EMALS for X-Mas & F-35C

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spazsinbad

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Unread post27 Dec 2010, 23:06

CGI STEAM Catapult F-35C shot in this LM Promo Video: Lockheed Martin F-35C Joint Strike Fighter

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhzyQEF4 ... r_embedded

"Produced for the July 28, 2009 roll-out ceremony for the first F-35C carrier variant of the Joint Strike Fighter, this Lockheed Martin video includes a segment showing how the F-35C will look on the deck on a US Navy aircraft carrier when in enters servcie in 2015. The first F-35C, aircraft CF-1, is shown in the final stages of assembly and the video includes flight-test footage of the first F-35A, aircraft AA-1, & first F-35B, aircraft BF-1."
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Unread post06 Jan 2011, 03:44

Info repeated with more specific info in the thread about 'ski jumps & F-35B':
http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... t-360.html

http://www.navair.navy.mil/lakehurst/nlweb/ieeerevc.pdf (204Kb)

"Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System - EMALS
Michael R. Doyle, Douglas J. Samuel, Thomas Conway, Robert R. Klimowski
Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ 08733

Abstract: With the proliferation of electromagnetic launch systems presently being designed, built, or studied, there appears to be no limit to their application. One of the intriguing applications is electromagnetically catapulting aircraft from the deck of an aircraft carrier. The U.S. Navy had foreseen the substantial capabilities of an electromagnetic catapult in the 1940's and built a prototype. However, it was not until the recent technical advances in the areas of pulsed power, power conditioning, energy storage devices, and controls gave credence to a fieldable electromagnetic aircraft launch system. This paper presents the U.S. Navy's Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) being developed in partnership with Kaman Electromagnetics (Hudson, MA). It addresses the EMALS's present design and the technologies involved, as well as the ship and operational impacts, advantages, disadvantages, and compatibility issues for today's and tomorrow's carriers....

...One of the major advantages of electromagnetic launch is the ability to integrate into the all electric ship....
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Unread post06 Jan 2011, 04:05

Good overview of EMALS development here:

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/EMA ... ers-05220/
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Unread post06 Jan 2011, 07:35

SpudmanWP wrote:Too big and would require clearing the decks to land. How about the C-27J?


With the F-18E launch and the F-35C scheduled for EMAL at Lakehurst in 2011, I ran the numbers for the C-27J. and with 14+ ft extra wing and 1,000+ shp the "J" can carry 15000+ extra pay load. Probably needs a folding wing (lose payload?) and C-2 tail with a tailhook. But could definitely haul a crated F-135 aboard, at sea. :idea:
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Unread post12 Mar 2011, 07:42

U.S. Navy Pauses to Correct Aircraft Launch System By CHRISTOPHER P. CAVAS 9 Mar 2011

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i= ... =SEA&s=TOP

"The new Electronic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) under development for the U.S. Navy took a "pause" to correct problems that appeared after the first test launch in December, a top Navy official said March 9.

The Navy conducted its first test launch of the system using a real aircraft, rather than a test load, on Dec. 21 at its catapult testing facility in Lakehurst, N.J. But no further flights have been made since the successful launch of an F/A-18E Super Hornet.

The problem, said Sean Stackley, the Navy's top acquisition official, was a "gap" between the motors as the system worked to accelerate the aircraft to launch speed.

The EMALS consists of a number of linear motors in series, Stackley explained. "In the handoff from motor to motor, as the aircraft is accelerating, there is a gap. That needs to be tuned."

The Navy and contractor General Atomics have been working on the system's software to cure the problem, Stackley said.

"We took a pause, we're coming back with corrections, and coming back with a system functional demonstration this month," he said during a hearing of the Seapower and Projection Forces subcommittee of House Armed Services Committee.

Stackley made his remarks in response to a question by new chairman Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., about the system's progress.

The EMALS is a key element in the design and operation of the Navy's newest aircraft carrier, the Gerald R. Ford. The ship is about 20 percent complete, according to testimony presented earlier March 9 by Adm. Gary Roughead, chief of naval operations, and the system is "on schedule to support delivery" of the carrier in September 2015.

The EMALS program has suffered numerous delays during its development, however, and is reported to have nearly exhausted the margin of error to deliver components on time to shipbuilder Northrop Grumman Newport News so they can be installed on the carrier. Further EMALS delays, one source said, could begin to impact the carrier's building schedule and threaten cost increases.

Along with the associated Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) aircraft recovery system, EMALS is expected to increase the pace of launch and recovery operations on the carrier by 25 percent.

"We are carefully watching components delivered to Newport News," Stackley said. "I think the risk is acceptable, absolutely."
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