F-16 Block 72 offered to Bulgaria?

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basher54321

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Unread post19 Sep 2018, 19:54

SOFIA, Bulgaria (BulgarianMilitary.com), 19 September 2018,
Author: Boyko Nikolov

The U.S. concern and one of the biggest manufacturers of military equipment in the world – Lockheed Martin made its presentation on 18th September at Arena di Serdica Boutique Hotel in Sofia, and offered to the Bulgarian Government the purchase of the F-16 Block 72 fighter, known as Viper, learned BulgarianMilitary.com

The event was organized by the Atlantic Club of Bulgaria, the chairman of which is Dr. Solomon Passy and with the assistance of Mrs. Kalinka Kovacheva, who is a representative of Lockheed Martin for Bulgaria and Macedonia.

Source: https://bulgarianmilitary.com/f-16-bloc ... -bulgaria/
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piston

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Unread post20 Sep 2018, 21:49

Not very good idea, IMHO
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peacepuma

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Unread post08 Oct 2018, 21:08

mmmm..., lo mejor de la noticia es que el F-16 cada vez mas esta lejos de dejar de producirse, y demuestra que el caza 4 generación esta cada vez mas cerca de sus rivales de 5ta generación, el block 70/72 es un 4++ neto.

mmmm.....the best news is that the F-16 is increasingly far from stop producing, and shows that the fighter 4 generations this time closer to their rivals of 5th generation, the block 70/72 is a net 4+ + .
Last edited by peacepuma on 08 Oct 2018, 22:33, edited 1 time in total.
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viper12

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Unread post08 Oct 2018, 22:14

¿habla inglés?
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ricnunes

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Unread post08 Oct 2018, 23:20

peacepuma wrote:mmmm..., lo mejor de la noticia es que el F-16 cada vez mas esta lejos de dejar de producirse, y demuestra que el caza 4 generación esta cada vez mas cerca de sus rivales de 5ta generación, el block 70/72 es un 4++ neto.

mmmm.....the best news is that the F-16 is increasingly far from stop producing, and shows that the fighter 4 generations this time closer to their rivals of 5th generation, the block 70/72 is a net 4+ + .


Perhaps instead of simply using Google translator to translate your original post in Castilian/Spanish you should actually try to make posts in English. A Translation from a Latin language to English usually has a "goofy" result.
Anyway, imagine if I posted in Portuguese (which is currently my first language) or a Chinese came here posting in Mandarin or people from Russia posting in Russian than imagine the mess that all these forums would become, eh?

Regarding from your post proper, NO the 4th generation fighter aircraft are not getting anywhere closer to 5th gen fighter aircraft in order to rival with them. For example a F-16 Block 70 (or a Super Hornet, or a Typhoon, or a Rafale, etc...) would be a rival of a F-35 the same way a P-51 would rival with a F-86 or a F-86 would rival with a F-104 Starfighter, or resuming they don't rival since there aren't a match in terms of overall capabilities since again, they are generations apart.
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peacepuma

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Unread post09 Oct 2018, 22:38

I understand, but your claim is very hysterical..., and You're wrong, a fighter 4++ , can rival a fighter 5 Generation.
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popcorn

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Unread post09 Oct 2018, 23:20

You can try and pretty up a 4gen as much as you want but at the end of the day it's still a pig.
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"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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ricnunes

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Unread post10 Oct 2018, 00:25

LOL popcorn :mrgreen:

peacepuma wrote:I understand, but your claim is very hysterical..., and You're wrong, a fighter 4++ , can rival a fighter 5 Generation.


You can for sure feel free to believe in whatever you want. For all I care you can also believe in Santa Claus and his Leprechauns but this doesn't make such believes or claims as being facts/truth.

