EMALS & JPALS for the JSF

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Unread post04 Jan 2020, 04:50

The carrier Ford’s new arresting gear gets a stress test
03 Jan 2020 David B. Larter

"WASHINGTON – The advanced arresting gear being installed on the Ford-class carrier simulated the high operations tempo expected during carrier operations this past October, contractor General Atomics announced Friday. At the testing site in Lakehurst, New Jersey, General Atomics arrested five F/A-18 E/F Super Hornets over two days, landing a jet every minute. “Over and over again, in rapid succession, Advanced Arresting Gear sustained an aircraft arrestment rate of nearly one per minute, successfully testing the system’s capability to handle the recovery sequence required for combat readiness,” Scott Forney, president of GA-Electromagnetic Systems, said in a release.

Arresting aircraft at a high rate over a sustained period on the same wire is an aggressive test and shows the ability of the system to withstand extreme conditions," he said. “The Ford has the capability for an even higher operational tempo than demonstrated at the test site because it has three wires and clears aircraft from the flight path more efficiently.” The system is identical to the one installed on Ford, the release said....

...In the release, Forney said the company continues to work through reliability issues and will get a good opportunity to do so when Ford gets underway in 2020. “We look forward to CVN 78 getting back out to sea in early 2020 to conduct more robust flight operations,” Forney said. “We anticipate executing significantly more sorties during this phase, utilizing both jet and prop aircraft. AAG works as intended, and we will continue to collaborate with the Navy to ensure system readiness and reliability to meet operational objectives.”"

Source: https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2020/ ... ress-test/

General Atomics Advanced Arresting Gear Completes Critical High-Cycle Testing
04 Jan 2020 Seapower Staff

"...The AAG system test program has completed more than 5,000 arrestments at the land-based test facilities at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey, and 747 arrestments aboard CVN 78 during the ship’s initial sea trials. The Navy has also issued an Aircraft Recovery Bulletin for the fleet air wing, clearing the AAG system for use on all Ford-class carriers....

...AAG is a turbo-electric system designed for controlled and reliable deceleration of aircraft. AAG is installed on board Gerald R. Ford along with the GA-EMS Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS), which uses electromagnetic technology to launch aircraft from the deck of naval aircraft carriers. In addition to CVN 78, EMALS and AAG are being delivered for the future John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) and the Enterprise (CVN 80)."

Source: https://seapowermagazine.org/general-at ... e-testing/
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Unread post31 Jan 2020, 06:35

The carrier Ford is trying to shake years of controversy and find its groove

https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2020/ ... ts-groove/

ABOARD THE CARRIER GERALD R. FORD IN THE VIRGINIA CAPES — Capt. J.J. Cummings is literally jumping up and down with excitement.

“Ahhhhhh I love that s---!” he shouts as the roar of an F/A-18 Super Hornet’s twin engines fades into the distance.

The fighter jet’s low flyby a few hundred yards off the port side of the U.S. Navy’s most expensive-ever warship is a loud reminder that the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford isn’t a construction project anymore.

For Cummings, the ship’s Massachusetts-born commanding officer, and for the ship’s crew, Ford is now a living, breathing warship with jets operating from its $13 billion flight deck. “I could watch flybys all day,” the career fighter pilot said Jan. 27 during a visit by Defense News aboard the vessel.

Standing on the deck of the first-in-class Ford, Cummings is showing off the major redesign of the flight deck, which expanded the available space to maneuver and refit fighters to get back in the air.

“This spot right here is what defines the Ford class,” he said, stopping in front of the in-deck refueling stations. “On the Nimitz class, if you want to refuel an aircraft you have to pull a hose across the flight deck and you can’t drive over it so you can’t maneuver aircraft the way you might like. “Now you just open this hatch, pull the aircraft up and hook up right here.”

The redesigned flight deck, which was developed in consultation with NASCAR pit engineers, gives the Ford an extra half acre of real estate over its predecessors. The extra space is key to the Navy’s newest platform, built from the keel up to maximize how efficiently the ship can generate sorties, as well as be adaptable to new aircraft and weapons systems over time ...

