new sensors that we will have you may not want to turn on during training for mission security.

"Third- and fourth-generation aircraft require large numbers of adversary aircraft for them to sense and to react to - that's very expensive and hard to generate. The USAF uses a ratio of 4:1 for Red Air to Blue Air for training sorties, which means either using the very expensive frontline platforms [at which time all of our frontline pilots are pretending to be 'bad guys' and so not really learning what we want them to learn], or we look more closely at the synthetic environment.

"In the past, the highest end training that we could offer our pilots was at Red Flag, but even that range is limited in size. There is no range in the world that is big enough to do fifth-generation training as you'd really like to do it - this forces you back into the synthetic environment, which now requires very high fidelity and expensive simulators. That's the only way that you can do it, though....

...Despite the expected increase in reliance on synthetic training, the official conceded that the provision of real-world flight training will remain critical to turning out fully formed fighter pilots. "What you use the live training (the most expensive part, and the part that burns through airframe hours) for is the dynamic part such as manoeuvring. All the things that a simulator cannot do well - replicating spatial disorientation, pilot stress and fatigue, etc - you still have to do in an airplane," he said....

...This was a viewpoint that was backed up by an Israeli Air Force official speaking at the same event under the Chatham House Rule, who said that, while simulation will become an ever important training tool for the Israeli Air Force as it stands up its F-35A 'Adir' force, the service will remain heavily focused on real-world training for those events that cannot be replicated synthetically. "I don't think that we will be able to say that we will do 90% synthetic in the future and 10% real, because you'll still have to expose the pilot to the full spectrum of the mental, physical, and cognitive load that they will only experience in the air. We could maybe go to 75% to 35% [in favour of simulation] in the future, but certainly not more than that."...

...While current fourth-generation aircraft carry an external pod, the airborne sub-system for the F-35 is internalised and integral to the aircraft, so as to maintain the platform's stealth characteristics (all F-35 customers except Israel, which has its own system, will use this). Cubic is currently under contract to deliver 500 boxes through low-rate initial production (LRIP) 11 for the F-35, of which more than 150 had been delivered by mid-2016. The box goes live in the F-35's Block 3F software block (full combat capability) due in the third quarter of 2017, and Cubic is currently undergoing testing with the system. The US Department of Defense (DoD) has also contracted the company to deliver encryption to the ground sub-system for classified briefings.

Following Block 3F, there will be further upgrades of the P5 system, Cain said. "Initially, [the DoD] will be using it really just as a 'live monitor' to assess training in real time. For the future it will be looking to encrypt the fourth-generation pods and open up the datalink to share data and information back and forth across [the different generation platforms]."
Beyond these enhancements, Cain noted that a new way of teaching fifth-generation pilots will be needed, as the current methods are not sustainable due to their costs, and that Cubic is already forging ahead with this in developing its LVC technologies.

"One thing that everyone is agreed on today is that we can't just keep sending up more and more capable 'Blue Air' against an ever increasing number of adversary aircraft - it's just cost prohibitive. Also, you can't tax the fifth-generation aircraft's sensor suites and weapons in a cost effective or realistic manner.

"We want to go to the LVC, which is the next evolution from P5. Today, if I have four 'Blue Air' F-15s, it takes roughly about 12 other aircraft to generate a problem for them. The F-35 is so much more advanced that you now need sometimes as many as 20 more airplanes and a bunch of surface threats - those things cost a lot of money. Also, you sometimes don't want to use your full capabilities on a training range, you want to internalise them based on a virtual constructive system of networked simulators that can be your virtual wingmen."

In August 2016 the USAF conducted its first integration of fourth- and fifth-generation fighter aircraft during an LVC event. As part of the Distant Frontier training exercise at the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, Northrop Grumman integrated two virtual F-22 Raptor fifth-generation fighters to fly and train alongside four live fourth-generation F-16 Fighting Falcons operating out of Eielson Air Force Base (AFB). The synthetic F-22s were operated by members of the 90th Fighter Squadron from simulators at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska...."

Source: http://www.janes360.com/images/assets/9 ... aining.pdf (0.8Mb)

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2016, 09:42
by spazsinbad
An incomplete series of excerpts would not do this article justice - so here is the wall of text.
Air Force Seeks Virtual Elements in Flight Exercises to Heighten Realism, Complexity
05 Dec 2016 Valerie Insinna

ORLANDO, Fla. — With live training alone unable to provide the complex scenarios meant to push the F-35 to its limits, the US Air Force is banking on a suite of cutting-edge technologies that will fuse virtual and constructive elements into live exercises.

