Possibility small STOVL carrier USN/USMC

Discuss the F-35 Lightning II
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Unread post05 May 2010, 15:27

JSF and STOVL http://www.sae.org/aeromag/techupdate/06-2001/

The VAAC Harrier during the ship-based JSF research program.

The Vectored Thrust Aircraft Advanced Flight Control (VAAC) Harrier operated by Defense Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA) has completed the second phase in the Follow-on Research Program (FRP) sponsored by the U.S./UK Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program. The aircraft has been operating at sea with the Royal Navy carrier HMS Invincible to test aircraft control concepts applicable to the short takeoff vertical landing (STOVL) variant of the JSF. DERA stated that the first, land-based evaluation phase last year built on the results of previous trials, familiarized new pilots with the advanced control concepts of the VAAC Harrier, "and resolved known deficiencies." The major aim of the second phase has been to assess compatibility of advanced recovery modes, including novel techniques such as translational rate command applied to operations from a ship's moving deck. Two main control modes were tested with two variants of the hover positioning sub-mode, reported DERA. It was the first full evaluation of the control laws at sea. It involved UK, U.S., and Italian pilots performing 85 deck landings in various winds and sea states. One of the pilots had no previous experience in a STOVL aircraft or of shipboard operations. The shipboard operations were used to confirm the few concerns with some of the control modes that had already been raised and also allowed comparisons to be made to identify potential preferences, said DERA. VAAC Harrier Test Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Phil Hayde said the work with Invincible had demonstrated the VAAC's capability for a low workload solution that provided carefree handling and a low risk of cognitive failure. This would ease the training burden and cut costs.

The VAAC Harrier is currently at DERA's Boscombe Down site where evaluations are being performed on the STOVL automatic recovery system on the aircraft. A later phase of the FRP will research advanced control for short takeoffs and an enhancement of one of the control concepts that was investigated at sea.

The two-seat VAAC Harrier features a digital flight control system with advanced programmable fly-by-wire capabilities from the rear seat. This gives the backseat pilot full-authority digital control of the aircraft via a computer interface that allows various flying modes to be developed and installed. Also, modifications to the software and the flying experience can be achieved between flights with pilot systems and behavior comparison and feedback. The digital flight control system also offers STOVL capability without the necessity of what DERA terms "the tricky third control lever, thus, significantly reducing pilot workload." The JSF trials build on previous DERA/NASA research into advanced control laws, but the latest work incorporates the first comprehensive shipboard evaluations.

Rolls-Royce, which has more than 40 years of experience with vectored thrust technology, is involved with both airframe contenders (Boeing and Lockheed Martin) in the JSF program. Both of their concept demonstrator aircraft are powered by derivatives of the Pratt and Whitney F119 engine. The STOVL variants' propulsion systems incorporate specialist components including actuators, nozzles, and, in the case of the Lockheed Martin proposal, a remote fan to provide lift augmentation for short takeoff and vertical landing. Rolls-Royce is contracted directly to Lockheed Martin for the shaft-driven lift fan, but provides its lift devices (roll system and vectoring three-bearing swivel module) through a contract with P&W. Rolls-Royce contracts directly to Boeing for specialist equipment for the direct-lift solution favored by Boeing for its X-32B variant. Rolls-Royce is also collaborating with General Electric on an interchangeable main engine designated F120. Funding has been provided to develop the F120 as a main engine option for the JSF program. Rolls-Royce has a 40% share in the program, with responsibility for the low-pressure compressor, low-pressure turbine, combustor, and gearbox. - Stuart Birch"
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post06 May 2010, 05:37

ITN journalist flies QinetiQ’s VAAC Harrier to demonstrate advanced control system 17 July 06

http://www.qinetiq.com/home/newsroom/ne ... rrier.html

"Demonstrating the prowess of the development of ‘Unified Flight Control’, which is a novel control concept developed for the Short Take Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), an ITN journalist with no previous flying experience last week flew and landed QinetiQ’s unique Vectored-thrust Aircraft Advanced flight Control (VAAC) Harrier, which is a research test-bed for the control system.