... But for all the myriad issues that come from fielding a radically different first-in-class ship, Cummings and his crew are jazzed about how it’s performing. Many of the key technologies, such as the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System and the Advanced Arresting Gear have performed remarkably well — a significant improvement over some of the bugs the ship faced when aircraft started landing on and launching from the carrier in 2017.

“I just spoke to some of the first ones to use the flight deck back in 2017 and 2018: exponential improvement in performance,” Cummings said. “For the catapult, we smoothed out many of the software issues and tolerances. We reduced those tolerances to a right number and we’ve had very few issues with the catapults.

“Our Advanced Arresting Gear is performing spectacularly. A couple hiccups here and there, a quick reset: off and running.”

Ford has been using its time at sea to develop wind envelopes for all the aircraft currently flying in the fleet. The process included generating a series of wind conditions, launching and landing an aircraft, and downloading the technical data; then rinse and repeat.

“By the time we pull in at the end of January, every fleet aircraft — C-2, E-2D, F/A-18 Super Hornet, Growler and T-45 (our jet trainer) — will be validated to be given their full envelopes for these aircraft to go on deployment or to train our young aviators,” Cummings said.

The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter will ultimately be integrated into the ship, which is a matter of reconfiguring some spaces to handle classified materials and storing parts, among other things, but the ship will not deploy with the jet at first ...

... So, after years of delays, cost overruns and controversy, the ship is finally getting into its groove. And that’s the message Cummings wants to send over the next year of operations.

“This ship is kick-ass,” Cummings said. “I came here a year and a half ago, I heard all the stories, heard from the critics, came here, and they were all wrong in their assumption about our ship. What people should know is that this ship is amazing.”


Lot more detail in the link.
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Unread post01 Feb 2020, 03:22

The Navy's top civilian official says the aircraft carrier Ford's weapons elevator 'disaster' is back 'on track'

https://www.businessinsider.com/navy-se ... &r=US&IR=T

Asked about the elevators on Wednesday at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments in Washington, DC, Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly said that issue "has obviously received the most attention, because it's been sort of a disaster up until now, to be frank, but we are getting after that problem."

"We're probably going to have seven of these elevators done by the end of this year, out of the 11. They will be certified and operating," Modly said. "They're actually operating now. There's just a certification process that has to go on on those other three."

Once the three remaining elevators are certified, Modly said, "we'll be able to have full range down to the very lowest weapons compartments that we have in the ship. Those are the ones that are fore and aft that go all the way down. So that I think is on track."

The Ford got the first of its 11 elevators in December 2018. But by October 2019, only three had been certified and turned over to the Ford's crew. As of January, four elevators have been certified and turned over.

The Navy has said it expects all 11 elevators to be certified and operating by the end of the Ford's 18-month post-delivery test and trials period, which is currently in its third month.

The new elevators are part of the first new carrier design in 40 years.

They run on electromagnetic motors rather than the cables used on older carriers. The change is meant to allow them to move faster and carry more — up to 24,000 pounds at 150 feet a minute compared to Nimitz-class carriers' 10,500 pounds at 100 feet a minute.

Seven lower-stage elevators will move ordnance between the lower levels and main deck. Three upper-stage elevators move it between the main deck and the flight deck. A utility elevator can move injured personnel, allowing the others to focus on weapons. The upper-stage and utility elevators are the ones that have been certified and turned over.

In his comments Wednesday, Modly highlighted the carrier's overall progress.

"The more important thing is how the ship operating, and they're doing extremely well right now with carrier [qualifications]," Modly said. "A lot of the material conditions stuff that was a concern to me when I went to the ship ... that's really getting exercised extremely well."

"We're hearing feedback from the pilots now that because of this decision to move the island back farther on the ships ... that was done because of the amount of space it opens up in the front of the deck," Modly added. "What they're finding also is that the airflow across the deck is much more stable and smooth, so landing on the carrier now is a completely different experience is what the pilots are telling us."


