EMALS & JPALS for the JSF

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spazsinbad

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Unread post03 Mar 2019, 09:39

GOOD URL: http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... s-(aug.-31).html (but it stupidly breaks so cannot copy/paste)

TINY URL it is: https://tinyurl.com/y4etclmb JPALS Guides An F/A-18A Hornet To First Automatic Landing 2000

Thanks for that 'old info' - did not have that from wayback - it will go in the new PDF about JPALS getting produced now.
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post03 Mar 2019, 10:08

Over the page 'optimist' said:
"No, it was a hands off auto landing. The accuracy was too great and was scaring a patch, so they had to introduce software that made changes to have a greater landing area. I'm now starting to wonder if I'm getting mixed up with the UAV?..."

There are no quotes with that kind of information in that 2000 article. Without a pointer to the source of your claim I can only claim that you have misremembered something or similar; when the original article is found it all may become plain.

USN aircrew will tell you that 'automatic landings' have been carried out for a LONG TIME not just with JPALS to guide them and of course no magic carpet to glide upon. The X-47B was dramatically accurate however I do not believe anyone complained about that aspect or anything else. It was superb, with the robot using a special version of JPALS (not OK for humans) to do the business. Extreme accuracy is required for carrier landings because the SIX DEGREES of FREEDOM of ship movement ENSURE that the aircraft/hook combo will NOT hit in the same spot every time BUT the aircraft MAY catch the same arrestor wire every time which means that it needs to be replaced more often but also the others stay put for longer - winsome losesome.

There is at least one thread about the early to date 'auto landings' (which could be very uncomfortable for the aircrew).

A 'short' article about 'first auto': http://thanlont.blogspot.com.au/2011/07 ... hands.html

http://www.tsretirees.org/memory/Femiano.doc [NO LONGER THERE SO TWO PDF page attached made from .DOC]

Just found this PDF on web (don't think I've seen it before but who knows eh).

F/A-18A-D Hornet Current and Future Utilization of Mode I Automatic Carrier Landings May 2007 Brian T. Schrum
https://trace.tennessee.edu/cgi/viewcon ... k_gradthes (PDF 2Mb)
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AutoCarrierLandSysACLS Femiano History PRN pp2.pdf
(84.71 KiB) Downloaded 272 times
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post03 Mar 2019, 10:40

Aeronautics and Space Report of the President
Fiscal Year 2014 Activities NASA

"...Aircraft Safety and Survivability [page 65]
The Navy recently completed a technology demonstration of the Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS). The ship-based JPALS included auto landings by F/A-18C Hornets on the deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt. JPALS is a GPS-based precision approach and landing system that will help ship-based aircraft land in all weather conditions, initially providing guidance to a decision height of 200 feet and half-nautical-mile visibility. While JPALS was originally a tri-service program with multiple increments, it has been restructured into one increment to support the F-35B and F-35C, as well as UCLASS aircraft. JPALS will allow for coupled, auto-landing functionality via two-way data link.

A dramatic reduction in pilot workload during F/A-18 carrier landings was demonstrated in flight simulations at the Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Technologies (MAGIC CARPET) project developed a combination of integrated direct lift control, flight path control augmentation, and ship-relative heads-up display, which allowed pilots to consistently conduct precision landings on the carrier with minimal pilot compensation. This capability is now planned for implementation in operational F/A-18E/F/G and F-35C aircraft. Greater ease in carrier landings will result in enhanced safety and the ability to shift valuable training resources from carrier qualification to complex mission training...."

Source: https://history.nasa.gov/presrep2014.pdf (2.4Mb)

A slice of ancient history of fortune JPALS telling which did not come to pass as noted in a previous post graphic....
USN Program Guide Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS)
2013 USN

"...[JPALS] Description
The JPALS is a joint DoD effort with the Air Force and Army. The Navy assumed the lead service role in March 2007. JPALS fulfills the need for a rapidly deployable, adverse weather, adverse terrain, day-night, survivable, DoD/civil/ internationally interoperable, and mobile Precision Approach and Landing capability that can support forward presence, crisis response, and mobility needs. Sea-based JPALS consists of a GPS/INS-based precision landing system component (Shipboard Relative GPS or SRGPS) with a two-way data-link and an independent backup system. JPALS provides critical enabling technology for several naval programs such as CVN/LH type ships, JSF, and unmanned systems (UCLASS). Sea-based JPALS will also be installed on all air-capable surface ships, carrier air wing aircraft, and DoD aircraft capable of operating from Navy ships. JPALS will replace the Automatic Carrier Landing System (ACLS) on nuclear aircraft carriers, SPN-35 on LH type amphibious ships, and various approach systems ashore, including Instrument Landing Systems (ILS), TACAN, and fixed and mobile Precision Approach Radar (PAR). JPALS land-based systems and aircraft systems will also be civil interoperable and FAA certifiable.