Prior to flying the aircraft, the journalist, Lawrence McGinty, spent just one day with the company ‘flying’ its VAAC Harrier simulator under the guidance of ATEC test pilot, Lt Chris Götke RN, who flew in the front seat of the VAAC during the flight."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post06 May 2010, 05:47

QinetiQ applies relative GPS solution to achieve world's first automatic landing of a STOVL aircraft onto a ship 13 June 05

http://www.qinetiq.com/home/newsroom/ne ... stovl.html

"QinetiQ has applied its relative GPS technology to achieve the world's first automatic landing of a short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft on a ship, as part of its work for the Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) programme. Funded by the US Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) programme and the UK MOD Joint Combat Aircraft Integrated Project Team (JCA IPT), this is a key milestone in an innovative risk reduction programme for the F-35 STOVL aircraft.

QinetiQ Technical Manager, Jeremy Howitt said: "QinetiQ's system is based on GPS technology but it operates in a relative mode, where both ship and aircraft are moving and their position is calculated relative to each other. Whilst there are radar-based systems that can be used to conduct automatic landings of conventional jets aboard an aircraft carrier, these systems are not accurate enough to bring a STOVL aircraft all the way to touchdown."

The ability to land an aircraft automatically onto a ship will enable pilots of F-35 to conduct missions by day or night and in weather conditions that would previously have not been possible. The 'Autoland' technology developed by QinetiQ for F-35 also significantly reduces the workload of pilots at the end of a mission and at a point when to land the aircraft onto the moving platform of a ship is a difficult and critical procedure. QinetiQ is helping deliver this Autoland capability to the US Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) programme.

QinetiQ's risk reduction programme is also helping the US Department of Defense's F-35 Program Office (JPO) understand more about the challenges associated with automatically landing a STOVL aircraft on a ship.

In QinetiQ's system, the ship position and velocity are transmitted via datalink to the aircraft. The flight management system aboard the aircraft calculates the relative position and velocity between the aircraft and the ship, constructs a trajectory between the two bodies and from this provides steering commands to the autopilot. Standard GPS receivers are situated on the aircraft and the ship, with the ship position corrected to take account of the offset between the GPS antenna location and the desired touchdown point.

Andrew Sleigh, QinetiQ MD Defence said: "The achievement takes automatic landing technology to a new level and is the latest advance of a long line in research by QinetiQ and its British predecessors. Our work in the 1950s led to civil aircraft being able to land in all weathers at airports from the 1960s onwards. Today, QinetiQ has achieved a world first by successfully landing a STOVL aircraft automatically and with no pilot control onto the deck of HMS Invincible."

This new pioneering development comes from the British company, QinetiQ, whose predecessors developed the jet engine, invented carbon fibre and have helped reduce aircraft noise and emissions. QinetiQ and its predecessor organisations have been at the forefront of automatic landing systems technology for the last 50 years and this is the latest in a long line of notable achievements.

In 2002, Lockheed Martin selected a novel control concept, known as 'Unified' for the STOVL F-35 aircraft. This concept was pioneered and matured by QinetiQ in partnership with UK MOD, F-35 Programme Office and Lockheed Martin. This system enables the pilot to simply command the aircraft to go faster or slower and up or down whilst the fly-by-wire control system does all the hard work. QinetiQ's autoland technology takes this capability a step further and the autoland technology also opens up the door for operating Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) from ships."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post26 May 2010, 00:57

Jon Beesley perspective (excerpt - there is much more but not easy to display here) about 'how easy to fly' JSF versions from the 'Commemmorating First Flight PDF' (53Mbs): http://www.zshare.net/download/765117503fa3c3df/
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Unread post27 May 2010, 10:42

Piloting the Joint Strike Fighter Date: 26 May 2010
Testing of the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II (joint strike fighter) is well underway. Ian McInnes catches up with Graham "GT" Tomlinson, BAE Systems' lead test pilot for the STOVL variant, to find out how it flies.

http://www.airforce-technology.com/feat ... ture85998/

"Ian McInnes: Having flown the Harrier, what was your initial reaction to the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) variant of the F-35?

Graham Tomlinson: The Harrier family of aircraft remains a miracle of technology and design which, by the time it retires, will have been hovering for more than half the history of powered flight. It has provided unmatched capabilities and flexibility of basing, with accepted penalties for the pilot in terms of workload and training. But it is also necessary for Harrier pilots to obey some hard-learnt golden rules; break them and it would bite.

The F-35 brings 21st century technology to the table. It retains the flexibility inherent in STOVL aircraft but adds stealth, large increases in performance and capabilities, and – for the first time – offers a STOVL aircraft that looks after the pilot, not the other way round.

Workload is dramatically reduced, training requirements are slashed, and a cocoon of safety protects the pilot from human errors and omissions. The pilot is now able to concentrate fully on the mission tasks in the knowledge that the take-off and landing tasks are trivially easy.