Officers on the Ford also touted the work they've been able to do as it operates in the Atlantic this month.

"What we're doing is validating years of test catapult shots that were done at the EMALS test facility ... and years of arrestments on AAG," both at a facility in Lakehurst, New Jersey, said commanding officer Capt. John J. Cummings.

Launching and landing the E-2D Hawkeye, C-2A Greyhound, EA-18G Growler, and T-45 Goshawk, done for the first time this month, were "major milestones" and the "payoff of a ton hard work by the engineering teams and by the test squadrons," said Cmdr. Mehdi Akacem, the Ford's air boss.

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Unread post02 Feb 2020, 22:55

USS Ford CVN-78 sea trials

https://youtu.be/66wfl_vdKjs

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Unread post07 Feb 2020, 15:03

Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) 2 page PDF attached
FY 2019 [Jan 2020] DOT&E

Executive Summary
• The Navy Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation Force (OPTEVFOR) conducted IOT&E Phase I for the Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) Block 0 One-Way capability from October 2017 to March 2019. This testing was conducted to support an Early Operational Capability (EOC) of JPALS for use with Fleet F-35B aircraft deployment to amphibious assault ships.

• DOT&E determined JPALS Block 0 One‑Way capability is operationally effective and suitable for the Navy’s EOC.

• DOT&E approved the Milestone C Test and Evaluation Master Plan (TEMP) in March 2019.

• OPTEVFOR conducted operational testing aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in April 2019 to support the JPALS Block 1 Two-Way capability Operational Assessment (OA). During shipboard testing, pilots completed the requisite number of JPALS auto-piloted approaches and landings, with the plan to complete the OA in FY20.

• JPALS Block 1 Two-Way capability IOT&E Phase II planning is currently in progress.

• JPALS Block 0 is an interim solution/EOC of JPALS, specifically to support the F-35B. Block 0 uses an ultrahigh frequency (UHF) One-Way datalink broadcast to transmit a subset of the JPALS precision approach data and on-deck Inertial Navigation System alignment from ship to aircraft.

• JPALS Block 1 will further support the F-35B/C and MQ-25A with an UHF Two-Way datalink broadcast capability by providing the accuracy, integrity, and continuity required for future F-35C and MQ-25A autoland capability on CVN-type ships and F-35B coupled flight capability on LH-type ships.

Mission
• Operational Commanders will use units equipped with JPALS Block 0 to achieve precision approach and landing capability for F-35B aircraft deployed to amphibious assault ships with minimal effect from conditions at point of departure or landing.

• Operational Commanders will use units equipped with JPALS Block 1 to achieve precision approach and landing capability for F-35B/C and MQ-25A for stand-alone or close-proximity air operations with CVN- and LH-type ships throughout the world....

...Activity
• OPTEVFOR completed IOT&E Phase I of JPALS Block 0 One-Way capability for F-35B/C aircraft approaches to aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships. Testing was conducted from October 2017 to March 2019 to support the Navy’s June 2018 EOC declaration.

• DOT&E approved the JPALS Milestone C TEMP in March 2019.

• OPTEVFOR conducted testing aboard USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in the Virginia Capes Operating Area in April 2019 to support the JPALS Block 1 Two-Way capability OA. Testing was executed concurrently with developmental testing as part of an integrated test.

• Pilots completed 21 approaches, 14 of which included autonomous JPALS assisted landings.

• A modified F/A-18C served as a JPALS Test Bed as no fleet aircraft currently can use the JPALS Two-Way capability for precision approaches to fully automated JPALS assisted landings. Fielding of JPALS Two-Way capability is not expected until F-35 Block 4.3 in FY24.

• JPALS Block 1 Two-Way capability IOT&E Phase II planning is currently in progress.

