EMALS & JPALS for the JSF

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Unread post18 May 2015, 06:22

The 'deadloads' may be seen coloured RED in the picture at the end of the posts on previous page.
US Navy Announces Successful Test of Electromagnetic Catapult EMALS on CVN 78 Ford class
16 May 2015 NavyRecognition

"...The recent test shots, known as "no-loads" because no aircraft or other loads were attached to the launching shuttle, successfully demonstrated the integrated catapult system. Using electromagnetic technology, the system delivers substantial improvements in system maintenance, increased reliability and efficiency, higher-launch energy capacity, and more accurate end-speed control, with a smooth acceleration at both high and low speeds. By allowing linear acceleration over time, electromagnetic catapults also place less stress on the aircraft....

...During the tests, generators within the ship produced an electric pulse, which was passed through power conditioning electronics to linear motors just below the flight deck surface. This energy allowed for the linear motors to propel the launching shuttle down the catapult track in excess of 180 knots before bringing the shuttle to a stop at the end of the track.

The next phase of EMALS testing, scheduled for this summer, will involve launching "dead-loads" off of the bow of CVN 78 into the James River. "Dead-loads" are large, wheeled, steel vessels weighing up to 80,000 pounds to simulate the weight of actual aircraft. The dead-loads will be launched from each catapult using a specific test sequence to verify that the catapult and its components are operating satisfactorily...."

Source: http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.ph ... class.html

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Unread post19 May 2015, 08:07

...higher-launch energy capacity, and more accurate end-speed control, with a smooth acceleration at both high and low speeds. By allowing linear acceleration over time, electromagnetic catapults also place less stress on the aircraft....

No jerking...does this mean the issue re stressing EFTs during launch is resolved?
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Unread post19 May 2015, 08:30

AFAIK it was made clear that an update to the software controlling the launch was what was required - and probably needed to be tested. The quote below is from previous page on this thread:
Navy Jets With Extra Fuel Can’t Be Launched Off New U.S. Carrier
27 Mar 2015 Tony Capaccio BlumBug

"...Software Fix
The Navy says it will install corrective software on the launch system intended to reduce acceleration forces and will test it on board the Ford after delivery next March. The software change is intended to adjust the power exerted during launches to reduce stress on the wing tanks.

Commander Thurraya Kent, a Navy spokeswoman, said the catapult flaw didn’t cause any launches to fail during on-ground tests at the Navy’s Lakehurst, New Jersey, facility.

Navy aircraft specialists “are aware of this issue and in close coordination with structural and systems engineers” who are assessing launch system “and/or aircraft-based alternatives to address the situation,” she said.

The Navy has earmarked funds to develop corrections once a solution is determined, she said...."

Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/artic ... -s-carrier
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Unread post23 May 2015, 19:22

Former elder President Bush sending down a DEADload aboard PCU Bush some time ago now:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... _Unit_(PCU)_George_H.W._Bush_(CVN_77),_during_a_catapult_test_ceremony.jpg
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US_Navy_080125-N-2510R-002_Former_President_George_H__W__Bush_signals_the_launch_of_a_dead_load_off_the_flight_deck_of_Precommissioning_Unit_(PCU)_George_H_W__Bush_(CVN_77.jpg
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Unread post29 May 2015, 02:39

First - the good news - then the not so good but should be OK - IF... AND... would the 'cable shock absorbers' be the flat 'impact' pad - not the round sheave - as seen in the photo below from: http://www.navy.mil/management/photodb/ ... 24-057.JPG
PEO Carriers: Advanced Arresting Gear Delays Won’t Stop Ford From Delivering On Time
28 May 2015 Megan Eckstein

"The program executive officer for aircraft carriers told USNI News he is confident the carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) will deliver on time despite delays in the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) program....

...The other new system on the flight deck, the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) “is probably one of the best news stories in the program,” Moore said. The Navy finished no-load tests on Catapult 2, including 22 shots in one day, and “it worked like a champ.”

Catapult 2 is set for dead-load testing next month, which involves catapulting large, wheeled, steel vessels weighing up to 80,000 pounds off the front of the ship to simulate the weight of an actual aircraft.

Catapult 1 will follow shortly behind, with no-load testing next week. Construction on Catapults 3 and 4 will wrap up soon so testing can begin shortly afterwards, Moore said....

...Rear Adm. Tom Moore said Thursday that the AAG setbacks created about four to six weeks of schedule pressure to the ship, but he is striving to make up that time. Moore said in March that the General Atomics-built component had a design flaw, but the solution that has been implemented seems to be working well, he told USNI News.

“They put a winch, if you will, at the end of the water twister to rotate the entire assembly so they can wrap the cable around the purchase cable drum. That’s worked fine,” he said.