IM: Technical issues aside, did you enjoy flying the aircraft, and what pleased you in particular?

"The F-35 STOVL aircraft looks after the pilot, not the other way round."GT: Early flight tests are all about predicting behaviour. We do that using rigs, simulators, wind tunnels and computer-based analysis, and then confirm that the real behaviour is a close match. We move cautiously in small steps, checking the match through real-time telemetered data to the control team experts. The most pleasing thing from this perspective has been how good our predictions have been.

Purely as a pilot, the most satisfying features have been the rock-solid handling and stability of the aircraft, coupled with brute performance that slightly exceeds our requirements. Pilots always like thrust.

All STOVL aircraft encounter non-linear behaviour close to the ground, caused by hot air bouncing back up and interfering with aerodynamics and propulsion characteristics. I'm greatly encouraged that our experiences of this so far have been as good as we could have hoped; it is far more benign than in the Harrier family. It will undoubtedly remain an area of interest as we expand the wind envelopes for low speed take-offs and landings.

"The most satisfying features have been the rock-solid handling and stability of the aircraft."IM: Did the F-35 training simulation preparation make your flight easier when the real thing came around?

GT: Like many fly-by-wire aircraft, the joint strike fighter uses on-board models of aerodynamic and propulsive effects to decide which flight control surfaces or engine parameters provide the best way to satisfy the pilot's demands. These same models live in our simulators, which provide amazingly accurate representations of the real thing.

In the design years we used the simulators to refine the way the aircraft responds, and this gave us a deep understanding of how the joint strike fighter flies. Now we use the simulators to rehearse missions; it boils down to practice makes perfect. The pilot gets to practice the "monkey skills" he needs to hit test points accurately and consistently, and we hook up the simulator to the control room team so that everyone gets to practice. We emphasise the communications, the rhythm of the mission, the expected areas of interest (the new bits) and we throw in practice failures to create emergency training. It is all very realistic and beneficial.

IM: How much time did you log on F-35 simulation before taking the real aircraft out?

GT: I'd estimate between 1,000 and 2,000 hours; more than enough to feel completely at home in the aircraft before we turned a wheel.

IM: Did any elements of the aircraft's performance surprise you?

GT: I was surprised by how little the aircraft varied from the predictions. Good surprise.

It also surprised me that the aircraft copes so well with the airflow disturbances created by the huge door above the lift fan, which generates destabilising airflow for the rudders and tails.

"The basics of starting up, getting airborne, flying and landing are trivially easy."The upside of the door is that it scoops flow into the lift fan intake and adds significant thrust. The downside is the non-linear flow over the rear of the aircraft at conventional speeds where we convert from a conventional aircraft into a STOVL aircraft. The compromise seems to have been made just about right, as we retain satisfactory control through the conversion process (opening the doors and spinning up the lift fan). This will be another area of interest as we expand the conversion window from our initial heart-of-the-envelope speeds.

IM: Were you happy with the cockpit in this aircraft or will some of it take some getting used too?

GT: All three joint strike fighter variants have identical cockpits. It is a bare cockpit with few switches, focusing on the mission tasks. The basics of starting up, getting airborne, flying and landing the aircraft are trivially easy. The F-35 in STOVL mode flies remarkably like the family of joint strike fighter in conventional mode. A single button commands the conversion, which is then fully automatic.

The mission elements are dominated by a 20x8in touch screen display and by the helmet-mounted display, which replaces the heads-up display of legacy fighters. Voice activation is in the pipeline for some functions, and obviously the legacy Hands On Throttle-And-Stick philosophy has been retained. Getting the best from the mission systems will undoubtedly require a degree of familiarity and practice for the service pilots, but the gut feeling is that the videogame generation will quickly adapt to the full potential of the sophisticated sensor suite.

IM: So what did it feel like to you to fly the F-35 STOVL? Did it seem like just another job or a lot more than that?

