EMALS & JPALS for the JSF

Discuss the F-35 Lightning II
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Unread post11 Sep 2015, 22:35

By 'barricade' do you refer to a conventional style USN 'barricade' or a 'fly-in' net of some kind? The robot will have to survive this 'catch' with no damage - time after time - no?
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Unread post12 Sep 2015, 01:46

However the 'sea CVF' MQ-9 lands it is likely best done robotically via JPALS as demonstrated by X-47B. Getting that done with testing etc. will be some development. Perhaps once this aspect is enabled along with CVF landing system cleared then an upgraded MQ-9 (what is wingspan? - I see it is 66 feet - how is this for CVF?) might be a consideration as per:
General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper

"... Pilots traveling with the Reaper will use the ground control station to launch and land the aircraft, while most of the flying will be done by US-based pilots.

Testbed and upgrades

In January 2012, General Atomics released a new trailing arm design for the Reaper's main landing gear; benefits include a 30%+ increase in landing weight capacity, a 12% increase in gross takeoff weight (10,500 lb vs. 11,700 lb), a maintenance-free shock absorber (eliminating the need for nitrogen pressurization), a fully rejected takeoff brake system at a gross maximum weight of 11,700 lb, and provisions for automatic takeoff and landing capability and Anti-lock Brake System (ABS) field upgrades. In April 2012, General Atomics announced possible upgrades to USAF Reapers, including two extra 100 gallons fuel pods under the wings, and new heavy-weight landing gear, to increase endurance to 37 hours. The wingspan can also be increased to 88 ft, increasing endurance to 42 hours. The USAF has bought 38 Reaper Extended Range (ER) versions, carrying external fuel tanks, the heavy-weight landing gear, a new fuel management system which ensures fuel and thermal balance among external tank, wing, and fuselage fuel sources, and an Alcohol Water Injection (AWI) system to shorten the required runway takeoff length; these features increase endurance from 27 to 33–35 hours. General Atomics internally funded the wingspan increase....

...General Atomics is also considering equipping the MQ-9 with Link 16 to allow it to pass targeting coordinates and position information to other aircraft.

During a U.S. Navy exercise in August 2014, General Atomics demonstrated its Lynx multi-mode radar's synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and maritime wide-area search (MWAS) modes on a King Air 350 surrogate for the Reaper. The Lynx showed it could support maritime operations in littoral environments by detecting mine-like-objects and small vessels like fast boats, sailboats, and fishing boats, and link the radar's data to the Navy’s Intelligence Carry-On Program (ICOP) data link system. The company's purpose for supporting the exercise was to demonstrate the Reaper's relevancy in a maritime surveillance role by delivering near-real-time, all-weather, day/night Lynx radar and EO/IR imagery.

In June 2015, a study by the USAF's Scientific Advisory Board identified several improvements for operating the Reaper in contested airspace; adding readily available sensors, weapons, and threat detection and countermeasures could increase situational awareness and enable riskier deployments. Suggestions included a radar warning receiver to know when it's being targeted, air-to-air and miniature air-to-ground weapons, manned-unmanned teaming, multi-UAV control, automatic take-offs and landings, and precision navigation and timing systems to fly in GPS-denied areas. Another idea was redesigned ground control stations with user-friendly video game-like controllers and touchscreen maps to access data without overwhelming operators.

A typical MQ-9 system consists of multiple aircraft, ground control station, communications equipment, maintenance spares, and personnel. A military crew comprises a pilot, sensor operator, and Mission Intelligence Coordinator. The aircraft is powered by a 950 hp turboprop, with a maximum speed of about 260 knots (300 miles per hour or 483 km per hour) and a cruising speed of 150-170 knots (278 to 315 km/hour). With a 66 ft (20 m) wingspan, and a maximum payload of 3,800 lb (1,700 kg), the MQ-9 can be armed with a variety of weaponry, including Hellfire missiles and 500-lb laser-guided bomb units. The Reaper has a range of 1,000 nmi (1,150 mi; 1,850 km)[wiki: dubious – discuss] and an operational altitude of 50,000 ft (15,000 m), which makes it especially useful for long-term loitering operations, both for surveillance and support of ground troops...."