Status [2013]
JPALS completed MS B in June 2008, with contract award on September 15, 2008. Sea-based JPALS IOC is 2016. The system is on schedule for installation in CVN 78, the lead ship of the Gerald R. Ford new-design aircraft carrier program.

Developers
Raytheon Fullerton, California USA - Partnering developers include Rockwell Collins

Source: https://www.navy.mil/navydata/policy/se ... -npg13.pdf (9.4Mb)
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post10 Mar 2019, 07:47

113 pages of appropriate JPALS goodness in a PDF attached below - only the 2nd page 3 VIDEO URLS are LIVE - rest dead.

VIDEO .MP4 attached is just a silent view of the CVN JPALS approach simulation as viewed via F-35 HMDS apparently.

See F-35C JPALS CVN Carrier Approach Simulated HMDS View https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tJ3lHvv-v0c

Attachments

Joint Precision Approach and Landing CVN Simulation JPALS.mp4 [ 1.4 MiB | Viewed 12767 times ]

JPALS Info pp113 10mar2019 PRN.pdf
(6.07 MiB) Downloaded 452 times
JPALScvnSimViewPDFpage.jpg
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post27 Apr 2019, 20:31

26 April, 2019. The US Navy (USN) is preparing to place an order for Raytheon's Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS), to be manufactured and installed on all of its aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships.

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) on 25 March approved production of the system, which is installed on all three variants of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, and should sign a contract with the Raytheon at the beginning of May. This will launch serial production of the technology, says Raytheon and lead to JPALS being installed on 11 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and eight amphibious assault ships, with the first units expected to be delivered some time in 2020.


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... er-457458/
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Unread post27 Apr 2019, 23:01

Thanks, seems to be a well researched article. Some other interesting quotes from 'aussiebloke' URL above perhaps, YMMV.

NOW ALL THE TEXT of article is in 4 page PDF attached below.
ANALYSIS: US Navy precision landing system to enter production [I'm assuming people read all the article]
26 Apr 2019 Garrett Reim

"..."In layman’s terms, it provides a kind of a tunnel [on the heads-up display] for the airplane to fly through to get at the same landing point every time safely," says Brooks Cleveland, Raytheon's senior aviation adviser for precision landing systems.

Raytheon promises that the system is 99% reliable, guiding an aircraft to a 20x20cm (8x8in) spot on a carrier's deck in almost all weather and up to Sea State 5, an ocean surface condition where rough waves are cresting as high as 2.5m (8ft). JPALs uses an encrypted, anti-jam data link to connect to software and receiver hardware built into F-35 fighters and MQ-25A tankers, as well as an array of GPS sensors, mast-mounted antennas and shipboard equipment.

Pilots returning to a carrier for a landing will first engage with JPALS at about 200nm (370km) away, where they start receiving range and bearing information, then at 60nm the jet automatically logs into the JPALS queue, receiving more precise data while beginning two-way data-link communication. At 10nm the pilot starts receiving precision data for landing, following visual cues to land on an exact spot.

Using JPALS is more covert than relying on a legacy tactical air navigation system and radio transmissions between a pilot and air traffic control, says CJ Jaynes, Raytheon executive technical adviser for JPALS. "You do not have to have an air traffic control tower. You don't have to have anyone talking to you," she says. "A system can be on the ground and a pilot can go all the way to his landing point without any communication whatsoever."...

EXPEDITIONARY USE
In January 2019, Raytheon demonstrated a portable version of JPALS guiding in a USMC F-35B vertical take-off and landing variant for a touchdown at Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. In attendance were personnel from the USN, USMC and US Air Force (USAF), says the company.

Those services are interested in JPALS as a way to rapidly set up and facilitate air traffic control operations at expeditionary bases, which are part of a Pentagon idea to make the position of air forces unpredictable – a strategy to keep near-peer adversaries such as China or Russia on their heels should war break out. In particular, the USAF is showing strong interest, says Jaynes.

