Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2011, 03:57
by spazsinbad
F-35 stealth fighter jet undergoes ejector seat trials 6 April 2011

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/ ... rials.html

"The UK's next generation fighter jet, the F-35 Lightning II, has undergone tests on its ejector seat.

The plane, which is set to replace the iconic Harrier, reached speeds of up to 600mph during tests at Samlesbury, Lancashire.

The system has been declared safe and will now be fitted to over 3000 aircrafts ordered by Armed Forces around the globe.

More than 30 ejection seat tests were completed in the UK, France and the USA.

The Royal Air Force website describes the jet as, "a stealthy, multi-role, all-weather, day & night, fighter/attack air system aircraft that can operate from land bases and the next generation of aircraft carriers."

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2011, 04:08
by spazsinbad
Martin-Baker Aircraft Mk 16 ejection seat escape system

"Martin-Baker's latest mk.16 ejection seat - video of selected testing shots."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1dtYGTyX8k

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2011, 04:17
by spazsinbad
Rocket sled tests prove F-35's ejector seat 06 April 2011

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepe ... 35s-e.html

"Lockheed Martin's F-35 Lightning single-seat fighter jet is having a difficult birth, with its development program dogged by budget overruns and power and software failures. Some parts of the program are in excellent health, however: in a series of spectacular rocket sled tests, military boffins at Martin Baker and BAE Systems have proven the worth of the nascent combat plane's pilot escape technologies.

BAE chief engineer Chris Garside says the sled included a full scale mockup of the F35's cockpit, which in addition to the rocket-assisted ejector seat also included an "emergency transparency removal and structural severance system" made by Pacific Scientific Energetic Materials, which uses a small, controlled explosive to fracture and remove the canopy clear of the soon-to-be-ejecting pilot.

The sled powered the F-35 'mockpit' along at a cool 966 kilometres per hour (600 mph) on a track at a Martin Baker test site at Chalgrove Airfield near Oxford, UK. It proved that just three seconds after pulling the armed 'eject' handle, a pilot would be safely strap-hanging from a parachute well clear of the doomed plane. In 30 such test runs in the UK, France and the US, the system is said to have passed all its tests...."

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepe ... 20seat.jpg

Image

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2011, 04:29
by spazsinbad
safe escape cleared for the F-35 Aircraft SAME VIDEO as first POST only WIDE ANGLE!
Video will be in your IE cache as "baes_f35_rail_video_flv[1].flv" at 2.3Mb

http://www.baesystems.com/AboutUs/Asafe ... /index.htm

"BAE Systems has led a fully integrated industry effort to deliver a production standard escape system for the F-35 Lightning II aircraft.
The system has been certified as safe for flight after a series of rigorous tests. The escape system, used in emergency situations, ensures pilots can eject safely and will be fitted to all 3000+ F-35 aircraft to be operated by Armed Forces across the globe.

The system has been tested to its limits as a full scale front section of the aircraft, complete with ejection seat and mannequin was launched at speeds in excess of 600 mph down a test track putting the escape system through its paces. More than 30 ejection seat tests were completed in the UK, France and the USA.

Ejecting from an aircraft like F-35 typically takes no more than three seconds from the time the ejection handle is pulled to the pilot being on a parachute. Everything happens very quickly and during the tests up to 900,000 measurements are recorded every second.

Once the full scale testing was complete the system was tested to further extremes of acceleration, temperature and pressure before it could be certified as safe to fly. Achieving this was a critical milestone for both the programme and team involved.

About the Escape System Industry team

BAE Systems is a prime sub contractor to Lockheed Martin on the F-35 programme and led the industry teams' development of the Escape System. Martin Baker Aircraft Company are responsible for producing the US16E ejection seat, a derivative of the highly successful Mk 16 family of seats, providing a common solution to all three F-35 aircraft variants . Pacific Scientific Energetic Materials Company provides the transparency removal system which cuts the canopy for the seat to exit and Honeywell provide vital Life Support systems for the pilot."

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 07 Apr 2011, 19:53
by spazsinbad
First Video on Utube now (now also widescreen): [1.3Mb .FLV in IE cache]

Amazing video of ejector seat in action on BAE's new F-35 fighter jet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBL-kSCr ... r_embedded

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 01:44
by FlightDreamz
This was covered on <a href="http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/defense/index.jsp?plckController=Blog&plckBlogPage=BlogViewPost&newspaperUserId=27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3a27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3afb8f90ae-ffd7-47b5-8bf1-947c38d34eda&plckScript=blogScript&plckElementId=blogDest">AviationWeek.co</a>m as well. Quote from AviationWeek,"BAE Systems Tech Manager RickWhittakar say's "ejecting from an aircraft like an F-35 typically takes no more than three seconds from the time the ejection handle is pulled to the pilot being on a parachute."
Nice to see some good press for the F-35. Would like to see some close-ups and/or slow motion capture of the canopy being detonated during the ejection (or are they ejecting through the canopy?) - but I guess you can't have everything. :shrug:

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 01:46
by FlightDreamz
Sorry double post! :doh:

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 02:18
by spazsinbad
Probably most modern ejection seats have similar time frame - however the MB US16E JSF seat has special features [N.B. AirBag Around HELMET]. http://www.martin-baker.com/products/Ej ... --JSF.aspx

Anyhoo here is the sequence from a Skyhawk A4G NATOPS (2-4 seconds to full chute depending on airspeed).

F-35 special features:
http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... c.Full.jpg

Image

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 03:50
by spazsinbad

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 03:58
by munny
Is the pilot's head meant to snap forward like that? If not, could the helmet be a bit front-heavy?