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_A ... Q-9_Reaper

F-35B specs: Wingspan: 35 feet
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Unread post20 Sep 2015, 17:43

Back to JPALS for the F-35s.... and a Hankie CARUSO graphic for the old hot rod STEAM groovers - now EMALers.... :mrgreen:
2015 Strike Test News VX-23
2015 VX-23 LT Chris “TJ” Karapostoles

"...F-35C JPALS
The Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) will equip the F-35 with a precision and non-precision approach capability at the ship as well as a means of aligning the Inertial Navigation System (INS) without a cable — similar to Radio Frequency (RF) alignments in legacy aircraft.

Pilots will primarily rely on JPALS during night-time and inclement weather carrier landing operations. The PAX ITF has tested both the alignment and non-precision capability of JPALS at the field. The F-35C completed the first non-precision JPALS approaches in August. The system worked as designed, providing stable TACAN-like course guidance as well as automatic final bearing indication. The PAX ITF will test the alignments and non-precision approach capability during the F-35C’s second phase of Developmental Test (DT-II) aboard a CVN this fall."

Source: http://issuu.com/nawcad_pao/docs/striketest2015_single (PDF 3.6Mb)
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Unread post20 Sep 2015, 18:40

Another tidbit which confirms that JPALS is for the F-35B/Cs & UCLASS - for the moment - money problems I guess....
2015 STRIKE TEST NEWS
2015 VX-23 LT William “Magic Legs” Dann

"Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS)
The Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) is an all-weather precision approach guidance system designed to support both land and sea-based instrument approaches using the Global Positioning System (GPS). The system will be designed to provide approach guidance to both the F-35B/C Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and the Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) program. For the JSF, it will provide the capability to conduct coupled landings with a decision height and altitude of 200 ft and ½ nmi. This is the same capability currently provided by the radar based AN/SPN-46 Automatic Carrier Landing System (ACLS) system.

The UCLASS will need the additional capability to conduct 0 ft and 0 nmi landings on the ship as it is an unmanned platform. Fall of 2015 will see the F/A-18 and C-12 aircraft used as surrogate test platforms to test JPALS functionality for both JSF and UCLASS onboard the USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69). JPALS is not currently slated for any aircraft other than JSF or UCLASS.

Source: http://issuu.com/nawcad_pao/docs/striketest2015_single (PDF 3.6Mb)
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Unread post23 Sep 2015, 22:10

Business | Wed Sep 23, 2015 4:00pm EDT
Related: Aerospace & Defense
"U.S. Navy's F-35 test to include new helmet, full weapons load"
FORT WORTH, Texas | By Andrea Shalal

Source:
http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/09/ ... 7F20150923

The U.S. Navy's next round of carrier testing of the Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) F-35C stealth fighter jet will include new helmets and jets fully loaded with internal weapons, a company official told Reuters.

During the tests, scheduled for the first two weeks of October, two F-35s will also test the Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS), an all-weather, GPS-guided landing system being designed by Raytheon Co (RTN.N), Lockheed's F-35 program manager, Lorraine Martin, said in an interview. She spoke after a ceremony for the rollout of the first of the 52 F-35s that Norway will buy.

Martin said the second round of testing is a milestone for the jet, which has wider wings than Air Force and Marine Corps versions, holds more fuel, and is designed to be catapulted off the deck of an aircraft carrier, and then land, using a special hook and heavy arresting gear.

"We're really pleased with the momentum that we've got with the Navy," she said. "If you talk to the Navy's aviators, they know the aircraft has incredible importance for their ability to do what they need to do from the ship around the world."

Lockheed is building three models of the supersonic jet for the U.S. military and nine other countries: Britain, Australia, Norway, Italy, Turkey, the Netherlands, Israel, Japan and South Korea. Denmark and Canada are also considering orders.

The Pentagon plans to spend $391 billion to develop and produce 2,457 planes over the next few decades.

Total procurement is now slated to reach 3,150, but could rise, Martin told reporters this week.