"The reason the air force is interested is they are developing a concept of operations called 'agile basing' where they intend to bring in their air wing, maybe stay in a location for 24 to 48h and then move the entire air wing to a new location," she says.

The USMC is also interested because it could play a role in the Pacific theatre, says Cleveland. "This system is perfect for that island hopping," he says....

...For a second demonstration of the expeditionary version of JPALS at NAS Patuxent River in Maryland on 8 May and 9 May, Raytheon invited back all of the US military services, plus international development partners on the Joint Strike Fighter programme. "Any country that's buying an F-35 – whether it's an A, B or C model – is a potential customer for this," says Jaynes...."

Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... er-457458/
Attachments
JPALS Precision Recovery Flight International 30 Apr 2019 pp4.pdf
(702.06 KiB) Downloaded 203 times
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post28 Apr 2019, 00:34

JPALS' data link is encrypted and jam resistant but is it detectable by non-friendly platforms that could potentially pinpoint it's source of origin?
"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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Unread post28 Apr 2019, 01:26

Nothing is perfect or have you been under the wrong impression? One has to get between the DIRECT ENCRYPTED but:
"...JPALs uses an encrypted, anti-jam data link to connect to software and receiver hardware built into F-35 fighters and MQ-25A tankers, as well as an array of GPS sensors, mast-mounted antennas and shipboard equipment.... Because the system relies on a direct encrypted data link the likelihood of interception – a risk with a broadcast, which could give away the position of the aircraft or ship – is also lower, says Brooks Cleveland [Raytheon's senior aviation adviser for precision landing systems]...."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post28 Apr 2019, 02:08

Trying to pinpoint a pencil beam is not going to be so easy. Even in this case if the pencil beam is more like a 50 foot wide swath, your detector will not have time to draw conclusion to position any faster than it could have visually seen the target firsthand.
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Unread post28 Apr 2019, 03:13

spazsinbad wrote:Nothing is perfect or have you been under the wrong impression? One has to get between the DIRECT ENCRYPTED but:
"...JPALs uses an encrypted, anti-jam data link to connect to software and receiver hardware built into F-35 fighters and MQ-25A tankers, as well as an array of GPS sensors, mast-mounted antennas and shipboard equipment.... Because the system relies on a direct encrypted data link the likelihood of interception – a risk with a broadcast, which could give away the position of the aircraft or ship – is also lower, says Brooks Cleveland [Raytheon's senior aviation adviser for precision landing systems]...."

Page 4 of this thread has a SAT / CVN / Aircraft diagram which can explain how the ship does not necessarily have to DIRECTLY BROADCAST to aircraft but can do so by Satellite. Then once in range the DIRECT ENCRYPTED KICKS IN: [also in appropriate conditions the CVN could broadcast ONLY when the aircraft is briefed then once DIRECT link - broadcast off.]

viewtopic.php?f=22&t=14115&p=238894&hilit=Suppression#p238894

http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ieee_pilot/a ... /hires.gif

Image

Then on following page 5 this thread anotherie: download/file.php?id=17478

Image

Page 6 has this goodly one: download/file.php?id=17896

Image

PREVIOUS PAGE THIS THREAD HAS THIS GRAPHIC + PDF LINK: download/file.php?id=29463

Image
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post23 May 2019, 23:33

aussiebloke wrote:
26 April, 2019. The US Navy (USN) is preparing to place an order for Raytheon's Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS), to be manufactured and installed on all of its aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships.

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) on 25 March approved production of the system, which is installed on all three variants of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, and should sign a contract with the Raytheon at the beginning of May. This will launch serial production of the technology, says Raytheon and lead to JPALS being installed on 11 nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and eight amphibious assault ships, with the first units expected to be delivered some time in 2020.


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... er-457458/

Contract awarded now...
US Navy awards Raytheon $235m for 23 JPALS units
23 May 2019 Garrett Reim

" [all of the above plus] …The first units are expected to be delivered some time in 2020, Raytheon has said. The final deliveries are expected by 2023....

...Raytheon is interested in adapting JPALS for other USN carrier-based aircraft, such as the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey and Northrop Grumman E-2 Hawkeye.

The company is also pitching the system to foreign militaries. It has said that Italy plans to buy the system for one of its aircraft carriers and the UK Royal Navy is interested in buying two systems for its two Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers."