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 04:05
by spazsinbad
There is an airbag that will keep helmet/head upright. All ejection seats prior to this F-35 innovation (due to weight / size of HMDS etc.) had this 'problem'. I'll post a graphic illustration from a dramatic A4G deck height successful ejection when arrestor wire broke during a normal arrest on HMAS Melbourne. Otherwise this link has more info about F-35: (same item on another thread about F-35 seat): http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-14524.html

Bang Seat Battle Posted by Bill Sweetman at 9/16/2010

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... d=blogDest

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 04:21
by spazsinbad
F-35 JSF – The Great Escape November 13th, 2007

http://www.defencetalk.com/f-35-jsf-the ... ape-13463/

"Dubai: BAE Systems has completed Design Verification Testing for the crew escape system for the Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) variant of the F-35 Lighting II.

This series of tests has provided important risk reduction on the escape system to make sure F-35 pilots can eject safely and is an important milestone in the path to first flight of the first STOVL aircraft in Spring 2008.

BAE Systems F-35 Lightning II Crew Escape IPT leader John Thornton said: “We had some significant technical challenges to overcome in the design of the escape system, including providing enhanced neck-load protection during ejection. This is required because the F-35’s state of the art helmet is heavier and has a bigger frontal area to accommodate the visor mounted display. In addition, we also have the challenge of designing a system that can accommodate various sizes of pilot. The F-35 ejection seat is already a design classic. It is the most sophisticated and capable seat in the Western world – and it’s still in development.”

Manufactured by Martin Baker Aircraft Co, the ejection seat is an important part of the overall crew escape system and the new F-35 series ejection seat is a benchmark in design and technology...."

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 05:09
by spazsinbad
FlightDreamz asked about the canopy.... During the tests (or the ones seen on this thread) the canopy was not fitted. However...

Emergency Egress Systems

http://www.mcselph.com/eesys.htm

Saving lives with controlled explosive is paramount at PSEMC. Our Emergency Transparency Removal and Structural Severance Systems can be installed as original equipment or as a retrofit with weight, cost and performance advantages. PSEMC has over 35 years experience in emergency pilot egress from fixed wing and rotary aircraft. Canopy Fracturing/Severance Systems instantaneously remove the canopy transparency and opens a clear path allowing immediate safe aircrew egress. Structural Severance Systems using flexible linear shaped charge severs the aircraft structure and allows separation of a aircrew module for safe escape form a disabled aircraft. Egress systems include aircraft platforms such as the, F-111, B-1B, Space Shuttle/747 Carrier, C-17, AH-1, AH-64, JAS-39, T-6, F-35, T-38 and many others."

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 06:09
by handyman
WOW some really excellent video and pics.

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 10:23
by spazsinbad
CF-18 Lethbridge Crash 2010: + Zoom to Head Down Postion:

http://www.polls.newsvine.com/_vine/ima ... 739045.jpg

Image

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Apr 2011, 20:40
by spazsinbad
VIDEO: Yes, the F-35 ejection seat works By Stephen Trimble on April 8, 2011

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... on-se.html
&
SAME VIDEO: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aIz5z9VoLJU [Best Qual is 0.65Mb in IE Cache]
[TEXT:"Uploaded by BAESystemsplc on Apr 4, 2011
F35 Ejector seat trials
BAE Systems has led a fully integrated industry effort to deliver a production standard escape system for the F-35 Lightning II aircraft. The F-35 escape system is used in emergency situations ensuring pilots can eject safely. It will be fitted to all 3000+ F-35 aircraft to be operated by Armed Forces across the globe.

The system has been tested to its limits as a full scale front section of the aircraft, complete with ejection seat and mannequin was launched at speeds in excess of 600 mph down a test track putting the escape system through its paces. More than 30 ejection seat tests were completed in the UK, France and the USA."]

"...We are sure that this sled test of the F-35 ejection seat shows the system has made progress since malfunctions derailed flight tests temporarily in late 2008. Monthly assessment reports by the Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) revealed the ejection seat problems:

"As of 12 Dec 08, aircraft testing has been impacted as a result of engine and ejection seat anomalies. Seat anomalies were observed in the ejection sequence during an escape system sled test on 20 Nov 08, with two successive failures occurring during subsequent qualification testing. An investigation revealed that the ejection seat sequencer failed to function properly and the ejection seat operated in back-up mode. Data indicates a communications fault during sequencer power-up -- bench testing has shown that the sequencer is fully functional following the communications fault."

BAE Systems now says the system has completed tests of the ejection seat in full-scale mock-up of the nose section at 600mph."

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2011, 08:41
by spazsinbad
FlightDreamz asked about ejecting through canopy? I guess we see the detonating cord at rear of canopy in this photo via SpudmanWP on this thread: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... rt-30.html

http://i619.photobucket.com/albums/tt27 ... b642fc.jpg

Image

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2011, 16:43
by FlightDreamz
Thanks Spaz I can see the det cord on the canopy now, I didn't notice at first that the test sled didn't have the canopy just the ejection seat mechanism (blame that on not paying attention)! I was just under the impression the canopy would be part of the testing at some point - as it's not being jettisoned like most combat aircraft (due to F-35B STOVL requirements I believe).
Just chalk it up to one of my "fly by posts" where I typed out a post before I really thought it though! :doh:
Lot's of good photos and info though so thanks for that. :thumb:

RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2011, 17:19
by SpudmanWP
Here is a good shot of the canopy. Notice that the det cord (for lack of a better term) is in a straight line rather than a zig-zag pattern as seen in previous fighters. Open the picture in another frame for a much larger shot.