She said the U.S. government is providing information about the aircraft to other countries, identified by sources familiar with the program as Singapore, Belgium, Switzerland, Poland, Finland and Spain.

The U.S. Marine Corps in July became the first service to declare an initial squadron of its F-35B jets ready for combat, with the Air Force due to follow suit next August.

The U.S. Navy, which carried out the first round of at-sea testing on the USS Nimitz last November, plans to have an initial squadron of jets ready for combat by late 2018 or early 2019.

Martin said the jets' performance during the first round of carrier testing had helped build confidence in the program.

This time, one Lockheed and three government pilots will be using the jet's improved Generation-3 helmet, which is already being used for testing on land. They will fly with a full store of internal weapons and full fuel tanks to test the jet's performance at higher weights. There are no plans to fire the weapons, officials said.

U.S. defense officials said the tests would also include catapult takeoffs with after-burner power, more night approaches and landings, engine runs for maintainers and other parameters aimed at creating conditions that are more similar to combat.

They said the tests would not include a portable version of the F-35's complex, computer-based logistics system, with the data required to be relayed via communications links instead.
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Unread post23 Sep 2015, 22:54

Thanks. I'll put a link to this F-35C DT-II test info here: viewtopic.php?f=57&t=28046

F-35C DT-II TESTING CVN thread in the millstone subsection which includes 'test flights'.
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Unread post30 Sep 2015, 16:57

Carrier Ford crew preps for delivery after sea trial delay
26 Sep 2015 Lance M. Bacon

"ABOARD THE FUTURE CARRIER GERALD R. FORD, NEWPORT NEWS, Va. — The decision to delay sea trials for this supercarrier was a matter of cost versus calendar, and money won out.

Shipboard tests that cover hundreds of programs are close to 50 percent complete. The beleaguered Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System was successfully tested on bow catapults in June; waist catapults will be tested in November....

...‘A whole new world’
Ford has a steep learning curve. Some procedures worked out in an engineer’s office years ago have not panned out in the real world. As they find the fix, sailors also have to learn the ins and outs of leap-ahead technologies.

“On a legacy catapult, if you have a ‘suspend,’ you know it’s going to be within a handful of things,” said Cmdr. Ed Plott, Ford’s air boss. “Everybody understands instantaneously what that is and how long it’s going to take to fix. For us, we have to work through the problem and then figure out what specific events it effects. The more that we learn about the system, the better understanding we have, the more effective we will be making those decisions.”

Plott calls his khaki leadership “the A-Team,” and said they are “legends” within the launch and recovery community. But walk through the department and it is easy to see that all ranks recognize a responsibility to gain and share institutional knowledge. In fact, many have created their own “A” Schools to bring new crew members up to speed.

Operations are much the same on the flight deck, but downstairs it is a different world. On one hand, the end of the steam era means maintenance is not as hot, dirty, or smelly, and doesn’t take as many people. That is good news for Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Launch/Recovery) 1st Class (AW) Jernelle Smith, who has managed shots and traps for 12 years.

“It is easier to manage these catapults than the legacy” ones, she said. “It takes fewer man-hours, which means people will be able to get a lot more sleep. We don’t have to stay up all night doing maintenance after being on the flight deck for 12 hours.”

But the change also brings challenges.

“With a legacy ship, we already had a path on everything we did. Here, we don’t have that,” said Chief Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (AW/SW) Christopher Boone, an 18-year vet entering his third year aboard Ford. “Below these decks, things are different. We have to think outside of the box. It is a whole new way of thinking and training, a whole new way of launching and recovering aircraft.”...

Source: http://www.navytimes.com/story/military ... /72774398/ & http://hrana.org/news/2015/09/carrier-f ... rial-dela/
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Unread post10 Dec 2015, 19:56

On page 9 of this thread: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=14115&p=288627&hilit=India+EMALS#p288627 there is info about EMALS for INDIA. Here is some more info:
Jet Engine Technology a Top Priority in India-US Talks
10 Dec 2015 Vivek Raghuvanshi

"...Another priority is cooperation on development of an electro-magnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS) for the proposed Indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vishal, the MoD source added.