A gen 4+++++++++++ fighter (it doesn't matter how many pluses you put in front of the 4) has probably less chances in wining against a 5th gen fighter aircraft than a P-51 Mustang had in winning against a F-86 Sabre or a F-104 Starfighter had in winning against a F-4 Phantom (you see, different generations with always the newer one having the overwhelming advantage).
Everyone has their own (wet) dreams. Mine is winning the lottery, yours seems to be having a 4th gen fighter aircraft that has a similar/equal chance against a 5th gen fighter aircraft. Well at least my dream has the possibility of becoming real... :roll:
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Unread post10 Oct 2018, 21:48

teh viper 4 +/++, generation armed with JHMS AAM Python IV AND V can defeat a hunting F-35
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Unread post10 Oct 2018, 23:08

peacepuma wrote:teh viper 4 +/++, generation armed with JHMS AAM Python IV AND V can defeat a hunting F-35

:lmao:
It doesn't matter if you keep adding pluses to F-16 or Su-27 or Rafale or Gripen or... it's still not fifth gen. (see popcorn's post above)
Even excluding signature reductions, there is no F-16 variant with comparable radar, IRST, ESM, comms and engines to the F-35. Good luck.
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popcorn

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Unread post10 Oct 2018, 23:15

Still gonna be a pig...and a rather tasty one..
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"When a fifth-generation fighter meets a fourth-generation fighter—the [latter] dies,”
CSAF Gen. Mark Welsh
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ricnunes

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Unread post11 Oct 2018, 12:11

peacepuma wrote:teh viper 4 +/++, generation armed with JHMS AAM Python IV AND V can defeat a hunting F-35


AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Sorry I couldn't resist.

And of course santa's sleigh can defeat both the 4++++++++++++++++++++ fighter aircraft and a F-35 at the same time in a blink of an eye, LOL :doh:
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Unread post11 Oct 2018, 12:12

popcorn wrote:Still gonna be a pig...and a rather tasty one..


LOL :mrgreen:
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Unread post11 Oct 2018, 23:19

Silly buralas, little I argue .., we all know that a F-16 ++ with elctronica similar to the F-35 and Python IV-V, it manages to defeat even F-35, both can give maneuvers 9G and -3G, f-35 is top, not invensible to the F-35
Last edited by peacepuma on 12 Oct 2018, 13:33, edited 1 time in total.
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Unread post11 Oct 2018, 23:30

F-35 Joint Strike Fighter vs. F-16; The F-16 Wins in a Dogfight, But Does It Matter?
April 1, 2017 Comments Off on F-35 Joint Strike Fighter vs. F-16; The F-16 Wins in a Dogfight, But Does It Matter? 54,782 Views


To Replace Or Not To Replace, That Is the Question

The F-16 has been tried and true for years, but it is to be replaced by the most expensive conventional weapons project for the DOD F-35 project from hell that has cost the United States over $350 Billion. The recent buzz is all about the maneuverable, external weapons loaded F-16 winning over the stealth loaded F-35 in a dog fight, but does that mean the Air Force will put a kibosh on the F-35? Of course not if the opinions of the USAF pilots of the F-35 count. Breaking Defense has a current comparison and arguments for the use of both.

The F-35 is touted to be able to spot and neutralize the enemy before the enemy can spot it. Breaking Defense had a rare interview with the Air Force in 2014 with one discussion leading to what the F-35 can do in the first 10 days of war,

“Gen. Hostage noted during our interview that the F-35 pilot who engages in a dogfight has either made a mistake or been very unlucky. Shooting down other planes using kinetics is only one role of the F-35. Perhaps air forces around the world are going to have to come up with a new honor other than ace to define those who fly the F-35. What should a pilot be awarded for outsmarting the best air defense systems in the world (like the Russian S-300 and S-400) or injecting something like Stuxnet into the enemy’s command and control system? So much of what this aircraft will do has nothing to do with shooting down another pilot that we may need a new term.”

But for hot dog fights, it is the F-16, not the F-35 that is the aircraft of choice.

“The F-35 doesn’t have the altitude, doesn’t have the speed [of the F-22], but it can beat the F-22 in stealth,” Hostage told Breaking Defense, “The F-35 is geared to go out and take down the surface targets.” In fact, it takes eight F-35s to do what two F-22s can accomplish in the early stages of a war.F-16

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. — Lt. Col. Mike Cosby, 177th Fighter Wing commander, flies an F-16C block 25 aircraft from here to Atlantic City International Airport, N.J. The wing participated in Combat Archer training at Tyndall. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Don Taggart)

Take a look at what the Air Force official information the USAF wants public on both aircraft is below and more from Breaking defense below:

F-16

Mission
The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a compact, multi-role fighter aircraft. It is highly maneuverable and has proven itself in air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack. It provides a relatively low-cost, high-performance weapon system for the United States and allied nations.