Image

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2011, 17:32
by VarkVet
One of the slides shows the cord fired.
Pretty neat.


http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... tudies.pdf

Unread postPosted: 10 Apr 2011, 19:55
by spazsinbad
:cheers: Thanks for the extra info VV & SWP.

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2011, 00:45
by FlightDreamz
Info much appreciated Spaz and VarkVet! I've seen photos where it shows what looks like the det cord in the canopy above and slightly behind(?) the pilot but I've yet to be able to find that pic either on my hard drive or on the 'net. The search continues....

Unread postPosted: 12 Apr 2011, 01:00
by SpudmanWP
The grey lines in the photo above are the det cord. Check out the pdf above and it shots after-shots of the det cord test and the exact det cord layout.

Unread postPosted: 20 Apr 2011, 03:57
by SpudmanWP
I found a good shot of the X-35 showing it's more conventional zig-zag det cord pattern.

Image

Unread postPosted: 20 Apr 2011, 04:37
by spazsinbad
2 graphics from the PDF noted above: http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... tudies.pdf

Unread postPosted: 23 Apr 2011, 12:44
by FlightDreamz
Nice shot Spud thanks for sharing that!

Unread postPosted: 24 Apr 2011, 09:10
by spazsinbad

Unread postPosted: 24 Apr 2011, 09:33
by spazsinbad

Unread postPosted: 21 Jun 2011, 10:35
by spazsinbad
Wham Fan Thank You Maam: (det cord arrangement etc.) from new F-35 website: http://www.f35.com/

http://wpc.3c08.edgecastcdn.net/003C08/ ... ing-02.jpg

Image

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 16:23
by JanHas
I noticed in the picture that the seat has a different top. Will this updated seat be used in the future?
Image

Re: RE: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 17:33
by luke_sandoz
spazsinbad wrote:CF-18 Lethbridge Crash 2010: + Zoom to Head Down Postion:

http://www.polls.newsvine.com/_vine/ima ... 739045.jpg

Image


Putting that picture into perspective . . .

http://photoblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/20 ... et-crashes

He had maybe another .25 seconds before it would have been too late.

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 19:57
by spazsinbad

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 20:09
by spazsinbad
First Martin-Baker deliveries for JSF Partner Nations

http://www.martin-baker.co.uk/news---ev ... eases.aspx

"Martin-Baker has completed the first production configuration US16E Ejection Seat for their F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft for the partner nations. The US16E is the only ejection Seat in the world that has demonstrated compliance to the entire range of accommodation, physiological and ejection performance requirements for the JSF programme.

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the first JSF partner nation scheduled to receive a production configuration Lockheed Martin (LM) F-35 Lightning II aircraft; the first UK aircraft is known as BK-1.

To mark this occasion, Wg Cdr Willy Hackett RAF and Lt Cdr Uves Wood RN from the Joint Combat Aircraft (JCA) Integrated Product Team (IPT) at Abbeywood, visited Denham on the 24th May 2011. They are pictured below with James Martin, Joint Managing Director of Martin-Baker.

Wg Cdr Hackett explained “Next year RAF and RN pilots will begin flying our first 2 JSF aircraft at Eglin Air Force Base in the US in a pooled arrangement with the USMC, as part of the preparations to build a UK Test and Evaluation Squadron, which will allow UK participation in JSF Operational Test at Edwards Air Force Base. This will be key to ensuring the UK fully understands how this 5th Generation aircraft performs and operates so that we can eventually use F-35 at a time and place of our choosing. For a pilot flying a complex combat aircraft their Ejection Seat is, in the end, critical to their ability to safely exit a stricken aircraft and return home to their families. Martin-Baker, with decades of experience and a proven track record of saving over 7350 lives has been chosen on a best value basis, as the sole supplier of ejection seats for the JSF programme, ensuring that our pilots can fly with confidence knowing that in extremis they are in safe hands.”

The Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) is the second JSF partner nation scheduled to receive the production configuration F-35 Lightning II aircraft; the first RNLAF aircraft is known as AN-1 and will also be operated at Eglin AFB. To mark the completion of the AN-1 Ejection Seat, Lt Col Jan Van Tilburg, the Military Air & Deputy Defence Attaché for the Netherlands visited Denham on 8th June 2011 and was joined by Jon Rambeau, LM VP International Programs and Peter Livingstone Managing Director of LM UK.

With the completion of BK-1 and AN-1 Seat deliveries, Martin-Baker will have completed the manufacture of all Low Rate of Initial Production (LRIP) Lot III Seat deliveries for delivery into LM Fort Worth."

http://www.martin-baker.co.uk/getfile/b ... JSF-1.aspx

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 20:14
by spazsinbad
Successful tests on F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft confirm Airborne Systems expertise in ejection seat parachute systems 06 July 2011

http://www.qimtek.co.uk/news/successful ... -2408.html

"Llangeinor, South Wales, UK - Airborne Systems, Llangeinor, Bridgend, a world leader in the design, development and manufacture of military parachute and aerial delivery systems, continues to demonstrate its expertise in the development of exceptional ejection seat parachute systems, with the recent completion of the final tests for the US16E Ejection Seat system of the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) combat aircraft.

The Martin Baker US16E Ejection Seat contains several parachutes designed by Airborne Systems Europe at Llangeinor which have been certified for flight release after a series of rigorous parachute and ejection tests conducted by Martin-Baker. Martin-Baker has worked with Airborne Systems companies for more than 60 years from the advent of the first autonomous ejection system developed in 1951.

The escape system ensures aircrew can eject safely in an emergency situation however extreme and will be fitted to all 3000-plus F-35 aircraft which will be flown by armed forces across the globe.