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is about halfway through the technology demonstration phase of the [b]Secure Live, Virtual and Constructive Advanced Training Environment (SLATE) program
, which will secure the technologies needed to give pilots as close of an experience as they can get to an actual battle.

The program is set to begin demonstrating the system aboard F-15E Eagles and Navy F/A-18s in 2018, but the technology probably won’t be ready for the F-35 and other fifth-generation aircraft until the mid 2020s, said Maj. Gen. Robert McMurry, AFRL commander.

“We’ve learned over the past that our training systems are not up to the task that we have,” he said during a Nov. 29 keynote speech at the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education (I/ITSEC) conference in Orlando. “The cost of bringing live training environments and exercise environments to the level of fidelity that we really need to simulate what we would expect to be a conflict environment is probably cost prohibitive.”

Live, virtual and constructive (LVC) training has become a buzzword in the simulation industry over the past couple years, but SLATE is not about merely developing the capability for LVC assets to train together, said Dave “Moses” Noah, SLATE program manager at AFRL. A true LVC environment uses virtual and constructive elements to make live training as realistic as possible, enabling highly complex and advanced scenarios.

When the Air Force conducts live training today, there are elements of make believe that keep the pilot from having a truly immersive experience. For instance, an F-15E flying against an F-16 functioning as an aggressor aircraft will still see an F-16 on its radar shooting American weapons, he told Defense News.

But once SLATE is integrated into the fleet, that F-15E will be able to see the F-16 as a MiG-29, or any other adversary aircraft, on all of its sensors and displays. The idea is to more accurately replicate the conditions of battle, including simulating various environments, adversary weapons and other systems not in the US inventory.

"When we take off, go around the area and point at each other, I have the radar cross section signature of a MiG-29, I have all of the radar emissions of a MiG-29, so when I lock him up, he doesn't see on his radar warning receiver a symbol for an F-16. He sees a MiG-29,” Noah said.

"The first time that he knows that I'm not a MIG-29 is finally, at let's say 2.1 miles, gets a visual on me,” he said. "Up until then, he doesn't know."

Once SLATE is integrated, an F-15E in the training simulation will see the F-16 as a MiG-29, or other adversary aircraft, on all of its sensors and displays.

AFRL is overseeing the development of three key technologies for the program: a radio waveform that can manage the unprecedented throughput of data between the different LVC assets, high-level data encryption that keeps sensitive information like radar signatures from proliferating, and a multi-level security system that allows different data to be passed to US and international assets depending on the level of classification.

The waveform, called the Fifth Generation Advanced Training Waveform (5GATW) has been fully developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory and performed final flight tests in September, Noah said. During the tests, Lincoln Labs stressed the waveform by passing as much data as possible between ground stations and two aircraft, an L-29 and Dassault Falcon 20 owned by the labs.

Cubic is responsible for the rest of the system, including creating the encryption and security architecture as well as manufacturing a software-defined radio about the size of a smartphone capable of managing and processing the 5GATW, said Mike Knowles, vice president of air ranges. It’s also making the ground support system that will provide connectivity between the LVC elements.

Over the upcoming months, the company will integrate those technologies — along with an antenna, power amplifier and a processor — together into a pod that will be attached to fourth-generation aircraft.

“Inside our labs as systems integrator in San Diego, we’re already putting together the software-defined radio, the waveform we integrated, the multi-level secure architecture and the ground station,” he said. “So in our lab now, we’re at the point where we can do simulated connectivity of the system, so we can test out and verify the communications. The encryption system is already under the NSA [National Security Administration] process for certification.”

During I/ITSEC, the company showcased some of the systems that will be encapsulated into the pod, which will be about the size of an AIM-9 Sidewinder missile. For fifth-gen jets like the F-35 and F-22, more engineering will be required to internally install the capability, preserving its low observability. That’s not a part of SLATE's technology demonstration phase and will be done later on when the service starts an acquisition program, but Cubic has proposed some ideas to AFRL on how the core systems could be integrated into the joint strike fighter (JSF).