Most of the arresting system has been installed, and shipbuilders are now adding the final section, the cable shock absorbers – which Moore said are very large and go in a confined space. Newport News Shipbuilding is installing the cable shock absorbers now, at the same time workers put the non-skid coating on the flight deck, which Moore called “a kind of a ballet” to do simultaneously.

Moore said in March that the improved AAG design would have to be tested at Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Lakehurst, but for scheduling reasons he couldn’t postpone installation while awaiting the test results.

“If Lakehurst uncovers something on the system that has to be fixed, the risk I’m taking is I’m installing it and then I have to go back and fix something that’s all ready installed, it’s more challenging. Really at this point, I don’t have a choice,” he said in March...."

Source: http://news.usni.org/2015/05/28/peo-car ... ng-on-time
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Pads Arrestor Gear CVN 131025-N-BX824-057crop.jpg
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Unread post29 May 2015, 02:58

PHOTO: http://cencio4.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/f-18.jpg
"...“Impact pads are made up of several sections of polyurethane pads laid side by side and secured within an outer steel frame. The frame is both welded and bolted to the flight deck inboard of each of the deck sheaves at an approximate 45 degrees forward facing angle. The bolted section of the frame is removable in order to replace worn impact pads as needed. Upon initial arrestment by an aircraft the terminal will impact on the pads instead of the steel deck, minimizing damage to the fittings, purchase cable, and crossdeck pendants.”...

Source: http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... 10_ch3.pdf (2Mb)

& from: http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ ... 10_ch3.pdf (2Mb)
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CVNdeckIMPACTpads.gif
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Unread post29 May 2015, 06:09

Who said the CATbird was a useless piece of waste? Here ya go... & a LONG STORY about EMAL maintainers at this URL:

Sailors ready for launch aboard Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78): http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5938
Collaborative efforts yield essential data, reduce risk during early CATBird JPALS testing
28 May 2015 PEO(T) Public Affairs

"NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – Teamwork between government and industry teams advanced the Navy’s capability to recover aircraft in all weather conditions — a vital solution aimed at protecting people and equipment while enhancing the flexibility, power projection, and strike capabilities of carrier air wings.

The F-35 Cooperative Avionics Test Bed (CATBird), a modified Boeing 737-330, accomplished initial connectivity and datalink testing between the F-35 Lightning II and a Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) test facility at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland in 2014.

Over the past three months, the Landing Systems Test Facility also hosted CATBird to prepare for the second developmental test (DT-II) ship trials of the F-35C Lightning II scheduled for later this year.

“Initial testing with the JPALS ship system was very successful and met F-35 Lightning II primary test objectives,” said Lt. Cmdr. Chris Taylor, co-lead for the JPALS Integrated Product Team at the Naval Air Traffic Management Systems (PMA-213) program office. “Follow-on testing in April and May was also successful in capturing essential data that will deliver F-35 UDB risk reduction to developmental testing with the JPALS ship system.”

A key feature of the former commercial airliner is its ability to transport a team of test engineers in its flying laboratory specially equipped to integrate, test, and validate mission systems avionics for the F-35 Lightning II. The use of CATBird enables the team to test mission systems in a dynamic environment and apply real-time modifications the same day or even hours after a test flight.

At present, CATBird is supporting the development of software scheduled for release this year. The software is part of the Block 3F software build for upcoming F-35B/C developmental and operational tests.

The F-35 is currently integrating the UHF Data Broadcast (UDB) radio with the JPALS ship system as an interim solution during development of an auto-land capability into the JPALS ship system. This capability will allow the Navy to recover aircraft in all-weather conditions by removing human error from the carrier landing process.

To date, UDB tests have been a success due to the collaboration between PMA-213 and industry partners, Taylor noted."

Photo: "The F-35 Cooperative Avionics Test Bed (CATBird) supports software development for upcoming F-35B/C developmental and operational tests, including the elements of the Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS). When fully implemented, JPALS will benefit carrier-based air traffic control by enabling automatic carrier landings (auto-land), enhancing aircraft position reporting, and increasing Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN) functionality. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin)" http://www.navair.navy.mil/img/uploads/ ... 35-web.jpg

Source: http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fu ... ry&id=5937
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Unread post02 Jun 2015, 14:16

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Unread post06 Jun 2015, 18:29

Here go the deadweights via EMALS & FORD - photos by e-mail.
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PCU Gerald R_ Ford stats catapult testting June 5, 2015.jpg
PCU Gerald R_ Ford stats catapult testting June 5, 2015 b.jpg
PCU Gerald R_ Ford stats catapult testting June 5, 2015 a.jpg
PCU Gerald R_ Ford stats catapult testting June 5, 2015 e.jpg
PCU Gerald R_ Ford stats catapult testting June 5, 2015 d.jpg
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Unread post08 Jun 2015, 10:14