Source: https://assets.documentcloud.org/docume ... Report.pdf (5.1Mb)
Attachments
JPALS 2019DOTEAnnualReport pp2.pdf
(201.59 KiB) Downloaded 131 times
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Unread post07 Feb 2020, 22:26

Pilots completed 21 approaches, 14 of which included autonomous JPALS assisted landings.


A modified F/A-18C served as a JPALS Test Bed as no fleet aircraft currently can use the JPALS Two-Way capability for precision approaches to fully automated JPALS assisted landings.


Credit to the Navy for advancing this to the auto-land stage (14 accomplished)....on a single modified aircraft. I wonder what weather conditions (particularly visibility) were acceptable for the tests and what the auto-land footprint was.

In the last few years, the only advance in the civvy GBAS systems was to allow an 1800' RVR vice 1/2 mile viz with AP or HUD for the Houston Bush Rwy 9 GLS. All the others (IAH & EWR) are still 200 and 1/2 approaches, no auto-land authorized.

Even if the Navy can make this work with one pilot on one special aircraft, I still 'spect it's along way off for any wide-body with 200+ folks on board (think MAX problems), and I'd still question whether it's a done deal for the F-35 Blk umpty-ump under all weather conditions very soon. Musk may have us on Mars before this concept jells. There's an idea, why not put him on to this. :mrgreen:
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Unread post07 Feb 2020, 23:15

'outlaw162' said: "...I'd still question whether it's a done deal for the F-35 Blk umpty-ump under all weather conditions very soon...."
SIMON SAYS: "Fielding of JPALS Two-Way capability is not expected until F-35 Block 4.3 in FY24."
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 00:30

I’d be interested in understanding where the system drives a ‘B’ approach. Over-the-stern or offset approach, who controls the closure/rate of deceleration to the hover, and what interventions are the pilots allowed?
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 01:42

outlaw162 wrote:
Pilots completed 21 approaches, 14 of which included autonomous JPALS assisted landings.


A modified F/A-18C served as a JPALS Test Bed as no fleet aircraft currently can use the JPALS Two-Way capability for precision approaches to fully automated JPALS assisted landings.


Credit to the Navy for advancing this to the auto-land stage (14 accomplished)....on a single modified aircraft. I wonder what weather conditions (particularly visibility) were acceptable for the tests and what the auto-land footprint was.

In the last few years, the only advance in the civvy GBAS systems was to allow an 1800' RVR vice 1/2 mile viz with AP or HUD for the Houston Bush Rwy 9 GLS. All the others (IAH & EWR) are still 200 and 1/2 approaches, no auto-land authorized.

Even if the Navy can make this work with one pilot on one special aircraft, I still 'spect it's along way off for any wide-body with 200+ folks on board (think MAX problems), and I'd still question whether it's a done deal for the F-35 Blk umpty-ump under all weather conditions very soon. Musk may have us on Mars before this concept jells. There's an idea, why not put him on to this. :mrgreen:

With the tech, the aircrafts were hitting the same spot and excessive wear. Very early they introduced a variable error to strike a larger area.
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 01:59

I’d be interested in understanding where the system drives a ‘B’ approach.


The thing to remember is the approach profiles, whether ship-based differential or land based augmented for track accuracy, are independent of the way a particular aircraft autopilot is programmed to handle it.

Options for centerline or offset approaches are loaded and selectable in the onboard Flight Management/Mission computer. For example, you would want a particular visibility to conduct an offset approach whether be 20 meters or 50 or more, where theoretically you could conduct a centerline approach to 0/0 :shock: , really independent of aircraft type, though non-VTOLs would save some computer space by not having the abeam option loaded. There would be a specific frequency to be selected for the shipboard or land based augmentation. The augmentation system provides enhanced accuracy, not approach profile, either offset or centerline being selectable onboard the aircraft.

How the autopilot/autothrottle system handles it depends on the individual aircraft and programmed algorithms.