“For JSF, it’s not going to be that hard. [For] a lot of the SLATE components, the hardware is designed to be able to be able to port into JSF in the future,” said Tim Cockerham, a senior principal systems engineer for Cubic. For instance, some of the technologies used for SLATE could replace older processors or other subsystems that are larger in size.


The Air Force has committed $49 million for the technology development phase, and the Navy plans to add about $20 million of its own funds.

AFRL and Cubic are going to continue testing and developing SLATE over the next year. Three two-week demonstrations at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, which will include Navy participation, are planned in 2018, Noah said.

The first demo, planned for March, involves a couple F-15Es and F/A-18s interfacing with some virtual and constructive players​. “We’re just making sure we have connectivity out on the range at Nellis,” he said.

Another demonstration in May increases the number of actors and the influx of data being exchanged. The capstone event in October will take it up yet another notch: up to 16 live aircraft acting as blue forces, additional live aggressor forces, and then “a classified number” of virtual and constructive forces.

“But it’s going to be a lot because we want to show how much the system can handle,” he said.

Future Acquisition
Once technology development ends, it will be up to the service to spin SLATE into a competitive program of record. That’s not exactly an easy thing to do in this fiscal environment for a capability that will cost billions, and possibly tens of billions, Noah said. However, the service’s Life Cycle Management Center, the acquisition arm of Air Force Materiel Command, has designated employees to help ensure a smooth transition.

“They come to work in our building just to be joined at the hip with what AFRL is doing with SLATE,” he said.

AFRL is already engaged in regular meetings with Air Combat Command — which has been designated the lead command for LVC platforms — and with Lynda Rutledge, the program executive officer for the agile combat support directorate, who is in charge of acquiring simulators.

The acquisition strategy has not been finalized, but “this is going to be multiple programs of record because LVC is so huge,” he said.

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/articles/air ... complexity

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 07 Dec 2016, 12:51
by madrat
Kind of redefined the idea of chasing the bogeyman

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 22 Jan 2017, 15:32
by spazsinbad
Flight Ready: Live, Virtual, Constructive
Published on Jan 18, 2017 NAVAIRSYSCOM

"Navy leadership discusses the value of Live Virtual Constructive and the positive impact it is going to have on training and fleet readiness."


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 04 Mar 2017, 00:01
by spazsinbad
Air Force Investing in Live-Virtual-Constructive Technology
03 Mar 2017 Vivienne Machi

"ORLANDO, Fla. — The U.S. Air Force will rely on a blend of live, virtual and constructive techniques to prepare its airmen to fight future battles in multiple domains at once and across disciplines, service leaders said March 3. The need to prepare for fusion warfare — where a battle is fought against near-peer state actors as well as non-state actors and incorporates members of all the services on land, at sea, in the air, in space and in cyberspace — dominated conversations at the Air Force Association’s annual Air Warfare Symposium.

Systems and platforms that employ a combination of live, virtual and constructive, or LVC, technology play “perfectly” into that situation, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein told reporters. “I’m never going to send a single platform into combat, I’m always going to send a family of systems that connect together, and that family is not only going to be Air Force,” he said. “LVC plays perfectly into that because it’s all about the network.”

The service’s Air Education and Training Command will use LVC to “create environments that we can’t replicate in reality,” said its commander, Lt. Gen. Darryl Roberson. “When you’re trying to integrate space and air and cyber in the real world, you’re limited on what you can do,” he said.

The constructive simulation component is particularly helpful for analysis, said Acting Air Force Secretary Lisa Disbrow. “Analysis drives [concept of operations], it can drive investments, it can uptake our force,” she said.

LVC technology could be beneficial as the Air Force looks to conduct more experiments ahead of procurement processes, Goldfein noted....

...“We want to get to 60 F-35s [joint strike fighters] as soon as possible,” she [Disbrow] said. The service’s fiscal year 2017 base budget includes funding for 43 F-35 aircraft, she said, adding that refreshing the fleet of F-15 Eagle tactical fighters, F-16 Falcon fighters and the legacy bombers is also in the mix...."

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... px?ID=2431

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 12 Nov 2017, 15:45
by spazsinbad
DUBAI: ​Internal P5 completes second round of tests on F-35
12 Nov 2017 Leigh Giangreco

"Cubic Global Defense completed the second round of tests for its internal P5 aboard the F-35 this month, pushing the US military closer to its first encrypted combat training system, Cubic’s senior business development manager says this week.