India and the US are already discussing cooperation in jet engine EMALS system for the carrier under the India-US Defense Technology and Trade Initiative (DTTI), a forum set by the two countries to identify defense projects that could be taken up under joint development.

The DTTI forum officials in three of their meetings have discussed the possibility of cooperation in jet engine technology, the MoD source added.

Another joint working group under DTTI is discussing the possibility of cooperation in aircraft carrier technology and has held four rounds of meetings, the source added.

The US has already offered India an EMALS for the deck of its proposed homegrown carrier, capable of launching fifth generation fighter aircraft and airborne early warning aircraft.

Currently Indian aircraft carriers have ski jump assisted take-off systems.

India, Russia and China operate carriers using the less advanced short take-off launch system. With an EMALS-equipped launch system, India's naval strike fighters would encounter less strain on their airframes and be able to conduct sorties faster.

However, analysts are not sure if joint cooperation in high-tech projects between India and US can take off in the near future.

"It is too early to expect co-development and co-production of advanced weapons systems and the two countries will have to begin with low end weapon technologies to learn how the DTTI will work on the ground," said Nitin Mehta, a defense analyst here."

Source: http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /76979974/
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Unread post02 Apr 2016, 13:33

AAG is back in the news NAVAIR:
AAG traps Super Hornet, marks program milestone
31 Mar 2016 PEO(T) Public Affairs NavAir

"The Navy’s Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) program reaches a milestone with the first recovery of a manned aircraft, an F/A-18E Super Hornet, March 31 at the Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS) at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in N.J. The aircraft performed additional roll-ins, at speeds up to 105 knots, enabling the AAG test team to assess the system’s response and compare it with data from earlier developmental testing, which used aircraft-representative dead-load vehicles. The AAG is concurrently being installed and tested aboard the future Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) in Newport News, Va. The system provides the capability to recover a broader range of carrier-based aircraft while reducing manning and maintenance requirements. “This historic event is the next step toward validating AAG’s performance and is the direct result of the diligent efforts from a dedicated and innovative team,” said Capt. Steve Tedford, program manager of the Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment program office (PMA 251). U.S. Navy Photo"

PHOTO: http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... 0FINAL.jpg

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=6221
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Unread post05 Apr 2016, 03:53

:devil: Moron or more on - take your pic - or whatever.... AAG is getting good to go... :roll: :mrgreen:
Super Hornet Catches Wire on Advanced Arresting Gear in First Manned Aircraft Test
04 Apr 2016 Sam LaGroan

"...The facility in New Jersey had arrested simulated dead loads and jet cars ahead of the first manned arrested landing with the Super Hornet from Naval Strike Aircraft Test Squadron 23 (VX-23) on March 31, according to a General Atomics statement. “More than 1,200 successful dead load arrestments have been completed at the Jet Car Test Site in Lakehurst, New Jersey,” stated Dean Key with General Atomics said in the statement. “Now, with the arrestment of aircraft, we take an important step in verifying the dynamic controls and system performance as a whole.”

The AAG underwent an extensive redesign in 2013 that delayed the testing schedule by two years, Navy officials disclosed in 2015.

“We are about two years behind where we should be up at Lakehurst in terms of having the systems installed and testing it with real aircraft,” Rear Adm Tom Moore said last year. “I have to get equipment installed… and concurrently with that I have to get Lakehurst to start testing the upgraded system.”

In October, the Naval Air Systems Command said that after the redesign of the AAG, the service said it will only have to deal with software fixes on the Ford and no major other hardware improvements.

“We feel confident we can deliver hardware to the ship without having to go back and redesign or remove and replace anything we’ve delivered to the ship,” Rear Adm. Donald Gaddis, Program Executive Officer for Tactical Aircraft said in an October hearing.

The tests will inform a series of recovery bulletins for the aircraft that will operate on the Ford-class.

“The plan right now is to do these recovery bulletins in incremental steps,” he said. “We’ll start with the Super Hornet E/F, then we’ll go to the F-18C and then we’ll go to the E2 [Hawkeye] and C-2 [Greyhound]. And our plan is to do all those type/model/series and get all those recovery bulletins done before we hand it over to [the director of operational test and evaluation.”..." [WOTNO F-35C?]