GT: You get tied up in the professionalism of the team and don't have much time to think about the job dispassionately. There's a lot to do in flight test because we double and triple check everything, and do everything slowly and steadily with a continuous flow of information between pilot and control room. We also have lots of extra instruments and test kit to shepherd and analyse. So yes, it is just a job when you are actually involved in doing it. It is when you sit back afterwards that you realise what fun it is, how lucky we are as individuals to be involved at this early stage of testing and how the UK's heritage of STOVL aircraft has propelled us to the forefront of testing of this latest incarnation."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post05 Jun 2010, 04:13

Investigation of Non-Traditional Non-Skid Technologies for the U.S. Navy - RNers are helping also:

http://www.corrdefense.org/Technical%20 ... 20Navy.pdf (1Mb)

ABSTRACT
"Current deployment of technologically advanced aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey and the
future deployment of the Joint Strike Fighter F-35B are pushing the envelope of current non-skid
technologies. With these new aircrafts a cast of new performance requirements are emerging, forcing
the U.S. Navy to rethink its position on non-skid technology and how it will be used for flight deck
service. Thermal spray coatings, mechanical surface alterations, alternative coating chemistries,
overlays, and removable or replaceable decking are among some of the technologies being
investigated. Traditional non-skid materials have had a constant struggle to provide sufficient service
life and maintain readiness under current conditions of high traffic, wire wear and impact. However,
future demands for Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) and Vertical Take-off and Landing
(VTOL) aircraft will further complicate the issue adding requirements for high temperature resistance
and extreme durability. This paper will focus on the investigation of alternative materials that will
improve the current performance state of traditional non-skid as well as discuss the status of current
ship board demonstrations of non-traditional non-skid materials."
__________

SUMMARY
This program will develop, evaluate, qualify, and install non-skid coatings, which will have a minimum threshold of 15,000 traps and an objective of 20,000 as compared to the Type I requirement of only 10,000 traps. The proposed coatings will have increased thermal resistance: High Heat variant maximum 400oF [204oC] for 90 minutes, Extreme Heat variant maximum 1700oF [927oC] for 7 to 20 seconds, enhanced overall weatherability and chemical/mechanical resistance as compared to the current “legacy” non-skid systems. For example, increased thermal resistance will reduce foreign object damage (FOD) from overheated and subsequently disbonded non-skid coating during JSF aircraft operations. The proposed system will have twice the service life of the legacy system in relation to mechanical resistance from landing aircraft, and thus reduce the down time required for repair of the present system. Lastly, the system will possess superior color retention which will significantly reduce and/or eliminate the need for surface color topping to maintain proper visual contrast ratios. These new coatings will differ in both their chemical and physical properties from the current MIL-PRF-24667 approved coatings."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post05 Jun 2010, 04:44

Because the Osprey MV-22B or derivative may be used on a 'ski jump' carrier this PDF is significant alone for that (but not for the ski jump part)

MV-22B OSPREY SHORT TAKEOFF AND MINIMUM RUN-ON LANDING TESTS ABOARD LHD CLASS SHIPS

http://www.vtol.org/f65_bestPapers/test ... uation.pdf (1.2Mb)

ABSTRACT
This paper describes recent ship suitability tests conducted by the V-22 Test Team in March 2008 aboard USS IWO JIMA (LHD 7). This testing encompassed expanding the Short Takeoff (STO) envelopes and developing a new landing technique termed Minimum Run-on Landing (MROL) to extend V-22 shipboard capability beyond Vertical Takeoff and Landing (VTOL) gross weights (GW)....
&
CONCLUDING REMARKS
This paper has provided an overview of the test methodology used in order to conduct V-22 sea trials in support of increased shipboard STO capabilities for the fleet [3]. The objectives of this test were partially met. The STO GW envelope was expanded, although not to the fullest extent of the aircraft capability due to insufficient time at-sea. MROL demonstrated to be a revolutionary and safe way to land aboard ship at GWs heavier than VTOL capability and will continue to be developed and tested. An MROL envelope was not recommended due to insufficient test data; however when more can be gathered, the possibility of granting an envelope to the fleet exists...."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post05 Jun 2010, 16:11

This would be very valuable to the Navy should it go ahead with the plans to replace the C-2 with the Osprey.
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Unread post05 Jun 2010, 22:33

For the CVF vaguely I recall an idea to use a V-22 as an AEW aircraft but that idea was shelved, perhaps before the trials (in 2008). Ex-RNers have mentioned this idea; especially when we know an RN pilot is on exchange with an Osprey outfit, can't recall details at moment.
_________________

Ospreys in Flight: A Royal Navy Exchange Officer Perspective Wednesday Jul 08, 2009 Lieutenant Colin Griffiths, Royal Navy, VMM 266 Operations Officer

http://www.navair.navy.mil/v22/index.cf ... ail&id=223

"Having joined the Royal Navy in 1998 and serving with 845 and 846 Naval Air Squadron’s for multiple combat tours as a Commando Helicopter Force [CHF] ‘Junglie’ Sea King Mk 4 helicopter pilot and Helicopter Warfare Instructor, it was in 2007 that I was selected to go on a three year exchange [PEP] tour with the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and would fly the Bell-Boeing V22 tilt-rotor Osprey, with VMM-266 Squadron at MCAS New River, North Carolina. This would be the first UK RN PEP to fly the V22 on the front line, as traditionally the post had always been with the CH46 ‘Frog’ tandem rotor helicopter, being replaced by the V22.