In previous training missions, the F-35 has used a low-fidelity, unencrypted identify friend or foe system. Like its podded configuration, the internal P5 provides real-time information, records mission data and provides post-training mission debriefs. The internal P5 will update information faster than an identify friend or foe system, allowing more accurate tracking, and will encrypt messages, including position and real-time kill notifications.

The internal P5 subsystem will become operational with Block 3F, which Lockheed is on track to deliver by the end of this year, Waylan Cain tells FlightGlobal at the Dubai air show. Although Lockheed has not rolled out the full 3F software, Cubic has already started delivering the internal P5 to the F-35 fleet.

Even in a training mission, Cubic’s podded configuration would ruin the F-35’s stealth signature. The internal subsystem not only preserves the Joint Strike Fighter’s low-observable characteristics but also becomes the only encrypted training system that will be fielded on a US military aircraft. With the exception of the F-35, the rest of the Pentagon’s inventory does not have a training system that encrypts messages...."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ts-443156/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Mar 2018, 05:55
by spazsinbad
New Simulators Give Naval Aviators an Edge in Training for High-End Fight
01 Mar 2018 Megan Eckstein

"NAVAL AIR STATION FALLON, Nev. — The future of naval aviation is complex: aircraft are growing more technologically advanced, pilots face a proliferation of high-end and low-end threats, military budgets are squeezed and demand for U.S. Navy forces around the globe is growing. So how will naval aviation training keep up? In part, with increasingly sophisticated simulators.

The Naval Aviation Warfighting Development Center at NAS Fallon is undergoing a massive modernization effort to improve air warfare training, and much of the modernization revolves around the use of Live, Virtual and Constructive (LVC) training opportunities. Naval aviation and NAWDC leadership invited USNI News to tour the facilities for a day to see how technology is allowing the Navy to make its training more cost-efficient, more networked, more high-end and more beneficial to the students.... [then lots of stuff about CAVE & JTAC training but there is more....]

...Reed, the JCAS branch head, said NAWDC is still trying to get the authority to connect CAVE to the Navy’s continuous training environment (NCTE), and that while that decision has been delayed, he hoped to have it within the next 12 to 16 months. A decision to link CAVE to the rest of the trainers would help create NAWDC’s ultimate vision for this JTAC trainer: “what we will eventually be able to do is put this into a guy in a F-18 simulator or an F-35 simulator at (NAS) Oceana or Lemoore, and they’ll be running this simulator, talking to the guys in this simulator, and doing all their controls to get their currency requirements to satisfy their training” while taking their targeting cues from JTAC students in their own simulator in Fallon, Gusewelle said.

Integrated Simulator Training
A next step towards achieving that vision of connecting multiple simulators spread across the country is the Integrated Training Facility being constructed at NAS Fallon. This will house, all under one roof, simulators for “pretty much anything in the carrier strike group,” Capt. Leif Steinbaugh, director of training systems at NAWDC, told USNI News.

“We’ll be able to integrate them all together. Eventually we will be able to pipe in feeds from live aircraft out on our range – that’s the live part, the L in LVC – and then vice versa hopefully we can pipe what’s being seen in the simulators, or what’s being constructed in the simulators, out to the live aircraft as well. And then hopefully sometime in the future we’ll get that building connected to other LVC facilities, not only in the Navy, in naval aviation, but also with our joint partners,” he continued, noting that Nellis Air Force Base, about a six-hour drive to the south, would be the first targeted facility for cross-location LVC training.

In addition to the Integrated Training Facility, set to wrap up construction by the end of 2019 and open for operations within three to four years, NAWDC is also building an Air Wing Training Facility, set to finish construction in May. This building will allow the same air wing training that takes now, but at a more appropriate security level and in a way that allows for much more data collection...." [more about other stuff at the jump]

Source: https://news.usni.org/2018/03/01/new-si ... -end-fight


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 14 Mar 2018, 03:08
by spazsinbad
All the buzzwords LIVE VIRTUAL CONSTRUCTIVE, System of Systems, do I need to remember more? Capabilities Based Buy.


Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 23 Mar 2018, 04:10
by spazsinbad
AFM is attempting CHANGE so beware - their little scheme does not work using Internet Explorer 11 but works in EDGE:

https://adobeindd.com/view/publications ... r_NEW1.pdf (23.5Mb)

The four page extract attached about VIRTUAL TRAINING from AirForce Magazine Special Edition 2018 AWS is now below:

THRIVING AND SURVIVING THROUGH TRAINING Amy McCullough [and getting past the B/S at the AFM website]
USAF’S TRAINING COMMUNITY VIEWS ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND VIRTUAL REALITY AS KEYS TO AN AFFORDABLE, LETHAL FORCE.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 25 Mar 2018, 21:55
by spazsinbad
NAN Naval Aviation News gets LVC but just jets other than F-35 family mentioned with DMRT PORTABLE Trainers for F-18s.
The Future of Flight Training is Virtual
21 Mar 2018 Jeff Newman

Graphic: "illustration by Fred Flerlage" http://navalaviationnews.navylive.dodli ... nd_art.jpg

Source: http://navalaviationnews.navylive.dodli ... s-virtual/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 09 Jun 2018, 01:19
by spazsinbad
Four Page PDF attached below with entire article from NAN Naval Aviation News Spring 2018 edition.
New Atlantic Test Ranges Facility Expands Flight Test Capacity
Spring 2018 Bob Kaper; NAN

"A new, high-security operations center at the Atlantic Test Ranges (ATR) at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Maryland, is set to pave the way for further expansion of the Navy’s flight testing and live, virtual and constructive (LVC) training capabilities....

...Among the new programs expected to conduct flight tests from the operations center are the MQ-25A Stingray unmanned carrier aircraft, the CH-53K King Stallion heavy-lift helicopter, the Next Generation Jammer on the EA-18G Growler, and the conformal fuel tank upgrades for the F/A-18 Super Hornet....

...“The people in PES have access to a great deal of data that is not available to a pilot in the aircraft,” Vargo said. “We
provide the tools to allow test engineers to use that data to monitor critical parameters and respond to unexpected
anomalies. This can increase flight test efficiency and reduce the need for follow-on flights based on post-flight discovery.”

Each mission test cell will hold around 35 engineers. Two of the cells are separated by a partition that can be drawn back to make one large room that will support major exercises and fleet experiments—a new capability at ATR, Eversole said.

One test cell will be dedicated to the MQ-25A, the next generation unmanned carrier aircraft. “As the integrated test
team begins work on the future of Naval Aviation, we will support them here at ATR,” Eversole said. “We can provide
specific shielding against electromagnetic interference and put their aircraft control team close at hand during testing.”

Formally titled the P-155 Military Construction Atlantic Test Ranges Modernization Project,..."

Source: http://navalaviationnews.navylive.dodli ... ng2018.pdf (9.1Mb)

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 16 Jun 2018, 15:56
by spazsinbad
Two page PDF attached with complete article below.
Turning the benefit of virtual threats into a combat reality
19-25 Jun 2018 CRAIG HOYLE

"Creating synthetic enemies is now essential to training on fifth-generation fighter aircraft

Northrop Grumman is relishing the opportunities arising from complex training requirements associated with advanced combat aircraft such as the Lockheed Martin F-35, and believes that the use of live, virtual and constructive (LVC) technologies will increase markedly as their operation becomes more widespread.

With limited range space constraining the military’s ability to fully test the capabilities offered by advanced and widely networked fighters, augmenting live assets through the use of simulators and virtual entities is a growing trend....

...“A lot of people think that LVC is a future technology for the next generation of aircrew, but we are delivering capability right now,” Horler [NG air business development manager for the UK and Europe] says. “I believe there will be a growing emphasis on synthetic training and that live/synthetic blend.” This will become even more relevant, he says, since using future networked cyber and space capabilities in live training could give away key information or tactics to potential foes."

Source: Flight International 19-25 Jun 2018

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2018, 03:33
by spazsinbad
USAF GROKS Virtual Training but some unGROK for whatever reason - SHIRLEY USAF knows what quality they produce. :doh:
Air Force cuts pilot training by 5 weeks
30 Jun 2018 Sig Christenson

"The Air Force has cut as much as five weeks from the time required to teach novice pilots to earn their wings, a move that will help it replace rapidly departing veteran aviators...."