Photo & Caption: https://i1.wp.com/news.usni.org/wp-cont ... 03/aag.jpg "An artist’s conception of an installed Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) on a U.S. carrier. General Atomics Image"


Source: https://news.usni.org/2016/04/04/super- ... craft-test
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Unread post05 Apr 2016, 18:22

[quote="spazsinbad"]:...The AAG underwent an extensive redesign in 2013 that delayed the testing schedule by two years[/b], Navy officials disclosed in 2015.....In October, the Naval Air Systems Command said that after the redesign of the AAG, the service said it will only have to deal with software fixes on the Ford and no major other hardware improvements.
...

...."extensive redesign" and "only have to deal with software fixes".....as long as it works... :)

side note: JPALS is to be integrated into the AAG to provide dynamic data linked from the landing a/c. Dynamic data includes the a/c number (ID), a/c weight, consumables (status of remaining fuel, weapons, etc.)weight, airspeed, all calculated as "hook load" and last but not least ...the eta. The above is calculated as the loads for the 3 or 4 wire (c.d.p.) AAG controls.

...eventually I hope to see the landing energy of the AAG, recovered electrically and added back into the ship power systems (EMALs??) :)
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Unread post05 Apr 2016, 21:48

Flight Crew: Aircraft Launch & Recovery Equipment Test Division: Lakehurst, N.J.
NAVAIRSYSCOM Published on Oct 1, 2015

"Sailors assigned to Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division's workforce in Lakehurst, N.J., support the fleet by developing, testing and training on aircraft launch and recovery equipment and aircraft support equipment."


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Unread post17 May 2016, 14:34

First the good news and then the less good news....
"...Though AAG testing is running behind schedule and the data set is limited, Meyer said test data on EMALS has shown the system to be more reliable than predicted."

Advanced Arresting Gear Tests Delayed But Little Operational Impact Expected
17 May 2016 Megan Eckstein

"NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. – The Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) test schedule for aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) was pushed back again, but the delay may cause little impact thanks to a slew of post-delivery test requirements for the first-in-class ship, the CVN-78 class program manager told USNI News.

Manned aircraft just began arrested landings on a ground-based AAG runway system in New Jersey on March 31, Capt. Chris Meyer said Monday at the Navy League’s Sea-Air-Space Exposition 2016, and the first manned airplanes will not be cleared to land on Ford until November....

...the rest of Ford is 98 percent complete, AAG is still being installed on the ship. The Navy intended to install the improved AAG on the ship and conduct land-based tests at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., concurrently to help buy back lost time. Though the delays with AAG continue, Meyer said it was possible that the new pushed-back schedule would have no operational impact....

...“It’s important to remember that we’re not going to start on day 1 on the ship launching and recovering fleet aircraft,” he said of the ship shakedown. Because the island on the flight deck is shaped and located differently than is the island on Nimitz-class carriers, the Navy still needs to understand how that will shape the wind patterns for flight deck operations. The very first at-sea period for the ship after its delivery will support rotary wing dynamic interface testing, Meyer said. The carrier will then conduct air traffic control certifications with its new radar systems, and will eventually bring out test squadrons to conduct the first manned launches on the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) and manned arrested landings on the ship with AAG.

Meanwhile, manned AAG testing in New Jersey will continue, with the Navy testing F/A-18E-F Super Hornets first. By November the engineers will issue an Aircraft Recovery Bulletin for the Super Hornets, allowing them to begin landing on the aircraft carrier.

“So by the time we’re ready to do fleet aircraft, all of this will have sorted itself out,” Meyer said, noting that a November start to Super Hornet flight deck operations will work fine given the rest of the post-delivery events.

The engineers in New Jersey will then test the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye and eventually the legacy F/A-18C-D Hornets.

“I’m pretty confident two of those are going to finish before shakedown is done,” Meyer told USNI News. “The very last one, F-18C-D, there’s some risk that might bump out a little bit. We’ll just have to keep watching it, but pretty close.”