It was in late September 2008 that VMM-266 squadron assumed the mission from VMM-162 for the Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) theatre of operations in Western Iraq (MNF-West), Al Anbar province. From joining the squadron back in October of 2007, through my conversion to all the operational ‘work ups’, we were finally going into an operational combat theater where our skills would be fully tested.

So what is flying the MV-22B Osprey like and especially out on Operations in Iraq?
Most of the landings that are made are to prepared surfaces (either concrete or special matting) which greatly reduces the occurrence of ‘brown out’ reduced visibility landings (RVL). For the occasions where we had to land in RVL conditions, the training we had conducted prior to arrival in Iraq enabled us to complete the landings with confidence in both our and the aircraft’s ability.

Having the significant extra speed, flying at 230kts with 24 fully equipped marines, instead of 90kts in a CH46, that the aircraft brings such benefits; with increased range, like an aircraft, but able to land quickly and almost anywhere like a helicopter. Tactical and strategic advantage for the USMC came into its own. Many of the marine pilots, who have deployed previously to Iraq in legacy platforms, commented on the huge operational benefits of the MV-22B.

The typical tasking that other assault support platforms were conducting, we were able to complete in less than half the time and with half the amount of fuel stops. This greatly increased the efficiency of general support missions in a large area of operations that stretched to around 300 miles in the furthest dimension; the whole Iraq AOA could be covered from our base.

Q: What was a typical day like for a pilot with VMM-266 squadron deployed to OIF?

Depending on which shift you were assigned to (either day or night) then the standard day began with ‘chow’ (USMC term for meal time), then up to the ready room to brief the day’s mission, fly the mission which could be 2 – 6 hours in duration, debrief and then to complete the mission paperwork. It was typically a twelve to fourteen hour workday. Each pilot would not typically fly every day, but sometimes it was as often as 4 to 5 flights a week, which gave plenty of time for carrying out your ground job and for recreation including fitness training. It was a good but often tiring routine and the biggest bonus of being so busy was that the time passed very quickly.

The Squadron conducted a ‘raid’ in January, which was to go into a known insurgent area to capture "individuals of interest" to the Iraqi and US Iraqi governments. The aviation package included a (2) MV-22B assault element, a second MV-22B assault element/Command and Control aircraft, a UH-1N/AH-1W Rotary Wing Escort element, a (2)F/A-18C Fixed Wing Escort/ISR platform, an EA-6B Electronic Warfare element, a (2)RQ-7 Unmanned Aerial System ISR element, and a KC-130J AAR platform. The ground element consisted of around 70 Iraqi Army soldiers and US Marines divided into two 24 man assault teams, and a 20 man QRF "Sparrowhawk."

The command and control MV-22B Osprey also carried the "Sparrowhawk" (Quick Reaction Force) element to prevent "squirters" ie suspects evading the ‘cordoning’ area. In addition to fulfilling the QRF role the Command V22 was also responsible for transporting any detained individuals. The raid force was inserted "on time, on target" and netted a significant weapons cache and one detainee. Both objectives were hit simultaneously and the ‘Sparrow hawk’ was inserted into three different locations to search fleeing vehicles and personnel.

Some personal highlights for me on the deployment included flying the Commandant of the Marine Corps for my Division leader certification flight. This flight leadership designation entrusts a flight leader to lead/control up to four V22 aircraft for assigned missions, day or night. Despite the high priority and status of this tasking it was ‘business as usual for VMM-266 operations department’ in getting maximum value out of all and every opportunity.

I had planned the division movement to include the conduct of two instrument checks and my own division leader assessment flight. This high profile event also required the coordination of press and all supporting details to include a precise arrival and finishing with a ‘Hollywood’ shutdown with all aircraft and with the rotors stopping at the same time before the Commandant departed the aircraft.