Naturally, I don't know how the B would optimally handle it....but I'd be pretty sure the Pilot can (gasp) disconnect the autopilot/autothrottle system at any time and actually hand fly the aircraft using displayed steering commands that offer the same basic profile and precision from the GPS augmentation....if the pilot's up to it.

"Fielding of JPALS Two-Way capability is not expected until F-35 Block 4.3 in FY24."


Thanks, missed that. I hope I'm still alive to see it, but primarily 'cause I have a long term CD maturing then. :D

With the tech, the aircrafts were hitting the same spot and excessive wear. Very early they introduced a variable error to strike a larger area.


Impressive. (How much wear do you get out of 14 landings? :mrgreen: )
Last edited by outlaw162 on 08 Feb 2020, 02:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 02:02

Sounds like a job for an actual F-35B test pilot at least to explain meanwhile this is what the Brits intend JPALS in future:
PAX PIONEERS
July 2018 Jamie Hunter

"...The aircraft cannot ‘hook up’ to the Queen Elizabeth at this point – the F-35 has the capability but the ship doesn’t yet have JPALS [the GPS-based Joint Precision Approach and Landing System]. However, some systems on the aeroplane can interpret data from the carrier, such as determining its speed. JPALS is ultimately designed to give the F-35 auto-land capability; the pilot would simply press a button and the aircraft lands...."

Source: F-35 The Fighter Revolution Special Edition Magazine July 2018

The USN can move in mysterious ways methinks but all hail to the chief for getting on the ILS bandwagon at last....
Pax airfield first to receive Navy’s newest instrument landing system
06 Feb 2020 NAVAIR

"NAVAIR AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. -- The Navy’s newest instrument landing system (ILS) is installed at NAS Patuxent River’s Trapnell Airfield, required inspections are underway, and the system is expected to be fully operational by mid-February. “ILS is becoming a program of record for the Navy because we’ve finally reached the point where more than 50% of the Navy’s fleet of aircraft are capable of using this equipment,” said Pax River’s Air Traffic Control Facility Officer Lt. Steve Palmer...."

Source: https://www.navair.navy.mil/news/Pax-ai ... 62020-1521
Last edited by spazsinbad on 08 Feb 2020, 02:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 02:14

The 'easy' button.

(I get the feeling you don't put much stock in what I say. Neither does my wife. :D )
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 02:19

Not sure what you refer to here but long ago a now dead SHAR test pilot of renown longed for the RED BUTTON to land.

Having red (YES I KNOW) the OUTLAWED explanation it seems to JELL with the 3D aspect of JPALS & said approaches.

OH I see amendments... WHILE LOOKING FOR QUOTES other peeps join in however my page is open at the last entry so any further posts are missed - my bad. I'll AMEND MY WAYS and "RESIGN MY COMMISSION" (Margaret Houlihan in MASH). Anyway here is what an LSO newsletter said long ago now. Jeepers JPALS has taken an age....
"[2012]...“JPALS slaves to the IFLOLS setting for nominal hook touchdown points for each cross deck pendant allowing the pilot to not only change glide slope, but even target a specific wire.”..." http://www.hrana.org/documents/PaddlesM ... er2012.pdf [extinct]
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 02:44

I’m just always curious about ‘how’ the pilot mech and displays will work, not so much ‘if.’ From there, I work through the what-ifs mentally from the start of the approach to the spot it stops near or above to land.

My preliminary understanding is that a fully auto approach will be available that requires but one hotas actuation that will take the jet from its current position all the way to a stabilized hover abeam or above the intended point of landing — all of it hands-off. Pretty slick stuff, particularly if one is returning to the ship in the wee, dark hours, in snotty wx after 7 or 8 hours in the cockpit.
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Unread post08 Feb 2020, 02:54

Playing catchup... 'optimist' was referring to runway damage during land testing I think but also deck wear & tear issues.

Did not the VAAC Harrier demonstrate an AUTO LANDING in 2005? albeit in good weather because it was the first time.

World's first STOVL aircraft automatic landing on HMS Invincible https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tbgF616PJk

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