Dr. Adrian Jones, Airborne Systems Europe Technical Director, explained: ”The ejection seat is initially stabilised after ejection by a reefed conical ribbon drogue parachute. The inflation characteristics of this drogue parachute allow the reduction of the effect of the deceleration on the seat and pilot. After separation from the seat, the pilot is saved by Airborne Systems Aeroconical® Type 6000 main parachute. The Aeroconical® parachutes are the most technically advanced parachute in the world as they enable safe recovery in the most extreme conditions.

Jones continued: “The Type 6000 main parachute is packed into a parachute container which is ballistically deployed from the seat. The parachute container is also equipped with an Airborne Systems auxiliary parachute which controls its flight trajectory in order to prevent potentially the striking of the pilot or its main parachute by the container itself.”

The US16E Ejection Seat is qualified from 0 knots at 0 altitude (stationary aircraft on ground) to 600 knots at 50 000ft (15 240m), with the widest possible pilot nude weight range (103lbs to 245lbs – 46kgs to 111kgs).

The system has been tested to its limits from a full scale front section of the aircraft, complete with ejection seat and mannequin at launch speeds in excess of 600 mph down the Martin-Baker test track. More than 30 ejection seat tests have been completed with the production configuration in the UK, France and in the US.

Chris Rowe, Managing Director for Airborne Systems commented: “Airborne Systems ejection seats parachutes systems are already fitment to all Martin Baker ejection seat as used in fighter aircraft such as the Typhoon, Euro Fighter and we are delighted that our engineering expertise here in Llangeinor is once more being recognised and will continue to save pilots’ lives in all emergency situations and around the world.”

http://www.qimtek.co.uk/NewsStoryImages ... 0small.JPG

Image

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 20:28
by spazsinbad
Latest Martin-Baker F-35 Seat US16E details PDF (0.8Mb): http://www.martin-baker.co.uk/getdoc/6e ... -2011.aspx

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 21:15
by spazsinbad
New JSF ejection seat designed for a perfect fit By: Andrew Healey Farnborough Air Show >> July 2006

http://www.ainonline.com/airshow-conven ... Bmode%5D=1

"It’s not only movie theater seats that are now designed with the fuller figure in mind. Martin-Baker (Hall 4 Stand D4) says its system development and demonstration (SDD) ejection seat, most recently selected by Lockheed Martin for its F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, contains features designed to accommodate larger aircrew.

The UK firm’s marketing manager, Richard Staines, said the SDD seat, known within the JSF community as the US16E, “provides an unprecedented balance of performance parameters, such as safe terrain clearance and physiological loading limits, pilot boarding mass and anthropomorphic accommodation ranges.”

The seat weighs less than 180 pounds and provides 30g of crash protection. Yet it is designed to fit a broader range of aircrew statures, ranging from smaller women to larger men–all in full flight gear. A seat-tilt capability of nearly six degrees about an attachment point on the cockpit floor ensures that it meets the full range of these physique criteria.

Actuator encoder feedback to the aircraft databus is provided to allow automatic adjustment, helmet-mounted display information and zone restriction. This ensures that pilots cannot put themselves in a potentially unsafe position by transgressing, for example, the forward ejection clearance line or their proximity to the canopy.

An auto-eject system has been introduced to counter the lift-fan failure condition for the F-35B STOVL (short takeoff vertical landing) aircraft.

SSD is a development of the Mk16 product line that has been successfully integrated in the Raytheon Texan II (JPATS), Eurofighter Typhoon, the NASA T-38N upgrade program and other aircraft platforms. “From an ejection standpoint, SDD has introduced challenging requirements from cost and technical performance perspectives,” explained Staines. “Some nine years away from full-rate production, the production seat price has already been fixed. The seat, like all other aircraft components, feeds into the aircraft cost model and will be meticulously tracked.” [Nothing relevant after this.]

Unread postPosted: 08 Jul 2011, 21:52
by spazsinbad
Synopsis of Lecture to RAeS Loughborough Branch on 08 Mar 2011
Martin-Baker: the JSF story so far by Steve Roberts, JSG IPT Lead, Martin-Baker
Aircraft Company Ltd


http://homepage.ntlworld.com/john.oller ... 20seat.pdf

"...The seat incorporates a parachute and drogue located behind the pilot’s head. It also incorporates a life support system, an integrated harness together with arm and leg restraints. It has five separate operating modes which are a function of aircraft height and speed. The rate of descent is lower than for any previous ejection seat being less than 7 m/s even for the largest male pilot.

The US Navy required the ejection seat to be modular in construction such that it could be removed from/fitted to an aircraft on a sub-assembly basis. This necessitated a re-design of the parachute container to allow the seat harness to be removed without the need to unpack the parachute.

Martin-Baker ran a US/UK competition for the supply of the Personnel Location Beacon. The competition was won by H R Smith in the UK. The Beacon provides a signal which can be picked up by low earth orbiting satellites. This in turn allows a pilot who has ditched into the sea to be located anywhere in the world within two minutes.

http://www.hr-smith.com/hr-smith-news/i ... tor-beacon

The pilot’s helmet incorporates a Virtual Head-Up Display which provides him with an image of the scene around the aircraft. This image is derived from a variety of day camera and infra-red cameras located on the aircraft fusalage. It was essential for the Display to be plugged into the aircraft avionics data bus and for the plug to be extremely reliable. The ejection seat incorporates a plug which meets all the reliability criteria and is suitable for data rates up to 1.6 GBaud.

Neck protection is provided by means of a “Catcher’s Mitt” inflatable device which supports both sides of the pilot’s helmet and also provides support to the top and /back of the helmet. This device is also held in a container located behind the pilot’s head. The device is vented before the parachute is deployed. The device has been tested and proved to inflate under simulated 50,000 ft altitude conditions.