Features
In an air combat role, the F-16’s maneuverability and combat radius (distance it can fly to enter air combat, stay, fight and return) exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles (860 kilometers), deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft, and return to its starting point. An all-weather capability allows it to accurately deliver ordnance during non-visual bombing conditions.

In designing the F-16, advanced aerospace science and proven reliable systems from other aircraft such as the F-15 and F-111 were selected. These were combined to simplify the airplane and reduce its size, purchase price, maintenance costs and weight. The light weight of the fuselage is achieved without reducing its strength. With a full load of internal fuel, the F-16 can withstand up to nine G’s — nine times the force of gravity — which exceeds the capability of other current fighter aircraft.

The cockpit and its bubble canopy give the pilot unobstructed forward and upward vision, and greatly improved vision over the side and to the rear. The seat-back angle was expanded from the usual 13 degrees to 30 degrees, increasing pilot comfort and gravity force tolerance. The pilot has excellent flight control of the F-16 through its “fly-by-wire” system. Electrical wires relay commands, replacing the usual cables and linkage controls. For easy and accurate control of the aircraft during high G-force combat maneuvers, a side stick controller is used instead of the conventional center-mounted stick. Hand pressure on the side stick controller sends electrical signals to actuators of flight control surfaces such as ailerons and rudder.

Avionics systems include a highly accurate enhanced global positioning and inertial navigation systems, or EGI, in which computers provide steering information to the pilot. The plane has UHF and VHF radios plus an instrument landing system. It also has a warning system and modular countermeasure pods to be used against airborne or surface electronic threats. The fuselage has space for additional avionics systems.

Background
The F-16A, a single-seat model, first flew in December 1976. The first operational F-16A was delivered in January 1979 to the 388th Tactical Fighter Wing at Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

The F-16B, a two-seat model, has tandem cockpits that are about the same size as the one in the A model. Its bubble canopy extends to cover the second cockpit. To make room for the second cockpit, the forward fuselage fuel tank and avionics growth space were reduced. During training, the forward cockpit is used by a student pilot with an instructor pilot in the rear cockpit.

All F-16s delivered since November 1981 have built-in structural and wiring provisions and systems architecture that permit expansion of the multirole flexibility to perform precision strike, night attack and beyond-visual-range interception missions. This improvement program led to the F-16C and F-16D aircraft, which are the single- and two-place counterparts to the F-16A/B, and incorporate the latest cockpit control and display technology. All active units and many Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units have converted to the F-16C/D.



The F-16 was built under an unusual agreement creating a consortium between the United States and four NATO countries: Belgium, Denmark, the Netherlands and Norway. These countries jointly produced with the United States an initial 348 F-16s for their air forces. Final airframe assembly lines were located in Belgium and the Netherlands. The consortium’s F-16s are assembled from components manufactured in all five countries. Belgium also provides final assembly of the F100 engine used in the European F-16s. Recently, Portugal joined the consortium. The long-term benefits of this program will be technology transfer among the nations producing the F-16, and a common-use aircraft for NATO nations. This program increases the supply and availability of repair parts in Europe and improves the F-16’s combat readiness.

USAF F-16 multirole fighters were deployed to the Persian Gulf in 1991 in support of Operation Desert Storm, where more sorties were flown than with any other aircraft. These fighters were used to attack airfields, military production facilities, Scud missiles sites and a variety of other targets.

During Operation Allied Force, USAF F-16 multirole fighters flew a variety of missions to include suppression of enemy air defense, offensive counter air, defensive counter air, close air support and forward air controller missions. Mission results were outstanding as these fighters destroyed radar sites, vehicles, tanks, MiGs and buildings.