Program Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers Rear Adm. Tom Moore said in October that having only one type of airplane to work with during the shakedown would be okay because “the catapults and arresting gear are agnostic to what type of planes land on them. … It doesn’t matter to me how many different type/model/series, I just need planes for launching and recovering during the six-month period between delivery and before I take it in for the post-shakedown availability.”

Still, Meyer said he hoped to receive Aircraft Recovery Bulletins for the two remaining aircraft types before the end of shakedown so as not to affect crew training.

“You want the ship to be able to train with the full air wing, so if that recovery bulletin is not done then that’s one plane in the air wing that you couldn’t train with on Day 1,” Meyer told USNI News. “But it’s a two-year (training) period, so if it’s Day 2 that’s not necessarily the worst thing.”..."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2016/05/17/advanc ... t-expected
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Unread post24 May 2016, 19:28

Navy May Back Away From Advanced Arresting Gear for Ford Carriers
24 May 2016 Sam LaGrone

"The Navy could consider using a different system to catch incoming aircraft on its next generation of Gerald R. Ford-class (CVN-78) of aircraft carriers after the costs for the General Atomics-built Advanced Arresting Gear have more than doubled, USNI News has learned.

The troubled AAG system has lagged years behind the rest of the next generation components included on the Ford-class, Navy officials have said over the last year.

In the report the Senate Armed Services Committee released with its proposed Fiscal Year 2017 defense authorization bill, the SASC laid out a pattern of cost increases from about a $476 million in costs for research development and acquisition in 2009 for four systems to a 2016 cost estimate of $1.4 billion – about a 130 percent increase when adjusted for inflation.

Based on the cost increase, the SASC bill is pushing for a top-down review of the program by the Office of the Secretary of Defense to take a second look at AAG and recertify its need for the Ford-class.

Ultimately, USNI News understands, the goal is to have the planned AAG systems on the ships that follow carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) – John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) and Enterprise (CVN-80) – replaced with a more traditional but enhanced version of the current Mk-7 MOD 3 arresting gear.

Publically the service is still committed to AAG for the Fords.... [NO LONGER PUBLIC MY FRIEND!]

...“The Advanced Arresting Gear has become a model for how not to do acquisition of needed technology,” a senior Navy official told USNI News on Tuesday. “Exactly how we move forward is still being worked out.”...

...While a Mk-7 configuration may be in play for the follow-ons to Ford, the lead ship will be outfitted with the AAG configuration, currently being installed on the carrier.

The promise of the AAG and the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) on the other end of Ford was to allow the carrier to launch and recover aircraft that weren’t built to the high tolerances of the current arrested landing and catapult systems and expand the types of aircraft that can make an arrested land on a carrier.

“Typically in our manned aircraft designs, you have to build an airplane that fits within the operating envelope of the Mk-7 arresting gear and the Mk-13 catapults. So you kind of start with an operating envelope that gets you sort of a design of aircraft like we have now – F-18 Super Hornet, Growler, Joint Strike Fighter,” Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, the Navy’s director air warfare told reporters last year.

“The aircraft are structured that way, they’re strengthened … you build weight and structure into the airplanes to accommodate the violence of the arrested landing. With the Advanced Arresting Gear and the ability to land an airplane – it’s still a controlled crash, but relatively more softly, and to launch it relatively more softly, and so a graduated kind of force as the airplane goes up – you can now start to do things with aircraft design that you couldn’t do before. It might allow us some more margin in weight, in size, and in structure and capability.”

On the other end of the flight deck, the General Atomics EMALS is performing much better in testing on Ford and at Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) test facility at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, in Lakehurst, N.J."

Source: https://news.usni.org/2016/05/24/19801
A4G Skyhawk: www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ & www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/videos?view_as=subscriber
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nutshell

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Unread post25 May 2016, 01:40

I've read that half of the power generated from the two 300MW nuclear powerplants of a Ford class carrier is used for the EMAL, is that true?

What is the point of having SO MUCH electrical power (like, 3 times or something more then a Nimitz) ? Are the Navy going to use some crazy laser gun on these carriers?
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