The F-35-B (STOVL) aircraft has additional failure modes associated with Lift Fan, Vane Box, Lift Fan Drive Shaft, Roll Duct and Turbine failures. A typical pilot takes two seconds to react to the ejection klaxon or one second if warned in advance of a likely failure. In the case of a STOVL related failure, ejection must take place within 0.6 seconds. Hence it was necessary to install smart failure sensors on the aircraft to automatically fire the ejection circuit mounted in the back of the seat....
________________________

New Small Personal Locator Beacon 27 September 2010

http://www.hr-smith.com/hr-smith-news/i ... tor-beacon

"UK based Techtest has developed yet another variant in its long established line of 406MHz Personal Locator Beacons. This series of products makes full use of the Cospas Sarsat search and rescue satellite system to minimise the detection and location time in an emergency.

Techtest pioneered the early integration of a GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver into portable emergency beacons to provide levels of position accuracy previously only associated with installed aviation emergency transmitters. In particular, the Series 500-27 personal locator beacon with GPS has demonstrated its effectiveness not only in real emergencies, but also during many trials which include tests under extreme climatic conditions in Antarctica during RAF Expedition Southern Reach, and live ejection seat testing by Martin-Baker for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program.

The 500-32 Series of PLB's offers similar features but in a more compact case. Smaller in all dimensions with a 35% reduction in volume over the 500-27-07 PLB whilst providing the same performance. The use of state-of-the-art battery technology and optimised electronics has enabled Techtest to produce a truly revolutionary package, providing a small beacon that can still operate for 48 hours at -20°C."

http://www.hr-smith.com/images/stories/cospas.jpg

Image

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2011, 11:41
by spazsinbad
This 'parachute container' device graphic seems to be not easily accessible. I'll post a graphic soon: [There are other threads on this forum with more info.] One Example: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... eat#182687

http://www.martin-baker.co.uk/getattach ... size=nomax

Unread postPosted: 09 Jul 2011, 13:33
by JanHas
Looking at the July 2011 gif the parachute container of future F-35 will be more like a pyramid shape. Thanks!

Unread postPosted: 10 Jul 2011, 04:49
by spazsinbad
More Like this? Photo is on an earlier thread indicated above... http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... c.Full.jpg

Image

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 09:19
by spazsinbad
F-35 Lightning II Ejection Seat VIDEO

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=joDImvnGdYc

"Published on May 29, 2012 by martinbakeraircraft"

SloMo excerpt is one / eighth of original video speed above. Start the video, right click on it to select ZOOM / FULL Screen.

http://www.martin-baker.com/_images/con ... /f35-2.jpg

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 11:02
by spazsinbad

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 12:39
by count_to_10
The ejector seat goes through the canopy instead of having the canopy blown off first?

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 12:45
by spazsinbad
Is that a question or statement. Did you look at the supporting information.
_______________

Page 1 of this thread: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... r-asc.html

Rocket sled tests prove F-35's ejector seat 06 April 2011

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepe ... 35s-e.html

"...an "emergency transparency removal and structural severance system" made by Pacific Scientific Energetic Materials, which uses a small, controlled explosive to fracture and remove the canopy clear of the soon-to-be-ejecting pilot...."
&
Emergency Egress Systems

http://www.mcselph.com/eesys.htm

"Saving lives with controlled explosive is paramount at PSEMC. Our Emergency Transparency Removal and Structural Severance Systems can be installed as original equipment or as a retrofit with weight, cost and performance advantages. PSEMC has over 35 years experience in emergency pilot egress from fixed wing and rotary aircraft. Canopy Fracturing/Severance Systems instantaneously remove the canopy transparency and opens a clear path allowing immediate safe aircrew egress. Structural Severance Systems using flexible linear shaped charge severs the aircraft structure and allows separation of a aircrew module for safe escape form a disabled aircraft. Egress systems include aircraft platforms such as the, F-111, B-1B, Space Shuttle/747 Carrier, C-17, AH-1, AH-64, JAS-39, T-6, F-35, T-38 and many others."
___________

http://www.flightglobal.com/blogs/the-d ... tudies.pdf

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 15:00
by count_to_10
I just remember reading something recently that modern canopies were too sturdy to eject through.

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 15:15
by spazsinbad
What do you think now.

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 17:31
by marksengineer
The manufacturing process to get two thicknesses in a one piece windshield-canopy has to be interesting. Thought they were vacuumed formed but as posted they say this one is stretched as well.

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 19:18
by Lightndattic
count_to_10 wrote:I just remember reading something recently that modern canopies were too sturdy to eject through.


Thats why there's a det cord on the transparency to break it before the seat goes through.

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 19:23
by lamoey
There were talk of two different seats, one for the CTOL with lower requirements and the top model for the other two. Did they manage to agree on one model in the end?

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 20:47
by spazsinbad
Thread about ACES 5 alternate seat here:

AF Looking for Savings in F-35 - change seat

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopic-t-16239.html

Decision made at beginning of this year AFAIK NOT to pursue alternate seat.
________________

I'll look for more info but here is one article cited about nogo for ACES for F-35 now:

http://www.csir.co.za/dpss/Alert/23Jan12.html

Uncommanded Egress

"Goodrich's five-year campaign to get its ACES 5 ejection seat onto the F -35A is likely to meet the same fate as General Electric/Rolls-Royce's push to keep an alternate engine in the Joint Strike Fighter program - failure. Last month, the engine manufacturer finally gave up on its years-long at- tempts to keep the F136 engine alive after consistent and stiff opposition from Pentagon leadership. A driving force behind the failure of both the seat and engine campaigns is unwillingness by the Pentagon to introduce additional elements into the program."