Since Sept. 11, 2001, the F-16 has been a major component of the combat forces committed to the Global War on Terrorism flying thousands of sorties in support of operations Noble Eagle (Homeland Defense), Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Iraqi Freedom

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Multirole fighter
Contractor: Lockheed Martin Corp.
Power Plant: F-16C/D: one Pratt and Whitney F100-PW-200/220/229 or General Electric F110-GE-100/129
Thrust: F-16C/D, 27,000 pounds
Wingspan: 32 feet, 8 inches (9.8 meters)
Length: 49 feet, 5 inches (14.8 meters)
Height: 16 feet (4.8 meters)
Weight: 19,700 pounds without fuel (8,936 kilograms)
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 37,500 pounds (16,875 kilograms)
Fuel Capacity: 7,000 pounds internal (3,175 kilograms); typical capacity, 12,000 pounds with two external tanks (5443 kilograms)
Payload: Two 2,000-pound bombs, two AIM-9, two AIM-120 and two 2400-pound external fuel tanks
Speed: 1,500 mph (Mach 2 at altitude)
Range: More than 2,002 miles ferry range (1,740 nautical miles)
Ceiling: Above 50,000 feet (15 kilometers)
Armament: One M-61A1 20mm multibarrel cannon with 500 rounds; external stations can carry up to six air-to-air missiles, conventional air-to-air and air-to-surface munitions and electronic countermeasure pods
Crew: F-16C, one; F-16D, one or two
Unit cost: F-16A/B , $14.6 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars); F-16C/D,$18.8 million (fiscal 98 constant dollars)
Initial operating capability: F-16A, January 1979; F-16C/D Block 25-32, 1981;
F-16C/D Block 40-42, 1989; and F-16C/D Block 50-52, 1994
Inventory: Total force, F-16C/D, 1018



F-35

F-35 A
Luke Air Force Base’s first F-35 Lightning II flies overhead March 10, 2014, before it lands on base for the first time. The aircraft is the first of 144 F-35s that will eventually be assigned to the base. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Darlene Seltmann)
The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II is a family of single-seat, single-engine, all-weather stealth multirole fighters undergoing testing and final development by the United States. The fifth generation combat aircraft is designed to perform ground attack, aerial reconnaissance, and air defense missions. The F-35 has three main models: the F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant, the F-35B short take-off and vertical-landing (STOVL) variant, and the F-35C carrier-based Catapult Assisted Take-Off Barrier Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) variant.
Mission
The F-35A is the U.S. Air Force’s latest fifth-generation fighter. It will replace the U.S. Air Force’s aging fleet of F-16 Fighting Falcons and A-10 Thunderbolt II’s, which have been the primary fighter aircraft for more than 20 years, and bring with it an enhanced capability to survive in the advanced threat environment in which it was designed to operate. With its aerodynamic performance and advanced integrated avionics, the F-35A will provide next-generation stealth, enhanced situational awareness, and reduced vulnerability for the United States and allied nations.

Features
The conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) F-35A gives the U.S. Air Force and allies the power to dominate the skies – anytime, anywhere. The F-35A is an agile, versatile, high-performance, 9g capable multirole fighter that combines stealth, sensor fusion, and unprecedented situational awareness.

The F-35A’s advanced sensor package is designed to gather, fuse and distribute more information than any fighter in history, giving operators a decisive advantage over all adversaries. Its processing power, open architecture, sophisticated sensors, information fusion and flexible communication links make the F-35 an indispensable tool in future homeland defense, Joint and Coalition irregular warfare and major combat operations.

Maj. Justin Robinson flies the 56th Operations Group flagship F-16 Fighting Falcon as he escorts Luke Air Force Base's first F-35 Lightning II to the base March 10, 2014. The F-35 was flown by Col. Roderick Cregier, an F-35 test pilot stationed at Edwards AFB, Calif. Robin
Maj. Justin Robinson flies the 56th Operations Group flagship F-16 Fighting Falcon as he escorts Luke Air Force Base’s first F-35 Lightning II to the base March 10, 2014. The F-35 was flown by Col. Roderick Cregier, an F-35 test pilot stationed at Edwards AFB, Calif. Robin
Because logistics support accounts for two-thirds of an aircraft’s life cycle cost, the F-35 is designed to achieve unprecedented levels of reliability and maintainability, combined with a highly responsive support and training system linked with the latest in information technology. The Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS) integrates current performance, operational parameters, current configuration, scheduled upgrades and maintenance, component history, predictive diagnostics (prognostics) and health management, operations scheduling, training, mission planning and service support for the F-35. Essentially, ALIS performs behind-the-scenes monitoring, maintenance and prognostics to support the aircraft and ensure continued health and enhance operational planning and execution.

The F-35’s electronic sensors include the Electro-Optical Distributed Aperture System (DAS). This system provides pilots with situational awareness in a sphere around the aircraft for enhanced missile warning, aircraft warning, and day/night pilot vision.. Additionally, the aircraft is equipped with the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS). The internally mounted EOTS provides extended range detection and precision targeting against ground targets, plus long range detection of air-to-air threats.