EMALS dead load testing begins aboard PCU Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78)
Published on Jun 5, 2015 U.S. Navy

"NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (June 5, 2015) U.S. Navy Sailors, civilian employees and contractors observed a "dead-load" test of the new electromagnetic aircraft launching system (EMALS) aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). The weighted sled was launched into the James River where it was recovered for additional test launches. (U.S. Navy video/Released)"

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Unread post16 Jun 2015, 11:19

Flight Crew: 55 Years of Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment
Published on Jun 15, 2015 NAVAIRSYSCOM

"Naval aviation would not be what it is today without aircraft launch and recovery equipment (ALRE) technology. And ALRE would not be what it is today without Modesto Zacharczenko, a former NAVAIR employee who dedicated more than 50 years of his life to the field. Now serving as deputy director for Aviation and program executive officer for Aircraft Carriers, "Zach" looks back on the successes and challenges behind the ALRE system and how the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System will change our future fleet"

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Unread post16 Jun 2015, 13:01

Navy: EMALS, AAG Will Give Designers More Options for Future Carrier Aircraft [MORE AT THE FLING!}
16 Jun 2015 Megan Eckstein

"...“Typically in our manned aircraft designs, you have to build an airplane that fits within the operating envelopes of the Mk 7 arresting gear and the Mk 13 catapults. So you kind of start with an operating envelope that gets you sort of a design of aircraft like we have now – F-18 Super Hornet, Growler, Joint Strike Fighter,” he said.

“The aircraft are structured that way, they’re strengthened … you build weight and structure into the airplanes to accommodate the violence of the arrested landing. With the Advanced Arresting Gear and the ability to land an airplane – it’s still a controlled crash, but relatively more softly, and to launch it relatively more softly, and so a graduated kind of force as the airplane goes up – you can now start to do things with aircraft design that you couldn’t do before. It might allow us some more margin in weight, in size, and in structure and capability.”

Manazir said industry often wants to marinize existing designs for aircraft, weapons and more so they can operate at sea. But he said adapting aircraft designs for carrier use goes beyond typical marine concerns, and reinforcing the frame to survive catapult launches and trap landings can add so much weight that the payload capacity shrinks, or can rule out design concepts altogether.

“Some of the concepts that are out there with structure and with outer mold line and size, the advanced technology of our AAG and EMALS is going to allow us to kind of open the envelope,” he said.

Ultimately, this new freedom of design may make the most difference with unmanned vehicles that may not take on the same shape and weight as manned aircraft. Manazir said the Navy’s carrier airwing of 2025 will include Super Hornets, Growlers, F-35s and the Unmanned Carrier-Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) aircraft. But in 2040, the flight deck will look drastically different.

“As I look to about 2040, when I think about what we generically call strike fighters – which are the F-18 E and F and the F-35C off the carrier, covered by the EA-18G Growler – when I think about strike fighters operating in a heavy electromagnetic spectrum and I look forward to those airframes, what I see in 2040 is F-35C as the legacy airplane, a UCLASS airframe which is probably up to Increment 2 or 3 by then, and then a FA-XX, which could be manned, unmanned or optionally manned.”

He said the Navy started initial analytical work on FA-XX in conjunction with the Air Force’s early work on their F-X future fighter. But he believes FA-XX will be a family of systems with at least some unmanned capability, and the relative freedom AAG and EMALS bring to engineers may allow for more innovation than would be possible with the legacy launch and recovery systems."

Source: http://news.usni.org/2015/06/16/navy-em ... r-aircraft
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Unread post16 Jun 2015, 22:03

A long screed about the EMALS and issues around testing recently with only a few bits excerpted below so go to URL for more.... AND... :devil: I like the PITCHA becuz it is the only time someone would be pumping the air to see a splash off of de catadepault. :mrgreen:
First Public EMALS Test Delayed Due to ‘Communication-Type Issues’ Among Components
16 Jun 2015 Megan Eckstein

"NEWPORT NEWS, Va. – The Navy’s Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) encountered problems Tuesday morning prior to a round of testing in front of media, but Navy and industry officials say the problem is minor and part of the testing process....

...On Monday, the ship’s crew, along with shipbuilder Newport News Shipbuilding and EMALS manufacturer General Atomics, conducted 10 dead load tests on Catapult 2, with 15 launches in total since June 5. Today was supposed to mark the start of testing on Catapult 1, which experienced the failure.

Newport News Shipbuilding President Matt Mulherin told reporters that EMALS would perform 20 more tests over at least 20 more days, and he said he was confident the system would perform well.