Butler, A. 2012. Uncommanded Egress. Aviation Week and Space Technology. 02 January 2012. pp 49-50
_______________

Another summary of same article above by a different source:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/162779270? ... =177396124

"A driving force behind the failure of both the seat and engine campaigns by Goodrich to get its ACES 5 ejection seat onto the F-35A is unwillingness by the Pentagon to introduce additional elements into the program. Though Goodrich spent about $8 million designing the F-35 seat through verification testing and risk-reduction work after sensing a perceived need for an alternative to the US-16E seat, missing out on the F-35 is(sic) [does] not necessarily end Goodrich's position as the only U.S. provider of egress system."

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 21:19
by spazsinbad
As stated in many sources all the F-35s have the same ejection seat however the B model has an automatic ejection function. The PDF about the seat is one source for this info and of course there are other sources scattered in this forum. Here is onesuch:

Test Flying The Joint Strike Fighter by Graham Tomlinson 17 June 2011

http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/hawkerassoci ... ghter.html

"...In the unlikely event of the lift fan failing catastrophically the aircraft would pitch inverted in 0.6 seconds, and the pilot is protected by auto-ejection signalled by pitch rate and attitude (derived from the YAK 38 & 141 systems)...."
__________________

QUOTES from page 3 of this thread from separate articles:

http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... rt-30.html

"...An auto-eject system has been introduced to counter the lift-fan failure condition for the F-35B STOVL (short takeoff vertical landing) aircraft...."
&
"...The F-35-B (STOVL) aircraft has additional failure modes associated with Lift Fan, Vane Box, Lift Fan Drive Shaft, Roll Duct and Turbine failures. A typical pilot takes two seconds to react to the ejection klaxon or one second if warned in advance of a likely failure. In the case of a STOVL related failure, ejection must take place within 0.6 seconds. Hence it was necessary to install smart failure sensors on the aircraft to automatically fire the ejection circuit mounted in the back of the seat...."

Unread postPosted: 03 Sep 2012, 21:29
by spazsinbad
Ejection Seat Parachute Issue Grounds F-35A Test Aircraft By Amy Butler 30 Jan 2012

http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.asp ... 419346.xml

"...Goodrich, the only remaining U.S. ejection seat manufacturer, is in the final throes of attempting to unseat Martin-Baker on the F-35A, which is likely to be purchased by at least 11 countries, with the U.S. Air Force potentially buying as many as 1,763. Without a major program like the F-35, the company’s opportunities to get the Aces 5, the latest in its Aces family of seats, into a new service platform are grim in the near future. The next major opportunity would be the Air Force’s T-38C replacement program, which has yet to formally be kicked off.

Booz Allen Hamilton studied whether the USAF Air Combat Command’s (ACC) use of the Aces 5 seat for its F-35As would save money over the life of the fighter for the service, due to commonality with the Aces 2 seats already in its fleet. “That exhaustive analysis led us to conclude that, while there are potential savings associated with the Goodrich Aces 5 seat, the amount is not sufficiently compelling to warrant the risk and up-front cost of integrating a new ejection seat into the F-35 weapon system at this time,” says Capt. Jennifer Ferrau, an ACC spokeswoman. “ACC and the Air Force strongly support the Joint Program Office’s commitment to pursue efficiencies in order to secure greater value for all JSF stakeholders.”..."

There might be more on the second page of this online article by AvWeak won't let me see it. And I don't care - enough already.

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 00:20
by archeman
Perhaps someone closer to the program can answer this question:
Since the Failure Mode Ejection for the B acts without human intervention there exists the possibility that it can false negative and be fooled by some combination of events when in hover mode (for example a faulty sensor in the Fan in combination with a short downdraft that triggers the Failure Mode to believe that the aircraft has left controlled flight when it hasn't). Does the aircraft have any additional Auto-Land feature that will continue to attempt to recover control of the aircraft after the pilot has been sent away and try to bring it down as best as possible (clearly this amounts to shiite over water)?
At least in the case of a false negative, you may save both the pilot and the aircraft.
By my figuring, you may as well try to let the flight control computer attempt to land it - after all, you have nothing at all to lose once the pilot has departed.
Requires more code I suppose but hey - at 100M each or so you may as well add the 2-3K lines of code.

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 00:35
by spazsinbad
Apparently there are dial in modes of sensitivity selectable by pilot for auto eject. This info is somewhere on this forum. I'll find it later. Why would not different situations be taken into account already by such an auto-eject mechanism. These aircraft are wired for all kinds of data collection - not just for testing.
______________

One example of the scuttlebutt about the 'auto eject' feature: I'll search interdribble for more positive 'dialup news'.... This entry from this forum: http://www.f-16.net/index.php?name=PNph ... ial#178041

http://www.airwarriors.com/forum/showth ... 14&page=34

"A group of Harrier guys were picking the brains of a group of JSF engineers are few years ago when they were socializing the lift fan design. What happens when the clutch fails, we asked? They assured us that it was designed to be fail-proof. Since complexity tends to be the natural enemy of reliability we again asked - so, really, what happens when it fails? They again insisted it couldn't fail. We just gave them the stink eye for a minute and then one of them piped up with - "Well there is an auto-eject mode on the seat that is only triggered in the event of lift fan or clutch failure". Seems that if the lift fan were to fail or the clutch were to give out, the subsequent pitch rate would be impossible to beat with a manual ejection. So in that scenario, HAL takes care of business for you. At least that was the selling point, no idea if that design feature is still incorporated."