Source: https://www.expressnews.com/news/local/ ... 040570.php

By the By only graphics can be reproduced - WhY? Becuz I ain't gonna subscribe being in the Great South Land and all y'all.
"T-38 instructor pilot Josh Thomson uses a computer flight simulator at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph. Thomson is assigned to the 560th Flying Training Squadron, the Chargin' Cheetahs" https://s.hdnux.com/photos/74/22/72/158 ... 20x920.jpg

"T-38 instructor pilot Josh Thomson flies on a computer flight simulator at Randolph Air Force Base on Thursday, June 28, 2018. Thomson is assigned to the 560th Flying Training Squadron, the Chargin' Cheetahs" https://s.hdnux.com/photos/74/22/72/158 ... 4x1024.jpg

USAF has slashed UTP to 49 weeks and some instructors are concern
02 Jun 2018 ALERT5

"It now takes the U.S. Air Force an average of 49.2 weeks to train a pilot under the undergraduate pilot training syllabus. Previously, it was 54.7 weeks.

The service was able to acheive this by making students fly simulators early in the syllabus and more flight time on the T-38 and T-1.

However, some instructors are worried that the new system is risky as the training syllabus has been altered radically.
Instructors pointed out that students who do well in simulators might not perform as well in the actual cockpit – which is loud, hot and sweaty...."

Source: http://alert5.com/2018/07/02/usaf-has-s ... e-concern/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2018, 04:40
by popcorn
I'm not getting this... Students are getting 'more flight time on the T-38 and T-1' so what's the problem?

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2018, 05:04
by spazsinbad
Without access to all the text in the main article perhaps this quote - out of context - will make more sense - in context?
"...However, some instructors are worried that the new system is risky as the training syllabus has been altered radically. Instructors pointed out that students who do well in simulators might not perform as well in the actual cockpit – which is loud, hot and sweaty...."

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2018, 06:32
by marauder2048

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 02 Jul 2018, 06:45
by spazsinbad
GOOD STUFF! Thanks for this... :applause:

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 20 Nov 2018, 21:12
by spazsinbad
Cubic begins equipping 500 more F-35s with integrated air combat training system
20 Nov 2018 Gareth Jennings

"Cubic has awarded the first contract related to equipping a second batch of 500 Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft with its P5 Combat Training System (P5CTS).

Global Defense has contracted Leonardo to integrate the internal subsystems of its integrated air combat training system aboard 500 JSFs, bringing to 1,000 the number of aircraft fitted. Under the contract, announced on 19 November, the P5CTS internal subsystems will be delivered to Cubic over the next four years as part of Lockheed Martin's F-35 production lots 12-14.

The US military currently uses the P5CTS as its programme of record instructional aid, giving it a real-time breakdown of the scenarios being run and the missions being flown through the live monitoring and recorded mission data of air-to-air, air-to-ground, and surface-to-air training scenarios for real-time training and post-mission analysis.

While current fourth-generation aircraft carry an external pod, the airborne sub-system for the F-35 is internalised and integral to the aircraft to maintain the platform's stealth characteristics (all F-35 customers except Israel, which has its own system, will use this)…."

Source: https://www.janes.com/article/84704/cub ... ing-system

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 04 Jan 2019, 02:08
by spazsinbad
Services Declare Breakthrough in LVC Training
02 Jan 2019 Stew Magnuson

"ORLANDO, Fla. — Air Force and Navy officials are declaring success for a joint technology demonstration that tied jet fighters in the air with pilots operating simulators on the ground, who could all fly against computer-generated adversaries. A final report on the Secure LVC (live-virtual-constructive) Advanced Training Environment (SLATE) demonstration was due at the end of December, but organizers a month earlier said that the exercise went better than expected.

“We’re not supposed to say that it was a very successful technology demonstration — that’s supposed to come from our senior leaders — but it was a very successful technology demonstration,” said Wink Bennett, SLATE research lead at the Air Force Research Laboratory. “It was beyond our wildest hopes,” he added.

A team lead by the Air Force’s 711th Human Performance Wing of the Airman Systems Directorate, Warfighter Readiness Research Division took more than four years to set up the exercise. The demonstration then took place over an eight-month period at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. This was created out of “unobtanium.” It had never been done before, said David Noah, AFRL’s program lead for the demonstration.

To make live-virtual-constructive training a reality, the team had to develop several key technologies.

One was the fifth-generation advanced training waveform (5G-ATW) developed by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory to serve as the datalink. In addition to the new waveform, the training system was served by Link-16 and UHF/VHF voice communications.

The second hurdle was ensuring that all three links were cyber secure and encrypted. The aircraft also carried a SLATE pod that contained the necessary software and allowed for “untethered” operations.