The F-35’s helmet mounted display system is the most advanced system of its kind. All the intelligence and targeting information an F-35 pilot needs to complete the mission is displayed on the helmet’s visor.

The F-35 contains state-of-the-art tactical data links that provide the secure sharing of data among its flight members as well as other airborne, surface and ground-based platforms required to perform assigned missions. The commitment of JSF partner nations to common communications capabilities and web-enabled logistics support will enable a new level of Coalition interoperability. These capabilities allow the F-35 to lead the defense community in the migration to the net-centric war fighting force of the future.



The F-35’s engine produces 43,000 lbs of thrust and consists of a 3-stage fan, a 6-stage compressor, an annular combustor, a single stage high-pressure turbine, and a 2 stage low-pressure turbine.

The F-35 is designed to provide the pilot with unsurpassed situational awareness, positive target identification and precision strike in all weather conditions. Mission systems integration and outstanding over-the-nose visibility features are designed to dramatically enhance pilot performance.

With nine countries involved in its development (United States, United Kingdom, Italy, Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Australia), the F-35 represents a new model of international cooperation, ensuring U.S. and Coalition partner security well into the 21st Century. The F-35 also brings together strategic international partnerships, providing affordability by reducing redundant research and development and providing access to technology around the world. Along these lines, the F-35 will employ a variety of US and allied weapons.
Background

The F-35 is designed to replace aging fighter inventories including U.S. Air Force F-16s and A-10s, U.S. Navy F/A-18s, U.S. Marine Corps AV-8B Harriers and F/A-18s, and U.K. Harrier GR.7s and Sea Harriers. With stealth and a host of next-generation technologies, the F-35 will be far and away the world’s most advanced multi-role fighter. There exists an aging fleet of tactical aircraft worldwide. The F-35 is intended to solve that problem.

On October 26, 2001, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Edward C. “Pete” Aldridge Jr. announced the decision to proceed with the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) program. This approval advanced the program to the System Development and Demonstration (SDD) phase. The Secretary of the Air Force James G. Roche announced the selection of Lockheed Martin teamed with Northrop Grumman and BAE to develop and then produce the JSF aircraft.

During this SDD phase, the program will focus on developing a family of strike aircraft that significantly reduces life-cycle cost while meeting operational requirements. The requirements represent a balanced approach to affordability, lethality, survivability and supportability. The program will use a phased block approach that addresses aircraft and weapons integration and provides a validated and verified air system for Initial Operational Capability requirements.

General Characteristics
Primary Function: Multirole fighter
Prime Contractor: Lockheed Martin
Power Plant: One Pratt & Whitney F135-PW-100 turbofan engine
Thrust: 43,000 pounds
Wingspan: 35 feet (10.7 meters)
Length: 51 feet (15.7 meters)
Height: 14 feet (4.38 meters)
Maximum Takeoff Weight: 70,000 pound class
Fuel Capacity: Internal: 18,498 pounds
Payload: 18,000 pounds (8,160 kilograms)
Speed: Mach 1.6 (~1,200 mph)
Range: More than 1,350 miles with internal fuel (1,200+ nautical miles), unlimited with aerial refueling
Ceiling: Above 50,000 feet (15 kilometers)
Armament: Internal and external capability. Munitions carried vary based on mission requirements.
Crew: One

More from Breaking Defense

http://breakingdefense.com/2015/07/f-16 ... whos-best/

VIDEO DISCOVERY

The Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II (also known as the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter) is a family of single-seat, single-engine, fifth-generation multirole fighters under development to perform ground attack, reconnaissance, and air defense missions with stealth capability. The F-35 has three main models; the F-35A is a conventional takeoff and landing variant, the F-35B is a short take-off and vertical-landing variant, and the F-35C is a carrier-based variant.

AF F-35 Lightening Video Published on Apr 17, 2013
Multimedia package showcasing the F-35A Lighting II capabilities integrated with the US Air Force Warfare Center mission. The F-35A is a multirole fighter aircraft designed to supplement and eventually replace the F-16 and A-10 and complement the F-22.

https://www.sofmag.com/f-35-vs-f-16/
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