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 01:26
by popcorn
If an,ejection ever took place over hostile territory, an auto-landing F-35 would not be a good idea. :D

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 01:28
by spazsinbad
Apparently a problem for some US UAVs over Iran by all accounts.

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 02:49
by archeman
popcorn wrote:If an,ejection ever took place over hostile territory, an auto-landing F-35 would not be a good idea. :D


Well it's possible that you would be in hover mode over enemy territory but I can't imagine why since that would kill the whole Stealth thing. Lots of issues with that scenario.

Unread postPosted: 04 Sep 2012, 03:10
by spazsinbad
Aircraft Systems - Third Edition by Ian Moir & Allan Seabridge

http://aeroden.files.wordpress.com/2011 ... _pep__.pdf (10.7Mb)

page 313
8.9 Computer-Controlled Seats
"...The seat used in the Joint Strike Fighter F-35 is the US-16E which is common
to all F-35 variants. The seat is modular and contains the following major
assemblies:

• A seat bucket within which is located the survival aids container, a backrest
and under-seat rocket motor

• A twin tube catapult with integral canopy penetrators; on the catapult is
located an energy absorbing head pad, a drogue parachute, and inertial
retraction device and a third-generation COTS electronic sequencer

• Side-mounted guide rails

• Fully integrated Life Support & Helmet Mounted Display equipment

The seat incorporates an auto eject function for the F-35 STOVL aircraft to be
used in the event of lift fan failure. The auto ejection system utilises a signal
from the FCS to initiate ejection.
..."

Unread postPosted: 25 Jan 2013, 23:53
by spazsinbad
Edited one/eighth SloMo Video Clip made from an 11Mb original available here: [look below for the head cushion [edited jpg] as seen from the side - posted earler on previous page of this thread: http://sitelife.aviationweek.com/ver1.0 ... c.Full.jpg ]

http://www.baesystems.com/video/BAES_02 ... 6471436000

From time code looks like the video was taken 13? May 2009.

F-35 VIDEO 4 - F-35 ESCAPE (When video playing right click on it to select ZOOM then FULL SCREEN)

http://www.baesystems.com/cs/groups/pub ... dition.mp4 (11Mb)

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 01 Jul 2014, 18:25
by spazsinbad
VIDEO: How Martin-Baker rises above the rest
01 Jul 2014 Craig Hoyle

"...All eyes will be on the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter as the type makes its first high-profile appearances at the Royal International Air Tattoo and Farnborough air show. As with the programme’s other two variants, its pilot’s last line of defence is the US16E ejection seat.

M-B in mid-June delivered its 150th seat for the F-35, from a projected programme total of more than 3,000 aircraft.

Developed and tested over the course of more than a decade with the involvement of 43 UK companies as suppliers, the US16E has posed multiple technological challenges, with an ejection speed requirement of 0-600kt.

The single design must accommodate the full US pilot weight range, from an unclothed 46.7-113kg (103-250lb), plus personal equipment. This requires three different seat tilt positions and a vertical adjustment function of up to 7.5in.

With F-35 pilots to use a helmet-mounted display to receive their primary flight information, the seat manufacturer has also been required to create a system which is capable of protecting an ejectee’s neck when exiting the aircraft. The solution involves a trio of airbags, activated behind and to either side of the neck.

The US16E also uses a “fifth-generation” four-point harness design already supplied for the NATO Flying Training in Canada programme’s Hawks, plus passive arm and leg restraints. An MWARS [Martin-Baker water-activated release system] automatic activation function was also mandated, to prevent a pilot from drowning if unconscious when landing in water. A new electronics unit contained within the harness release mechanism must detect a set level of salinity before activation.

“We are now looking to deploy that into many other platforms,” says engineering director Robert Martin, with interest having already come from Germany, Singapore and Taiwan.

“We’re at the limit of how fast you can put a person on a parachute,” he says. As a result, the US16E contains an in-seat sequencer – a computer which measures factors such as ejection speed and altitude, and optimises the escape by making physical loads as small as possible.

Martin-Baker’s introduction of such advances stems from its internal research and development spending. “We always invest in R&D, and try to be three or four years ahead of the game,” says James Martin. This represents a commitment worth around £10 million ($17 million) per year by the family-owned company...."

Source http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articl ... st-400877/

Martin-Baker ejection seats
Jul 1, 2014

"Almost 70 years ago, a pioneering British company performed the first test of an innovation which was to transform the cockpit of the jet fighter, and has since saved the lives of thousands of pilots."


Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 28 Nov 2014, 04:47
by spazsinbad
Another 'hang on' - jettison the CTOL/CV F-35 JSF moment - from Martin-Baker.

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2015, 05:57
by spazsinbad
Best to read it all at the jump for the rival ne'er do wells...
Martin Baker Cries Foul Over Rival Seat Improvements
12 Feb 2015 Chris Pocock AINonline

"Ejection seat maker Martin Baker (MB) has complained that its American rival is trying to unfairly win government funding for development of a new seat. The British-owned company alleges that safety and maintainability modifications of the in-service ACES II seat, made by UTC Aerospace Systems, effectively create a new product. There is a proposal for the modifications to be funded by the Pentagon; Martin Baker maintains that the seat should be government-funded only after a competitive bid process.

The two companies enjoy a duopoly of provision to the U.S. military, but Martin Baker is better positioned for the future because its Mk16E seat was selected for the Lockheed Martin F-35....