“Tethered” training used the 5G-ATW to connect to a ground station, where pilots could operate simulators and take part in the exercise virtually. That also allowed for more robust scenarios with an almost unlimited number of enemy aircraft or surface-to-air missile sites. [BEST TO READ IT ALL because 'tethered' / 'untethered' (lost in space) explained]…

...“There is an incredible capability that we demonstrated in untethered ops during SLATE,” Noah said. A pilot could start out operating as an F-15 Eagle, then switch over to be part of the red team and fly as a member of an enemy formation: “You can change it literally on the fly: it was gorgeous.”

The exercise used F-15s, F-16s and Navy F/A-18s. Next will be creating links for fifth-generation fighters such as the F-22 and F-35. That will be challenging, but doable, the organizers said.

“That is yet to be solved, and it is a horse of a different color, but we have a plan to go fix that,” Bennett said.

The underlying technology is platform agnostic, Noah said. It could work on other types of aircraft, ships or space systems."

JPG: Photo: Air Force http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... AAF7E005D7

Source: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/ ... c-training

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2019, 22:32
by spazsinbad
More on JSE Joint Simulation Environment:
Joint Simulation Environment inches closer to reality
24 Jan 2018 Giancarlo Casem, 412th Test Wing Public Affairs

"EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AFNS) -- The 412th Electronic Warfare Group is one step closer to bringing the Joint Simulation Environment to life at Edwards Air Force Base. The 412th EWG recently began work to pave the way for ultimately building a new facility to house the JSE. JSE is a scalable, expandable, high fidelity government-owned, non-proprietary modeling and simulation environment to conduct testing on fifth-plus generation aircraft and systems accreditable for test as a supplement to open-air testing.

The 72,139 square foot JSE facility planned for Edwards AFB is actually one of two, the other will be constructed at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. As part of the construction efforts, the 412th EWG is also looking to hire more than 100 new personnel between both facilities -- primarily engineers with software skillsets.

The Edwards AFB facility will focus on developmental testing while the 50,967 square foot Nellis AFB facility will focus on operational testing. However, both facilities will be built with similar hardware and software configurations so both buildings will be able to augment each other’s capabilities, said Humberto Blanco, JSE project manager. The JSE facility is also being designed with that flexibility in mind.

While construction for the JSE is still months away, the 412th EWG is already ensuring that when it comes online, “growing pains” will be as minimal as possible.

“One of the things we realized was that in order for our people to become trained and get familiar with the system, its capabilities and participate in the development; it required us to develop an in-house instantiation of what’s happening at Pax River (Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland) as well as at SIMAF (U.S. Air Force Simulation and Analysis Facility),” said Blanco. “Those two facilities have limited JSE capabilities, so we advocated for, and received funding to instantiate those capabilities here.”

Construction crews are reconfiguring simulator and computer systems inside building 1020 at Edwards AFB, to make room for a small-scale JSE system that 412th EWG engineers can utilize to ensure all systems are operational and internal issues are rectified before the actual JSE facility is finished. Having a small-scale instantiation of the larger facility also allows 412th EWG customers to concurrently utilize the facilities without service interruptions, Blanco said.

“It will allow us to bring JSE simulators online and begin to experiment and to learn,” Blanco said.

The reconfiguring inside building 1020 will afford software engineers the time to be familiar with the incoming systems, which will benefit customers, said Gerald Lockwood, Modeling and Simulation flight chief.

“The coders have to really touch and see how to integrate these systems. We’re building products for it so we can develop, compile, test and get feedback on issues,” Lockwood said. “There’s so many components. It’s going to be a large battlespace in an interactive environment.”

The overall goal of the JSE is to allow the testers and engineers the capability to test multiple platforms during the developmental and operational testing phases of a platform.

“We’ve been asked to develop a high-fidelity modeling and simulation environment for initially the F-35 (Lightning II) and F-22 (Raptor) that will allow us to test aircraft in ways that we’re currently unable to test,” Blanco said. “So the environment will encompass things like weather, terrain, multiple other platforms and air and ground threats.”

“The JSE is one of my favorite projects because in terms of initial pay off, it’s just a few short years down the road,” said Brig. Gen. Christopher Azzano, Air Force Test Center commander. “We’re going to use the F-35 as the threshold platform to help prove the concept, but the long term potential of JSE is huge when you consider you can integrate virtual and constructive elements with live and open-air capability in a way that creates an environment that we can no longer build or replicate strictly with open-air resources.” [LVC LIVE VIRTUAL CONSTRUCTIVE]

Azzano said that he foresees the JSE becoming a step in the testing and developing of Air Force platforms in the future and that, in just a short time, AFTC customers will see its value.