The planning and executing the return of the squadron home to MCAS New River, North Carolina, was also my main focus in my role as the future operations officer; in April we put the plan into action. We would fly all 12 planes direct from Iraq to Crete via Turkey some 1100 miles that we would cover in just over 5 hours.
Flying at altitude we were able to take advantage of a higher true airspeed and greatly increased fuel efficiencies and it was great to see the change of scenery from the dusty desert of Iraq for the snow-capped mountains in Turkey. After turkey we ‘went feet wet’ over the Greek Islands and this too was a startling change seeing the ocean for the first time in 7 months. After some well earned rest and relaxation we then flew onto the USS Wasp a USMC LPH and embarked all 12 aircraft and over 100 squadron personnel for the passage through the Mediterranean and across the Atlantic.

Being embarked on a warship was a new experience for quite a few of the squadron personnel, but I had the benefit of being able to compare it to my time on the Royal navy warships including HMS Ocean, HMS Albion and HMS Invincible. The LHD class is a big ship, some 42,000 tons, twice the size of HMS Ocean.
The main difference, I observed, was in the utilization of the flight deck, in that all minor maintenance is carried out on the flight deck on US warships, as opposed to being conducted in the hangar in UK, which is reserved for very specific maintenance requirements. It was a sight to behold all ’12 Ospreys’ folded and ranged/lined up in the starboard ‘bone’. Some things stay the same, such as in the ‘chain gang’, where on Royal Navy LPH the air group accommodation is directly beneath the hanger deck. Here you can often be awoken in the early hours by chains being dragged across the hangar deck. On the USS ship most officer accommodation is directly beneath the flight deck so you get the same kind of noises.
During the embarked time, we conducted training in deck landing practice which is an important skill for a naval aviator and it proved to be a great opportunity to ‘blow the dust off’ in getting the experienced pilots back in the groove of landing on a moving deck and in getting some initial deck landing qualifications for a couple of the pilots and aircrew.

After the crossing the Atlantic it was time for the grand finale; which was the twelve V22 aircraft fly-in to our home base at MCAS New River. This was a great feeling for us and a welcome sight for our families after 7 months deployed and an amazing event to be a part of. We departed the ship some 200 miles off the coast of North Carolina, again highlighting the versatility of this revolutionary aircraft in the case in Ship to Objective Manouevre (STOM) capability; of being truly over the horizon in covering this distance in around 45 minutes. On the way in we flew over an outgoing Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) in a 12 aircraft V formation and used this same formation to overfly the squadron hangar at MCAS New River Air Station before joining for the break in 3 elements of 4 aircraft (a division) where the formation is flown down the runway and max performance turn to bring the aircraft back in for landing in front of the families. Having returned from OIF, the squadron is looking forward with great anticipation to its first afloat Marine Expeditionary Unit deployment and we relish whatever challenges are presented to fulfill our mission wherever we are needed.

It has been an amazing opportunity in being the first non-US tilt rotor pilot to be assigned to a USMC Fleet squadron and to deploy for combat operations in OIF with a frontline Osprey unit. To see this squadron work up from scratch, through training, deploying to Iraq for combat operations and bringing all aircraft and squadron personnel back to the United States has been very fulfilling. This deployment has certainly been interesting, and though not my first rodeo, I have deployed to Iraq three times previously with the RN Commando Helicopter Force, based out of Basra, I have learned a great deal about US combat operations in Iraq and in particular USMC Marine Air Ground Task Force combat operations.

It has been a fine challenge and a great honor to represent the Royal Navy and serve with this ‘band of brothers’ in the ‘Fighting Griffins’ that is VMM 266 out in Al Anbar province, Iraq.
Lieutenant Colin Griffiths Royal Navy"
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post05 Jun 2010, 23:03

Check 'Cygnus' anime avatar: http://www.timawa.net/forum/index.php?topic=23102.0

"Toss
In June 2007 FightGlobal reported that US Navy was seeking to gain support for a demonstration of the Thales Cerberus maritime surveillance radar for the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey, potentially expanding the role of the US Marine Corps and US Air Force tiltrotor programme beyond the transport mission.

The so-called Totally Organic Sensor System (TOSS) would demonstrate that the Westland Sea King ASaC.7's Cerberus airborne surveillance and control sensor could be modularised and installed on a wide range of navy and USMC aircraft, starting with the V-22. The UK Royal Navy would be a joint participant in the TOSS joint concept technology demonstration, if the project is approved.

The US Navy's Naval Sea Systems Command is still searching for a second service to sponsor the project to make the project eligible for a "joint" funding programme, says Ken Moritz, a business development director for Bell Boeing.

