Do F-16 pilots do foreign exchange tours?

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neurotech

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Unread post22 Jul 2013, 19:19

huggy wrote:
neurotech wrote: Also, Stall training in big jets traditionally focuses on powering out of a stall,...

What do you mean?

This was talked about widely in the media after the AF447 FDR/CVR was recovered, and the accident sequence identified. http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.asp ... 501050.xml
http://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/medi ... 20-109.pdf

fulcrumflyer wrote:To get back to the original question, I flew MiG-29s as a USAF exchange pilot for nearly 3 years. So yeah, US Viper pilots do get sent to other countries to fly something other than F-16s.
I read some of your posts in awe. The MiG-29 should never be underestimated as a BVR fighter in close. Did you get sent to Nellis AFB after your exchange tour?
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fulcrumflyer

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Unread post22 Jul 2013, 20:14

I read some of your posts in awe. The MiG-29 should never be underestimated as a BVR fighter in close. Did you get sent to Nellis AFB after your exchange tour?

I thought having been an F-5 Aggressor pilot (albeit for less than 18 month before the squadron was closed) and flying the MiG-29 that I'd go INS-direct to the the Red Flag Aggressors. Not so fast. In the USAF's standard of good deal / bad deal, I went from flying the MiG-29 (good deal) to Cannon AFB as the wing weapons officer (bad deal). I did make it back to Nellis on the next assignment though. Retired in Dec 04. Still flying a privately-owned MiG-29, so I've got that going for me - which is nice. The MiG-29 is a great dogfighter regardless of its poor handling qualities. Unfortunately, as we've seen in conflicts starting with Desert Storm, it most likely won't make it to the merge. Now I'm diverging from the original subject so I'll just shut up. Cheers.
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Siesta

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Unread post23 Jul 2013, 00:37

Jumpers F-22 article...

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123009594

From the sounds of it - Senior Officer Course.
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icemaverick

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Unread post23 Jul 2013, 01:09

fulcrumflyer wrote:To get back to the original question, I flew MiG-29s as a USAF exchange pilot for nearly 3 years. So yeah, US Viper pilots do get sent to other countries to fly something other than F-16s.


That's pretty fascinating. I'd love to read about some of your experiences. Most importantly, I'd love to hear your perspective on the age old "F-16 vs MiG-29" debate.
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neurotech

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Unread post23 Jul 2013, 01:44

Siesta wrote:Jumpers F-22 article...

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123009594

From the sounds of it - Senior Officer Course.

While I can imagine the standard course is considerably longer, 50 hours academics, 5-sims, 3-flights to qualify isn't exactly "kick the tires and light the fires" before hoping in the front seat of the jet. I remember asking another senior pilot (O-7 at the time) about what is was like to fly with Gen. Jumper, and he said that he wasn't uncomfortable about having a 4-star fly with him, and the General had some recent experience in other jets(F-16 most likely) and competently trained to fly the F-22. Both Generals knew each other quite well, and worked together at various assignments.

My concern is more with the impression that an experienced pilot, even a test pilot, can fly front-seat any unfamiliar aircraft, without prior simulator training, or back-seat orientation, without serious safety concerns.
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LinkF16SimDude

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Unread post23 Jul 2013, 22:20

The Exchange goes both ways. We've had allied drivers do stints with our flying branches over the years. And they've flown some of our higher end stuff, too. To wit:

"RAF Pilots Live The American Dream"
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cutlassracer

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Unread post24 Jul 2013, 05:27

At Holloman we had the RAF pilots in the 9th and the 8th seemed to get the USN pilots. I launched the RAF guys quite often. Launched a Tomcat driver during an excercise. All great folks. Sqdn Ldr Sutton is the only one I can remember.
Torrejon, Homestead, Moody, Osan, Holloman
USAF Crew Chief 89-99
F-16D 90-0794/90-0779
F-117A 83-0807
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huggy

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Unread post24 Jul 2013, 06:33

LinkF16SimDude wrote:The Exchange goes both ways.

Hence, why it is called "an exchange".

Many years ago, the Marine Corps was interested in doing a Hornet / U-2 exchange. It got some traction, until the ACC/DO (now called the ACC/A3) decided he wanted an F-16 or RF-4 guy to go. That's not what the USMC wanted, and the program died right then.
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knuckles

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Unread post15 Feb 2017, 19:46

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sy-NS1zX7x4

This is a case of the other way around...German flying the Viper
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35_aoa

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Unread post16 Feb 2017, 03:58

Interesting about the runway PIO conversation. I had the exact opposite occur coming from an F/A-18 background to my first crosswind landing in an F-16 (which was in an -A so it was mine to F away). Like you mentioned, you need to be real ginger with NWS/rudder inputs in the Hornet in a crosswind, particularly with any sort of wet runway condition. I translated this to the F-16, and it didn't work out so well without NWS in the aerobrake. Long story short, I wasn't nearly aggressive enough, allowed a significant drift to occur, and got extremely close to going off the runway before I just said to hell with it, dropped the nose, and differential braked myself out of it. Probably the closest I have come to pulling the handle. Didn't break anything, but scared the crap out of myself.

As for planing link failures, I haven't really heard of on deck rudder kicks causing it, but that isn't to say it hasn't ever happened. I could see that if damage had already occurred. The big one is landing hard with a side load. Friend of mine completely bent the connecting link (the other bar) at the boat landing off centerline, and making a big play at the last second back to the left. Left main touched down right on "fast eddy" (the cover for the catapult shuttle in the landing area), boltered, and immediately got planing link failure indications. Also was immediately below his bingo to the beach due to being unable to raise the gear anymore…….he was just about bingo on the ball on that pass, so now was basically one remaining pass from running out of gas. The plan was to have him eject alongside if he boltered again. Luckily he flew a full low ball all the way into a taxi-one wire and they craned him out of the LA. His landing technique improved a lot after that, with a little paddles attention, and he now flies F-35's so again, a scare that doesn't hurt you can sometimes be a good thing :)
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