“It’s really exciting because we can replicate the environment that our systems and warfighters might see in a dense threat environment somewhere around the globe. And we can replicate that for verification and validation that goes along with test and evaluation, and we can do it for training too,” Azzano said. “I really think we’re just barely scratching the surface on the pay off and the potential of JSE, and with the right vision I think we’ll get there, it’s going to take some time and a lot of investment, but it is a hugely important program.”

While the groundbreaking for both facilities is not scheduled until May 2020, Blanco said that when the buildings do come online, his team will be ready.

“Instead of waiting until the buildings are finished, we are developing these lab integrations here, so when the buildings are finished, we can hit the ground running,” Blanco said. “It’s very exciting times for the Air Force and the modeling and simulations community. I tell people on the outside that this is going to be the best video game ever.”"

Graphic: "An artist's rendering showcases the planned 72,139 square foot Joint Simulation Environment facility. JSE is a scalable, expandable high-fidelity, government-owned, non-proprietary modeling and simulation environment to conduct testing on fifth generation aircraft and systems accreditable for test as supplement to open-air testing. (U.S. Air Force graphic illustration courtesy of 412th Electronic Warfare Group)" https://media.defense.gov/2019/Jan/15/2 ... 3-1002.JPG (150Kb)


Source: https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display ... o-reality/

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 24 Jan 2019, 23:40
by popcorn
Incredible achievement, Kudos to all involved. Should save a ton of gas and wear and tear in the process.

Re: Live Virtual Constructive technology to revolutionize AC

Unread postPosted: 06 Dec 2019, 07:53
by spazsinbad
MORe ON SLATE. I'll assume the F-35 version will integrate inside the airframe and not have to use 'a pod' for gorsake.
Cubic seeks 2020 contract to integrate the F-35 with a cutting-edge training tool
04 Dec 2019 Valerie Insinna

"...The Air Force Research Laboratory aimed to create a technology suite that would allow the service to blend simulators and virtual elements with live training under the Secure Live, Virtual and Constructive Advanced Training Environment (SLATE) program.

In August and September 2018, the Air Force and Navy validated that it could take an F/A-18 Super Hornet and F-15E Strike Eagle outfitted with that gear and run complex flight training scenarios where, for instance, an F-15E pilot flying with a wingman in a simulator could face off against live and virtual adversaries that emit the threat information of Chinese fighter jets or integrated air defenses.

“Over the course of three weeks [in August and September 2018], we flew multiple days, multiple exercises. We flew almost 100 sorties in support of the demonstration,” said Mike Knowles, the head of Cubic Global Defense, AFRL’s industry partner on the program. Knowles spoke with Defense News during the at the Interservice/Industry, Training, Simulation and Education Conference.

Now that SLATE’s technology demonstration phase has ended, the services are identifying their next steps, and Cubic is hoping for more work.

“Air Combat Command and the F-35 Joint program office are working to fund our division’s proposed look at SLATE capabilities integration with the F-35,” Dave Noah, Maj. Thomas Adams and Maj. Jason Lingle, who work in AFRL’s Continuous Learning and Program Assessment division, wrote in the lab’s fall 2019 magazine.

The Navy, meanwhile, is interested in holding additional demonstrations with the SLATE technology at Naval Air Station Fallon in Nevada, Knowles said. “We’ll see some experiments with the Navy take place this summer and into the fall," he said. "A fifth-gen study on the application of LVC for the F-35, I suspect we’ll see that start this [coming] year also.” [more about SLATE]…

...The SLATE’s 5GATW waveform and security architecture were formulated with fifth-generation aircraft in mind, so the F-35 can use the SLATE pod without needing additional data safeguards. The challenge is integrating the technology with the F-35’s more advanced sensor fusion system, Knowles said.

“On the F-15 and F/A-18 — fourth-generation [jets] — Boeing helped in working the integration between the SLATE pod and the sensor fusion in the aircraft,” he said. “The F-35, given its capabilities are significantly more than a fourth-generation aircraft, the sensor fusion is significantly more complex...."

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/digital-sho ... ning-tool/