The USN is interested in using Cerberus-equipped V-22s for the expeditionary strike group mission. The project is a potential opportunity to drive additional sales of the V-22 for the maritime surveillance role, Moritz says.

The TOSS project also seeks to develop a modular kit for several additional types of US military aircraft.

So far, the Cerberus radar is not a part of the upgrade roadmap for the V-22. The Block B model, which adds a ramp gun, hoist, refuelling probe and reliability improvements, has been finalised. The Block C configuration remains in the definition stage, with proposals to add an internal gun embedded in the fuselage, a new radar and an improved environmental control system. The US Navy also has identified a requirement for a Block D upgrade programme, focusing initially on integrating the assault directed infrared countermeasures suite.

In March 2008 Aviation Week said that Boeing was proposing a three year joint capability technology demonstration (JCTD) with extensive support from the RN. The kit requires very minor modifications to the V-22 - the addition of CV-22-type sponson tanks, power connectors, intercom and a Link 16 antenna - and the radar needs a rigid radome (the Sea King ASaC.7 radome is inflatable.)"
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post05 Jun 2010, 23:58

2008 Osprey News (Bell Boeing): http://www.boeing.com/rotorcraft/milita ... N_2008.pdf (3.7Mb)
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RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post06 Jun 2010, 00:55

A future VLO 'Joint-op', catapult-launch 'Small Carrier' could be a justified ship to begin replacing the 8 ship CVN fleet with a targeted delivery perhaps around 2020. Some combination of nuke powered and conventional/hybrid 'renewable-powered' Small Carrier could be argued.

imho, the objective should be to deploy a total of about 26 combat a/c (comprising two types at most, e.g., F/A-XX (or block V F-35C) and UCAV), plus a complement of rescue/ASW helo/unmanned helo. A full self-defense/self-escort armament capability should be built into the design, or don't do it at all. Perhaps something on a scale of an initial 20 ship doctrine could be studied. God speed.
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Unread post06 Jun 2010, 05:02

geogen, perhaps these new mini USN carriers would have an EMALS catapult going up a ski jump? If EMALS works out OK then this is a possibility whenever... Even have less of an incline (this would be worked out EMALS+RAMP).

Anyway here is a bit of info about JSF STOVL testing: "Flight-testing will be conducted at Fort Worth, Edwards AFB and NAS Patuxent River. Additionally, the STOVL and CV variants will undergo sea trials aboard American, British and Italian aircraft carriers."

http://www.aerotechnews.com/edwardsafb/ ... e-Fighters
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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Unread post06 Jun 2010, 08:10

spazsinbad wrote:For the CVF vaguely I recall an idea to use a V-22 as an AEW aircraft but that idea was shelved, perhaps before the trials (in 2008). Ex-RNers have mentioned this idea; especially when we know an RN pilot is on exchange with an Osprey outfit, can't recall details at moment.


It was shelved for two reasons.
1) Cost. The British government is notoriously cheap and the USN wasn't going to spend billions to convert Naval aviation to inferior performing STOVL aircraft.

2) Simulations showed problems in flight performance with a radar dome. The only options where to come up with something revolutionary or switch to a vastly inferior system like searchwater or HEW-784 with a fraction of the range and target tracking ability the big dish would have.

spazsinbad wrote:Check 'Cygnus' anime avatar: http://www.timawa.net/forum/index.php?topic=23102.0

"Toss
In June 2007 FightGlobal reported that US Navy was seeking to gain support for a demonstration of the Thales Cerberus maritime surveillance radar for the Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey, potentially expanding the role of the US Marine Corps and US Air Force tiltrotor programme beyond the transport mission.

The so-called Totally Organic Sensor System (TOSS) would demonstrate that the Westland Sea King ASaC.7's Cerberus airborne surveillance and control sensor could be modularised and installed on a wide range of navy and USMC aircraft, starting with the V-22. The UK Royal Navy would be a joint participant in the TOSS joint concept technology demonstration, if the project is approved.

The US Navy's Naval Sea Systems Command is still searching for a second service to sponsor the project to make the project eligible for a "joint" funding programme, says Ken Moritz, a business development director for Bell Boeing.

The USN is interested in using Cerberus-equipped V-22s for the expeditionary strike group mission. The project is a potential opportunity to drive additional sales of the V-22 for the maritime surveillance role, Moritz says.

The TOSS project also seeks to develop a modular kit for several additional types of US military aircraft.