Photo: "F-35C flight approach during sunset - Jeffrey M Sherman https://www.flightglobal.com/assets/get ... emid=77555


Source: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... ts-458438/
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F-35CsunsetRAMP.jpg
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post25 May 2019, 23:34

madrat wrote:Trying to pinpoint a pencil beam is not going to be so easy. Even in this case if the pencil beam is more like a 50 foot wide swath, your detector will not have time to draw conclusion to position any faster than it could have visually seen the target firsthand.


It doesn't use a pencil beam (which in the UHF band would require a giant antenna), Instead it uses an omni-directional antenna with an encrypted spread spectrum signal (also known as frequency hopping). Without the appropriate crypto to tune the receiver it just appears to be noise, although it is still detectable if the carrier is putting out enough power (even then it doesn't decrypt the signal, just detects it). Not nearly as detectable as TACAN or other landing systems.
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Unread post29 May 2019, 01:37

SAVE MONEY - VOTE FOR TRUMP. SPEND MONEY - VOTE FOR TRUMP. Shake head in despair - VOTE FOR STEAM TRUMP!
Experts: Navy Would Spend Billions to Answer Trump’s Call to Return Carriers to Steam Catapults
28 May 2019 Ben Werner

"President Donald Trump again called to install steam catapults on future aircraft carriers, in a move experts say would cost billions of dollars and reduce the capital ships’ capabilities.

Trump, who has been critical of the Ford-class carriers’ new electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) system, said he prefers the steam-powered catapults found on the older Nimitz-class CVNs. He again called on the Navy to revert back to the old technology while speaking to naval forces in Japan over the Memorial Day weekend.

Tuesday, while visiting sailors and Marines aboard amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD-1), Trump faulted EMALS for causing delays and cost overruns on the first-in-class USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78). “We’re spending all that money on electric, and nobody knows what it’s going to be like in bad conditions,” Trump said in his speech. “I’m going to just put out an order, we’re going to use steam.”

...retired Capt. Tal Manvel told USNI News. Manvel was part of the Ford-class design effort a decade ago. The first chance for steam catapults would be CVN-82, Manvel said, “which isn’t scheduled to begin construction until 2028.”...

...EMALS is easier than steam catapults to calibrate for different types of aircraft, which becomes essential as the Navy moves toward incorporating lighter unmanned aircraft into the air wing, Manvel said.

“EMALS works,” Manvel said. “Still has some wrinkles to smooth out, but it works well.”"

Source: https://news.usni.org/2019/05/28/expert ... -catapults
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post29 May 2019, 01:42

As usual Trump has no idea what he is talking about. Yet, according to him he knows more than the "Generals". :doh:
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Unread post19 Jun 2019, 18:42

For whatever reason this announcement is ANNOUNCED AGIN but what do I know? Extra detail 'bout testin' added below.
Raytheon Wins $234 Million U.S. Navy Contract for 23 JPALS Landing Systems
19 Jun 2019 Seapower Staff

"PARIS — Raytheon won a four-year $234 million contract from the U.S. Navy to outfit all of its nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and amphibious assault ships with 23 Joint Precision Approach and Landing Systems (JPALS), the company announced in a release.

JPALS is a GPS-based precision landing system that guides aircraft to precision landings in all weather and surface conditions. “The U.S. Navy understands how JPALS contributes to their mission success and safety of its people,” said Matt Gilligan, vice president of Raytheon’s intelligence, information and services business. “Other military services could also benefit from the system’s ability to safely land both fixed and rotary-wing aircraft in almost any low-visibility environment.”

Since 2018, U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Lightning II fighter pilots have used JPALS to guide them onto the USS Wasp amphibious assault ship during deployed operations in what Navy Capt. B. Joseph Hornbuckle III, program manager, Naval Air Traffic Management Systems Program Office, called “the most difficult conditions on Earth.”

Earlier this year, F-35B pilots participated in two demonstrations of a new expeditionary version of the JPALS system that brings the same precision capability from sea to shore. The proof-of-concept events showed how the GPS-based system could be reconfigured into a mobile version to support landings in a traditional airport setting.

Expeditionary JPALS fits in five transit cases and could be repackaged for a variety of small transit vehicles transportable by C-130. Once on the ground, the system can be fully operational in under 90 minutes."

Source: https://seapowermagazine.org/raytheon-w ... g-systems/
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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