“I think the real key that everybody’s got to understand is, this is why we do this,” he said. “This is new technology, this is why we’re out here doing this testing program is to prove the reliability and to prove that the system works as designed and as required by specs. I have no doubt that we’ll get it there, but today at this time, at 10:00 on Tuesday morning, isn’t going to be the day when this happens.”...

...Scott Forney, president of General Atomics’ Electromagnetic Systems Group, said he was confident the system would be up and running shortly and able to successfully complete the test program this month.

“We’ve already successfully tested 452 airplanes and 3,400 dead loads at the Lakehurst land-based facility, which is the same as this system,” he said. “So it’s unfortunate timing.”

EMALS testing resumed on Ford later Tuesday.

Meier, the ship’s CO, said his crew had already taken operational control of the EMALS system and were writing the schoolhouse curriculum as they learned more about the system. He said installing and learning the EMALS system had been a positive experience for the crew....

...He said the Navy doesn’t have thorough data yet, but the service has a “pretty strong theoretical belief” that the service life of aircraft will be extended by using EMALS instead of the legacy Mk 13 steam catapult. EMALS has a linear acceleration curve – whereas the steam catapult has a front-loaded acceleration that thrusts the aircraft forward under great pressure, the EMALS starts off a bit slower but still reaches the same end speed with less stress on the airframes.

“It can reduce the stress on the aircraft. It can launch aircraft that aren’t even on the drawing books today that are lighter or heavier,” he said, echoing comments from Navy director of air warfare Rear Adm. Michael Manazir on Monday. “And it can also launch them under different or varying wind conditions, so it’s going to give us more operational flexibility than we have today with the current steam catapult system.”

Currently, aircraft carriers have to adjust course to ensure the planes can launch into the right wind conditions, meaning a carrier in a combat area may need to stop or turn around rather than proceeding on course to accommodate the needs of the launch system.

The Navy and industry team will finish the Catapult 1 and 2 dead load testing in the next few weeks. Catapults 3 and 4 are still under construction and will begin testing once complete. Live load testing – launching actual aircraft – will take place next summer."

PHOTO: "Dead load launched from Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) during EMALS testing. HII Photo"
http://i0.wp.com/news.usni.org/wp-conte ... 59-297.jpg


Source: http://news.usni.org/2015/06/16/first-p ... components
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FORDemalsDEADloadSPLASHtest.jpg
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Unread post17 Jun 2015, 20:28

The GOOD video is FIRST - GO DEEPsix with the DEADweight! :mrgreen:
Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) Catapult Demonstration
Published on Jun 16, 2015 The Virginian-Pilot

"Demonstration of the Electromagnetic Launch System (EMALS) on the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). (Courtesy video of HUNTINGTON INGALLS INDUSTRIES)"


USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) tests EMALS
Published on Jun 16, 2015 U.S. Navy

"NEWPORT News, Va. (June 15, 2015) Pre-commissioing Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) conducts dead-load testing of the The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) . (U.S. Navy video/Released)

Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS)

The Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) is a complete carrier-based launch system designed for CVN 78 and all future Gerald R. Ford-class carriers. The launching system is designed to expand the operational capability of the Navy’s future carriers. The mission and function of EMALS remains the same as traditional steam catapult; however, it employs entirely different technologies. EMALS uses stored kinetic energy and solid-state electrical power conversion. This technology permits a high degree of computer control, monitoring and automation. The system will also provide the capability for launching all current and future carrier air wing platforms – lightweight unmanned to heavy strike fighters.

EMALS delivers: • Necessary higher launch energy capacity • Substantial improvements in system weight, volume and maintenance • Increased reliability and efficiency • More accurate end-speed control

EMALS is funded by the CVN 21 program and will be forward fit only for U.S. Ford-class carriers, beginning with Gerald R Ford (CVN 78).

Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment (ALRE) engineers, logisticians and program analysts at NAWCAD Lakehurst have provided integral EMALS support since EMALS’ inception in 1982. The team at Lakehurst provides EMALS life-cycle acquisition management in support of the ALRE Program Office (PMA 251) to include program management, systems engineering, financial analysis, logistics and test and evaluation.

Furthermore, Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst is home to a land-based, ship-representative EMALS, allowing for the testing of hardware and software aspects of the system."

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Unread post18 Jun 2015, 03:20

IF YA GOTTA GO - GoPro - GO NAVAL AIR!
Pres. Ford's Daughter Tests New Carrier Catapult
Published on Jun 17, 2015 Huntington Ingalls Industries

“Ship's sponsor Susan Ford Bales visited Newport News to see progress on the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) and participate in a June 16 demonstration of the new electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS). During the demonstration, she gave the signal to fire the catapult, with two weighted sleds being launched off the carrier around 1:00 p.m.”

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