...MB claims that the Mk16E is the only seat that meets the latest USAF needs, including the safety provisions for the ejection of a pilot wearing helmet-mounted displays. The death of a USAF pilot who ejected on an ACES II seat from an F-16 in 2013 while wearing the Joint Helmet-Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) and night-vision goggles was attributed to head and neck trauma. Further, MB noted, its Mk16 seat is a modular design that can be removed from a cockpit in pieces. The ACES II is not modular, and removing the top of the B-2 cockpit when the crew ejection seats require maintenance is an expensive and time-consuming process, according to MB...."

https://www.ainonline.com/sites/default ... d_test.jpg

Source: https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news ... provements

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2015, 06:53
by popcorn
Shouldn't UTC fund development of ACES 5 in-house? This has been a growing trend in the defense industry as government purse strings have tightened. Who dares, wins! :devil:

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2015, 16:46
by archeman
popcorn wrote:Shouldn't UTC fund development of ACES 5 in-house? This has been a growing trend in the defense industry as government purse strings have tightened. Who dares, wins! :devil:


The USAF retains the 'rights' to the ACES ejection seat.
I do not know exactly what that means in terms of legal boundaries.
The USAF does have the right to extend service, maintenance and replacement part contracts to whomever they choose.
I will SPECULATE that it also seems to imply that the current manufacturer has no right to sell the product to anyone other than the USAF without their express consent. That would probably be true for the seats current form and any modification or upgrade as well.

The neck injury cited by MB in the article above likely generated new requirements from the USAF regarding the design.

So is it a New Design or an Modification?

ACES manufacturer Parent Company United Technology says it's clearly a Modification:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/brand-connect/wp/enterprise/four-ways-upgraded-ejection-seat-modifications-can-keep-our-pilots-safe/

It could also be claimed that the Modification (if that is what it is) is required due to no fault in the current ACES seat design, but a change to the environment by the USAF by equipping it's pilots with heavier helmet add-ons:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lorenthompson/2014/05/21/congressional-panel-warns-aging-ejection-seats-could-kill-pilots/

NOTE: The article above was written by UT mouthpiece - Loren Thompson

It is probably hair splitting to determine if it is New Design or a Modification, but since MB likely has a significant legal retainer staff that wasn't as busy as they could be..... Why not send them to work throwing sand into the gearbox of that project?

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 28 Feb 2015, 17:53
by spazsinbad
Thanks - interesting WashPost article/advertisement: "Sponsor Generated Content By United Technologies Published on November 10, 2014" honest at least. And a good video here: PASSIVE HEAD RESTRAINT shown in 2nd Screen Grab: "...The ACES 5 addresses this issue by providing passive head and neck protection (PHNP) that acts like a catcher’s mitt, cushioning and supporting the head and neck to avoid the “slam back” from the high speed wind streams associated with the ejection...."

Graphic from: Engineering the Space Age A Rocket Scientist Remembers; Robert V. Brulle, Lieutenant Colonel, USAF, Retired - Jul 2008: http://aupress.maxwell.af.mil/Books/Brulle/Brulle.pdf (4.6Mb)

Third Screen Grab from video below looks to me as though it is an HMDS?

UTC BCVideo FINAL2 Fullres https://vimeo.com/111160195

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2015, 03:05
by popcorn
@archeman,

The USG owning the rights would add a new wrinkle indeed. The AF should look after it's best interests and pursuing a safer seat is prudent. Fine with UTC of course.

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2015, 07:19
by spazsinbad

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 01 Mar 2015, 10:56
by spazsinbad
Original ACES 5 seat design info:

Design and Analysis of the ACES 5 Ejection Seat 2008 International ANSYS Conference

http://www.ansys.com/staticassets/ANSYS ... n-seat.pdf (5Mb)

& some ACES 5 (original) mumbo-jumbo from 2003 - worth a look for some stats:

http://www.safeeurope.co.uk/media/1036/ ... odrich.pdf (0.5Mb)

Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 03 Apr 2015, 10:42
by spazsinbad
Looks to be some MK16 US16E F-35/JSF seat ejection tests in this MB Video. Also: http://www.bremont.com/images/made/asse ... 332_95.jpg


Re: Video F-35 Ejection Hi Speed Test

Unread postPosted: 11 Nov 2015, 08:40
by spazsinbad
More on ACES FIVE push by UTC Aerospace Systems waiting in the wings for Martin-Baker to fail with the F-35 seat.
ACES 5 Ejection Seat Offers A Safe Escape
09 Nov 2015 Chris Pocock

"...“The ACES 5 is the most stable seat in the world,” Patch claimed. It features faster deployment of the drogue parachute to reduce yaw, and a new GR7000 main recovery parachute that reduces the rate of descent and oscillation. Patch said this was significant, because 43 percent of ejection-related injuries occur during the landing phase.

The seat also features an active pitch stabilization system–the rocket is gyro-stabilized–to compensate for the pitch changes caused by the varying weights of pilots, and by aerodynamic effects.

Restraining fast jet pilots during an ejection has become a major concern in recent years. The introduction of helmet-mounted sights and night vision goggles, with their added mass, has increased the risk of head and neck injuries. The death of an F-16 pilot who ejected from an F-16 on an ACES 2 seat in 2013 was attributed to this cause.

The F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) has temporarily grounded lighter-weight pilots from flying the Lightning II because of the potential for injury in a low-speed ejection. The F-35 is fitted with the US16E ejection seat from rival maker Martin Baker. The British company designed a trio of airbags that inflate in a two-stage process, as a head and neck restraint system. JPO chief Lt. General Chris Bogdan told Congress last month that three “fixes” are being pursued: a lighter helmet, a slight delay in the parachute opening, and additional head support...." [then info on the ACES 5 Seat itself]

...UTAS claims that the CKU-5 catapult rocket provides the softest ride available, with a spinal injury rate of only 1 percent...."

Source: https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news ... afe-escape