So far, the Cerberus radar is not a part of the upgrade roadmap for the V-22. The Block B model, which adds a ramp gun, hoist, refuelling probe and reliability improvements, has been finalised. The Block C configuration remains in the definition stage, with proposals to add an internal gun embedded in the fuselage, a new radar and an improved environmental control system. The US Navy also has identified a requirement for a Block D upgrade programme, focusing initially on integrating the assault directed infrared countermeasures suite.

In March 2008 Aviation Week said that Boeing was proposing a three year joint capability technology demonstration (JCTD) with extensive support from the RN. The kit requires very minor modifications to the V-22 - the addition of CV-22-type sponson tanks, power connectors, intercom and a Link 16 antenna - and the radar needs a rigid radome (the Sea King ASaC.7 radome is inflatable.)"


The Cerberus system on the TOSS is ideal for what the marine corps requirements are.
1) Its a palleted system that does not require a dedicated aircraft. The osprey can get back to ferrying marines and cargo as soon as the pallet is pulled. The Pallet could also be fitted to a H-92 or AW-101

2) While the air to air capability is important to the Marines, lessons learned from the ASAC.7's ground deployments are even more beneficial. Unlike more powerful dedicated air to air radars, searchwater has air to ground tracking modes. In essence, it can act as a mini forward deployed JSTARS giving Marine ground commanders real time tracking of the entire battlefield.
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Unread post10 Jun 2010, 01:53

OLD NEWS for sure however early in the thread there were questions [bjr1028: "The F-35B is not a harrier."] about VACC Harrier simulating the STOVL F-35, so here is some background info: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_forum_viewtopi ... t-270.html

Lockheed Martin JSF Program Conducts Side-Stick Flight Test Aboard UK's Harrier 20 Nov 1998

http://www2.prnewswire.com/cgi-bin/stor ... 228&EDATE=

"FORT WORTH, Texas /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) recently completed 20 hours of flight testing in the United Kingdom to support development of the STOVL (Short Take Off Vertical Landing) variant of the Royal Navy Joint Strike Fighter.

The flights were conducted with Britain's Defence Evaluation Research Agency (DERA) Vectored-thrust Aircraft Advanced Control (VAAC) vehicle, a modified Harrier. The evaluation program tested side-stick control of the aircraft in various STOVL tasks at flight speeds from hover to 200 knots. The testing confirmed that a side stick provides satisfactory control of a STOVL aircraft at the low speeds where the aircraft is airborne.

A total of 36 flights were conducted at the flight test facility at DERA Boscombe Down in the United Kingdom. Test pilots from Lockheed Martin, British Aerospace, the United States Marine Corps and the British Royal Air Force participated in the evaluation.

The test was divided into two phases: a calibration phase where test control laws and stick characteristics were validated followed by an evaluation phase. Evaluation tasks included pattern work, approach and final transition tasks, and precision and aggressive hover tasks.

DERA, a research organization funded by the UK Ministry of Defense, provided the aircraft for the flight test. The VAAC Harrier is a two-seat T-4 trainer fitted out with a fully digital flight control system for advanced STOVL control research. VAAC is equipped with an integrated sensor suite and an advanced flight control computer that can be easily altered to provide varied levels of augmentation for STOVL control law research. Basic flight safety is provided by the VAAC's front seat pilot, who can take control of the aircraft at any point during a test should the need arise.

The VAAC was modified for this test to provide the functionality of Lockheed Martin's JSF STOVL aircraft. Modifications included installation of a side-stick controller in the rear cockpit; alteration of the rear cockpit throttle to provide HOTAS -- Hands On Throttle And Stick -- functionality; and modification to VAAC's fly-by-wire controls to provide JSF STOVL aircraft-type responses.

The side-stick system used in the evaluation was manufactured in Buffalo, New York, by Calspan, an Operation of Veridian. The variable-feel side stick is powered by the aircraft's hydraulic system and controlled by a dedicated Calspan computer located in the cockpit. Characteristics of the stick, such as break-out force, force and deflection gradients, and dynamic attributes, can be varied in real-time, in flight, by the VAAC's flight control computer.

A major portion of the flight test evaluation was dedicated to providing variations in side-stick characteristics to gather an assessment of side-stick control for STOVL flight, and to gather data for the development of the sidestick controller for the JSF Concept Demonstrator Aircraft scheduled to fly in 2000."
RAN FAA A4G Skyhawk 1970s: https://www.faaaa.asn.au/spazsinbad-a4g/ AND https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwqC_s6gcCVvG7NOge3qfAQ/
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